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gaged in the military or naval service of the United States.

of the press, and suspension of the privilege of habeas corpus, and the right of trial by jury— Third. All persons who, at the time they may such encroachments upou our free institutions seek to obtain the benefits of this proclamation, in times of peace being dangerous to public are actually in civil, military, or naval confine-liberty, incompatible with the individual rights ment or custody, or legally held to bail, either of the citizen, contrary to the genius and spirit before or after conviction, and all persons who of our republican form of government, and exwere engaged directly or indirectly in the assas-haustive of the national resources; sination of the late President of the United And whereas it is believed that amnesty and States, or in any plot or conspiracy in any manner therewith connected.

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Of General Amnesty, July 4. 1868. Whereas in the mouth of July, A. D. 1861, in accepting the condition of civil war, which was brought about by insurrection and rebellion in several of the States which constitute the United States, the two houses of Congress did solemnly declare that the war was not waged on the part of the Government in any spirit of oppression,nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor for any purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of the States, but only to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution of the United States, and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; and that so soon as these objects should be acaccomplished, the war on the part of the Government should cease;

And whereas the President of the United States has heretofore, in the spirit of that declaration, and with the view of securing for it ultimate and complete effect, set forth several proclamations, offering amnesty and pardon to persons who had been or were concerned in the aforesaid rebellion, which proclamations, however, were attended with prudential reservations and exceptions, then deemed necessary and proper, and which proclamations were respectively issued on the 8th day of December, 1863, on the 26th day of March, 1864, on the 29th day of May, 1865, and on the 7th day of September, 1867;

And whereas the said lamentable civil war has long since altogether ceased, with an acknowledged guarantee to all the States of the supremacy of the Federal Constitution and the Government thereunder; and there no longer axists any reasonable ground to apprehend a renewal of the said civil war, or any foreign interference, or any unlawful resistance by any portion of the people of any of the States to the Constitution and laws of the United States; And whereas it is desirable to reduce the standing army, and to bring to a speedy termination military occupation, martial law, military tribunals, abridgement of freedom of speech and

pardon will tend to secure a complete and universal establishment and prevalence of municipal law and order, in conformity with the Cons.itution of the United States, and to remove all appearances or presumptions of a retaliatory or vindictive policy on the part of the Government attended by unnecessary disqualifications, paite, penalties, confiscations, and disfranchisements: and, on the contrary, to promote and procure complete fraternal reconciliation among the whole people, with due submission to the Constitution and laws:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do, by virtue of the Constitution and in the name of the people of the United States, hereby proclaim and declare, unconditionally and without reservation, to all and to every person who directly or indirectly participated in the late insurrection or rebellion, excepting such person or persons as may be under presentment or indictment in any court of the United States having competent jurisdiction upon a charge of treason or other felony, a full pardon and amnesty for the offence of treason against the United States, or of adhering to their enemies during the late civil war, with restoration of all rights of property, except as to slaves, and except also as to any property of which any person may have been legally divested under the laws of the United States.

In testimony wherof I have signed these presents with my hand, and have caused the seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed. Done at the city of Washington, the fourth

day of July, in the year of our Lord one [SEAL.] thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, and of the independence of the United States of America the ninety-third. ANDREW JOHNSON.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Sec'y of State.

Order Respecting the Transaction of Public Business, December 17, 1867.

It is desired and advised that all communications in writing intended for the executive department of the Government, and relating to public business, of whatever kind, including suggestions for legislation, claims, contracts, employment, appointments and removals from office, and pardons, be transmitted directly, in the first instance, to the head of the department to which the care of the subject-matter of the communication properly belongs. This regulation has become necessary for the more convenient, punctual, and regular despatch of the public business.

By order of the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Sec'y of State
WASHINGTON, December 17. 1867.

Correcting an Error of Date in previous Proclamation, October 7, 1867.

Whereas it has been ascertained that in the nineteenth paragraph of the proclamation of the President of the United States, of the 20th of August, 1866, declaring the insurrection at an end which had theretofore existed in the State of Texas, the previous proclamation of the 13th of June, 1865, instead of that of the 2d of April, 1866, was referred to. Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby declare and proclaim, that the said words "thirteenth of June, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five" are to be regarded as erroneous in the paragraph adverted to, and that the words "second day of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six" are to be considered as substituted therefor.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 7th day of October, in the year of our Lord 1867, [SEAL.] and of the Independence of the United States of America, the ninety-second. ANDREW JOHNSON.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Sec'y of State.

