Sunny Memories of Foreign Lands, Volume 2

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Phillips, Sampson, 1854 - 437 páginas
Not long after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe traveled to Europe. On her return, she produced this book, in two volumes, €of her letters and journals during the trip. It was used widely as a guidebook by Americans traveling overseas.€This is volume two.

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Página 28 - Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man. What passion cannot Music raise and quell? When Jubal struck the chorded shell, His listening brethren stood around, And, wondering, on their faces fell To worship that celestial sound. Less than a god they thought there could not dwell Within the hollow of that shell, That spoke so sweetly, and so well.
Página 240 - Have the gates of death been opened unto thee? Or hast thou seen the doors of the shadow of death?
Página 70 - To abolish a status, which in all ages GOD has sanctioned, and man has continued, would not only be robbery to an innumerable class of our fellow-subjects; but it would be extreme cruelty to the African Savages, a portion of whom it saves from massacre, or intolerable bondage in their own country, and introduces into a much happier state of life; especially now when their passage to the West-Indies and their treatment there is humanely regulated. To abolish that trade would be to — shut the gates...
Página 308 - Lord, thou hast been our dwelling-place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God. Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men. For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.
Página 70 - The wild and dangerous attempt which has for some time been persisted in to obtain an act of our Legislature, to abolish so very important and necessary a branch of commercial interest...
Página 304 - For, behold, darkness shall cover the earth, and gross darkness the people; but the Lord shall arise upon thee, and His glory shall be seen upon thee, and the Gentiles shall come to thy light, and kings to the brightness of thy rising.
Página 170 - O'er other creatures ; yet when I approach Her loveliness, so absolute* she seems And in herself complete, so well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say, Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best . All higher knowledge in her presence falls Degraded, wisdom in discourse with her Loses discount'nanc'd, and like folly shows...
Página 73 - But the severest stroke was that inflicted by the persecution, begun and pursued by persons interested in the continuance of the trade, of such witnesses as had been examined against them, and whom, on account of their dependent situation in life, it was most easy to oppress. As I had been the means of bringing these forward on these occasions, they naturally came to me, when thus persecuted, as the author of their miseries and their ruin. From their supplications and wants it would have been ungenerous...
Página 217 - He stood and measured the earth ; he beheld and drove asunder the nations ; and the everlasting mountains were scattered, the perpetual hills did bow : his ways are everlasting.
Página 66 - It was but one gloomy subject from morning to night. In the daytime I was uneasy. In the night I had little rest. I sometimes never closed my eyelids for grief.

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