The Edinburgh Review, Volume 83

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A. and C. Black, 1846

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Página 385 - Where the lamps quiver So far in the river, With many a light From window and casement, From garret to basement, She stood, with amazement, Houseless by night. The bleak wind of March Made her tremble and shiver; But not the dark arch, Or the black flowing river: Mad from life's history, Glad to death's mystery, Swift to be hurled — Anywhere, anywhere Out of the world!
Página 320 - My conceit of his person was never increased toward him by his place, or honours: but I have and do reverence him, for the greatness that was only proper to himself, in that he seemed to me ever, by his work, one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration, that had been in many ages. In his adversity I ever prayed, that God would give him strength; for greatness he could not want.
Página 75 - To abolish a status, which in all ages GOD has sanctioned, and man has continued, would not only be robbery to an innumerable class of our fellow-subjects; but it would be extreme cruelty to the African Savages, a portion of whom it saves from massacre, or intolerable bondage in their own country, and introduces into a much happier state of life; especially now when their passage to the West-Indies and their treatment there is humanely regulated. To abolish that trade would be to — shut the gates...
Página 388 - Oh, clasp me, sweet, whilst thou art mine, And do not take my tears amiss ; For tears must flow to wash away A thought that shows so stern as this ; Forgive, if somewhile I forget, In woe to come, the present bliss. As frighted Proserpine let fall Her flowers at the sight of Dis, Even so the dark and bright will kiss.
Página 186 - ... houses on the same account), we have, by a field return this day made, no less than two thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight men now in camp unfit for duty because they are barefoot and otherwise naked.
Página 340 - Decked with jewels she had on, Of a comely countenance and grace was she, And by birth and parentage of high degree. As his prisoner there he kept her, In his hands her life did...
Página 378 - The coot was swimming in the reedy pond, Beside the water-hen, so soon affrighted ; And in the weedy moat the heron, fond Of solitude, alighted. The moping heron, motionless and stiff, That on a stone, as silently and stilly, Stood, an apparent sentinel, as if To guard the water-lily.
Página 382 - A quibble is to Shakespeare what luminous vapours are to the traveller : he follows it at all adventures ; it is sure to lead him out of his way, and sure to engulf him in the mire.
Página 497 - Keep always to the point, or with an eye upon it, and instead of saying things to make people stare and wonder, say what will withhold them hereafter from wondering and staring. This is philosophy; to make remote things tangible, common things extensively useful, useful things extensively common, and to leave the least necessary for the last.
Página 187 - All our departments, all our operations, are at a stand ; and unless a system, very different from that which has for a long time prevailed, be immediately adopted throughout the States, our affairs must soon become desperate beyond the possibility of recovery.

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