Orders Referring to Reconstruction.t

[General Orders No. 77.]

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[General Orders No. 81.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, WASHINGTON, August 27, 1867. I. The following orders have been received from the President:

(For these orders see page 308.)

II. In compliance with the foregoing instructions of the President of the United States, Major General P. H. Sheridan will, on receipt of this order, turn over his present command to Brevet Major General Charles Griffin, the officer next in rank to himself, and proceed, without delay to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and will relieve Major General Hancock in command of the department of the Missouri.

III. On being relieved by Major General Sheridan, Major General Hancock will proceed, without delay, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and assume command of the fifth military district, and of the department composed of the States of Louisiana and Texas.

IV. Major General George H. Thomas will continue in command of the department of the Cumberland.

By command of General Grant.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT GENERAL' OFFICE,
WASHINGTON, August 27, 1867.

I. The following orders have been received from the President:

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D. C., August 26, 1867. Brevet Major General Edward R. S. Canby is hereby

assigned to the command of the second military district, created by the act of Congress of March 2, 1867, and of the military department of the South, embrac ing the States of North Carolina and South Carolina. He E. Sickles, and, on assuming the command to which will, as soon as practicable, relieve Major General Daniel he is hereby assigned, will, when necessary to a faith

(For these orders see page 306.) 11. In pursuance of the foregoing order of the President of the United States, Major General G. H. Thomas will, on receipt of the order, turn over his present command to the officer next in rank to himself, and proceed to New Orleans, Louisiana, to relieve Major General P. H. Sher-ful idan of the command of the fifth military dis

trict.

III. Major General P H. Sheridan, on being relieved from the command of the fifth military district by Major General G. II. Thomas, will proceed to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and will relieve Major General W. S. Hancock in the command of the department of the Missouri.

IV. Major General W. S. Hancock, on being relieved from the command of the department of the Missouri by Major General Sheridan, will proceed to Louisville, Kentucky, and will as sume command of the department of the Cumberland.

V. Major General G. H. Thomas will continue to execute all orders he may find in force in the fifth military district at the time of his assuming command of it, unless authorized by the General of the army to annul, alter, or modify them.

VI. Major General Sheridan, before relieving Major General Hancock, will report in person at these headquarters.

By command of General Grant.

E. D. TOWNSEND, A. 4 G.

See page 70 of the Manual for 1867, or page 196 of the combined Manual for the proclamation referred to, For previous order see page 73 of Political Mannal of 1867, or page 199 of the combined Manual.

execution of the laws, exercise any and all powers conferred by acts of Congress upon district commandand any and all authority pertaining to officers in command of military departments.

ers,

Major General Daniel E. Sickles is hereby relieved

from the command of the second military district. sary instructions to carry this order into effect.

The Secretary of War ad interim will give the neces

ANDREW JOHNSON,

II. In pursuance of the foregoing order of the President of the United States, Brevet Major General Canby will, on receipt of the order, turn over his present command to the officer next in rank to himself, and proceed to Charleston, South Carolina, to relieve Major General Sickles of the command of the second military district.

III. Major General Sickles, on being relieved, will repair to New York city, and report by letter to the Adjutant General.

By command of General Grant.

E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
WASHINGTON, December 28, 1867.
[General Orders, No. 104.]

By direction of the President of the United States the following orders are made:

I. Brevet Major General E. O. C. Ord will turn over the command of the fourth military dis

rict to Brevet Major General A. C. Gillem, and proceed to San Francisco, California, to take command of the department of California.

II. On being relieved by Brevet Major General Ord, Brevet Major General Irvin McDowell will proceed to Vicksburg, Mississippi, and relieve General Gillem in command of the fourth military district.

III. Brevet Major General John Pope is hereby relieved of the command of the third military district, and will report, without delay, at the headquarters of the army for further. orders, turning over his command to the next senior officer until the arrival of his successor.

IV. Major General George G. Meade is assigned to the command of the third military district, and will assume it without delay. The department of the East will be commanded by the senior officer now on duty in it until a commander is named by the President.

V. The officers assigned in the foregoing order to command of military districts will exercise therein any and all powers conferred by act of Congress upon district commanders, and also any and all powers pertaining to military department commanders.

VI. Brevet Major General Wager Swayne, colonel 45th United States infantry, is hereby relieved from duty in the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, aud Abandoned Lands, and will proceed to Nashville, Tennessee, and assume command of his regiment.

By command of General Grant.

E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant General.

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February 13-The President nominated Lieut. General Sherman for the brevet rank of general, for distinguished gallantry, skill, and ability during the war of the rebellion, to which he responded, as follows:

Hon. JOHN SHERMAN.
ST. LOUIS, February 14, 1868.

Oppose confirmation of myself as brevet general, on ground that it is unprecedented and that it is better not to extend the system of brevets above major generals. If I can't avoid coming to Washington, I may have to resign. W. T. SHERMAN, Lieutenant General. General Sherman from this order. February 19-The President relieved Lieut.

February 21-The President nominated Major General George H. Thomas as brevet lieutenant general and brevet general, with supposed reference to this command; whereupon General Thomas declined in these terms:

LOUISVILLE, February 22, 1868. Hon. B. F. WADE, President of the Senate.

The morning papers of Louisville announced officially that my name was yesterday sent to the Senate for confirmation as brevet lieutenant general and brevet general. For the batUnited States army. My services since the war tle of Nashville I was app nted major general do not merit so high a compliment, and it is now too late to be regarded as a compliment if conearnestly request that the Senate will not confirm ferred for services during the war. I, therefore,

the nomination.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Major General

March 28-Major General Hancock was assigned as follows:

[General Orders No. 17.] HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, WASHINGTON, March 28, 1868. By direction of the President of the United States, Major General W. S. Hancock is relieved from command of the fifth military district and assigned to command of the military division of the Atlantic, created by General Orders No. 10, of February 12, 1868.

By command of General Grant.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant Gene-al.

MEMBERS OF THE CABINET OF PRESIDENT JOHNSON,

AND OF THE FORTIETH CONGRESS.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S CABINET.

Secretary of State-WILLIAM H. SEWARD, of New York.

Secretary of the Treasury-HUGH MCCULLOCH,

of Indiana.

Secretary of War-JOHN M. SCHOFIELD, of New York, from June 1, 1868, vice EDWIN M. STANTON, of Ohio, who was suspended by the President, August 12, 1867, when General ULYSSES S. GRANT was appointed Secretary of War ad interim, and served from that date to January 14, 1868, at which time he vacated

the office, and Mr. STANTON resumed the functions thereof, the Senate having on the previous evening voted a non-concurrence in the said suspension. Mr. STANTON remained in the office till May 26, when he "relinquished charge."

Secretary of the Navy-GIDEON WELLES, of Con

necticut.

Postmaster General-ALEXANDER W. RANDALL, of Wisconsin.

Secretary of the Interior-ORVILLE H. BROWN-
ING, of Illinois.
Attorney General-

vice HENRY

STANBERY, of Kentucky, who resigned, March

12, 1868, to act as one of the President's counsel, Mr. Secretary BROWNING having been the same day appointed Acting Attorney General. (Mr. Stanbery was nominated for re-appointment, after the trial, but the Senate rejected the nomination.)

MEMBERS OF THE FORTIETH CONGRESS.

Adjourned sessions of First Session-July 3-20, November 21-December 2, 1867. Second Session, December 4, 1867-July , 1868.

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Maryland-Reverdy Johnson, George Vickers. Ohio-Benjamin F. Wade, John Sherman. Kentucky Garrett Davis, Thomas C. McCreery. Indiana-Thomas A. Hendricks, Oliver P. MorTennessee-David T. Patterson, Joseph S. Fowler

ton.

Rice.

ard.

Missouri-John B. Henderson, Charles D. Drake.
Illinois-Richard Yates, L man Trumbull.
Arkansas-Alexander McDonald, Benjamin F.
Michigan-Zachariah Chandler, Jacob M. How-
Florida-Adonijah S. Welch, (qualified July 2,
Iowa-James W. Grimes, James Harlan.
1868.) Thomas W. Osborn, (qualified June 30.)
Wisconsin-James R. Doolittle, Timothy 0.
California-John Conness, Cornelius Cole.
Howe.
Oregon-George H. Williams, Henry W. Cor-
Minnesota-Alexander Ramsey, Dan'l S. Norton.

Kansas-Edmund G. Ross, Samuel C. Pomeroy
bett.
West Virginia-Peter G. Van Winkle, Waitman
T. Willey.

Neva la-William M. Stewart, James W. Nye.
Nebraska-Thomas W. Tipton, John M. Thayer.

House of Representatives.

SCHULIR COLFAX, of Indiana, Speaker.
Edward McPhers n, of Pennsylvania, Clerk.
Maine-John Lynch, Sidney Perham, Jarnes
G. Blaine, John A. Peters, Frederick A. Pike.
New Hampshire-Jacob H Ela, Aaron F. Ste-
vens, Jacob Benton.

Vermont-Frederick E. Woodbridge, Luke P.
Poland, Worthington C. Smith.
Massachusetts-Thomas D. Eliot, Oakes Ames,
Ginery Twichell, Samuel Hooper, Benjamin
F. Butler. Nathaniel P. Banks, George S.
Boutwell, John D. Baldwin, William B. Wash-
burn, Henry L. Dawes

Rhode Island-Thomas A. Jenckes, Nathan F.

Dixon.

Connecticut-Richard D Hubbard, Julius Hotchkiss, Henry H. Starkweather, William H. Barnum.

New York-Stephen Taber. Demas Barnes, Wil liam E. Robinson, John Fox. John Morrissey, Thomas E. Stewart. John W. Chanler, James Brooks, Fernando Wood, William H. Robertson, Charles H. Van Wyek, John H. Ketcham, Thomas Cornell, John V. L. Pruyn, John A. Griswold, Orange Ferriss, Calvin T. Hulburd

*Qualified March 9, 1868, in place of Philip Francis Thomas, who was denied admission, February 19, 1868 -yeas 21, nays 28.

Delaware-James A. Bayard, Willard Sauls-rie, bury.

Qualified February 28, 1868, in place of James Guth

resigned February 10, 1868.

Qualified June 23, 1868.
Qualified July 3, 1867.

Messrs. Hotchkiss and Starkweather qualified *Qualified April 11, 1867, at special session, in place July 3, 1867; Mers. Barnum and Hubbard, July 11 of George Read Riddle, deceased.

1867.

James M. Marvin, William C. Fields, Addison ↑ Indiana-William E. Niblack, Michael C. Kerr, H. Laflin, Alexander H. Bailey, John C. * Churchill, Dennis McCarthy, Theodore M. Pomeroy, William H. Kelsey, William S. Lincoln Hamilton Ward, Lewis Selye, Burt Van Horn, James M. Humphrey, Henry Van

Aernam.

New Jersey-William Moore, Charles Haight, Charles Sitgreaves, John Hill, George A. Hal

sey.

Pennsylvania-Samuel J. Randall, Charles O'-
Neill, Leonard Myers, William D. Kelley, Ca-
leb N. Taylor, Benjamin M. Boyer, John M.
Broomall, J. Lawrence Getz, Thaddeus Stevens,
Henry L. Cake, Daniel M. Van Auken, George
W. Woodward,t Ulysses Mercur, George F.
Miller, Adam J. Glossbrenner, William H.
Koontz, Daniel J. Morrell, Stephen F Wilson,
Glenni W. Scofield, Darwin A. Finney, John
Covode, James K. Moorhead, Thomas Wil-
liams, George V. Lawrence.
Delaware-John A. Nicholson.
Maryland-Hiram McCullough, Stevenson Arch-
er, Charles E. Phelps, Francis Thomas, Fred-
erick Stone.

Ohio-Benjamin Eggleston, Samuel F. Cary.
Robert C. Schenck, William Lawrence, Wil-
liam Mungen, Reader W. Clarke, Samuel Shel-
labarger, John Beatty,|| Ralph P. Buckland,
James M. Ashley, John T. Wilson, Philadelph
VanTrump, Columbus Delano, Martin Welker,
Tobias A. Plants, John A. Bingham, Ephraim
R. Eckley, Rufus P. Spalding. James A. Garfield.
Kentuckyawrence S. Trimble. (vacancy.)
Jacob S. Golladay, J. Proctor Knott, Asa P.
Grover, Thomas L. Jones. James B. Beck,
George M. Adams, Samuel McKee.
Tennessee** Roderick R. Butler, Horace May-
nard, William B. Stokes, James Mullins,
John Trimble, Samuel M. Arnell, Isaac R.
Hawkins, David A. Nunn.

Morton C. Hunter, William S. Holman, George W. Julian, John Coburn, Henry D. Washburn, Godlove S. Orth, Schuyler Colfax, William Williams, John P. C. Shanks. Illinois-Norman B. Judd, John F. Farnsworth, Ellihu B. Washburne,* Abner C. Harding, Ebon C. Ingersoll, Burton C. Cook, Henry P. H. Bromwell, Shelby M. Cullom, Lewis W. Ross, Albert G. Burr, Samuel S. Marshall, Jehu Baker, Green B. Raum, John A. Logan. Missouri-William A. Pile, Carman A. Newcomb, James R. McCormick,† Joseph J. Gravely, Joseph W. McClurg, Robert T. Van Horn, Benjamin F. Loan, John F. Benjamin, George W. Anderson.

Arkansas-Logan H. Roots, James Hinds, Thomas Boles.

Michigan-Fernando C. Beaman, Charles Upson, Austin Blair, Thomas W. Ferry, Rowland E. Trowbridge, John F. Driggs. Florida-Charles M. Hamilton, (qualified July 1, 1868.)

Iowa-James F. Wilson, Hiram Price, William B. Allison, William Loughridge, Grenville M. Dodge, Asahel W. Hubbard.

Wisconsin-Halbert E. Paine, Benjamin F. Hop-
kins, Amasa Cobb, Charles A Eldridge, Phile-
tus Sawyer, Cadwalader C. Washburn.
California ||-Samuel B. Axtell, William Higby,
James A. Johnson.
Minnesota-William Windom, Ignatius Don-
nelly.

Oregon-Pufus Mallory.
Kansas-Sidney Clarke.

West Virginia-Chester D. Hubbard, Bethuel
M. Kitchen, Daniel Polsley.
Nevada-Delos R. Ashley.
Nebraska-John Taffe.

The following persons were elected to the House of Representatives at the election held on the constitutions of their respective States: North Carolina-John R. French, David Hea+ Qualified November 21, 1867, in place of Charleston, Oliver H. Dockery, John T. Deweese, Israel

Qualified November 30, 1867.

Denison. deceased.

Qualified November 21, 1867, in place of Rutherford B. Hayes, resigned.

Qualified February 5, 1868, in place of Cornelius

8. Hamilton, killed December 22, 1867.

June 3, 1868, Mr. Delano qualified, in place of George W. Morgan, the House having voted-36 to 79 that Mr. Morgan was not entitled, and-80 to 38-that Mr. Delano was entitled to the seat.

¶ Mr. Adams qualified July 8, 1867. Messrs. Beck, Grover, and Jones qualified Dec. 3, Mr. Knott Dec. 4. Mr. Golladay Dec. 5, and Mr. Trimble January 10, 1868. Mr. John Young Brown, claiming a seat for the second district, was voted, February 13-43 to 108not entitled thereto, by reason of having voluntarily given aid, countenance, counsel, and encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility to the United States; and February 15, the House voted-30 to 102that Samuel E. Smith, not having received a majority of the votes cast for Representative, was not elected. The Speaker was directed to notify the Governor of Kentucky of the vacancy in the second district, but no election was called by him. Mr. McKee qualified June 22, 1868, the House having, June 22, voted-90 to 30--that John D. Young was not entitled to the seat, and that Samuel McKee was entitled to it.

**Messrs. Maynard, Stokes, Mullins, John Trimble, Hawkins, and Nunn qualified November 21, 1867; Mr. A-nell, Iovember 25; Mr. Butler, June 26, 1868.

G. Lash, Nathaniel Boyden, Alexander H. Jones. C. Bowen, Simon Corley, James H. Goss. (Also South Carolina-Benjamin F. Whittemore, C two elected at large: J. P. M. Epping, Elias H. Dickson.)

Georgia-J. W. Clift, Nelson Tift, William P. Edwards, Samuel F. Gove, Charles H. Prince, John H. Christy, P. M. B. Young.

Louisiana-J. Hale Sypher, James Mann, Joseph P. Newsham, Michel Vidal, W. Jasper Blackburn.

Alabama-Francis W. Kellogg, Charles W. Buckley, Benjamin W. Norris, Charles W. Pierce, John B. Callis, Thomas Ilaughey.

* Mr. Washburne having been absent at the previous session, qualified November 21, 1867.

+ Qualified December 17, 1867, vice Thomas E. Noell, deceased.

Qualified June 23, 1868, the bill declaring Arkansas entitled to representation having become a law June 22, 1868. Qualified November 21, 1867.

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