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be made upon the Firths, or along the coasts of Scotland, and to London, in steam-vessels regularly employed in the conveyance of passengers. The islands to be visited are noticed, together with the towns and striking objects to be described upon the coast.

In the execution of this Work, the Publishers have spared neither pains nor expense ; and they flatter themselves they have succeeded, at least in combining simplicity of arrangement with accuracy of detail. The descriptions of scenery are in general the result of actual observation ; and the historical and satistical notices have been derived from works of the highest authority.

In the Second Edition much original matter was incorporated, and other alterations made, which the Publishers found materially improved the work. Three new plates and a chart of the Steam-Boat Tour to London were also given.

In preparing the Third Edition for the Press, great expense was incurred. Most of the interesting scenery described was visited for the express purpose, and former accounts cancelled, particularly those of Loch-Lomond, Loch-Katrine, Loch-Tay, the Clyde, the Tweed, and their tributaries. There are four engraved maps of the principal routes on a new plan, which were not got ready in time for the Second Edition when published. Two more views were given, the one of Abbotsford, the other of Hawthornden.

Much difficulty was found in ascertaining the proprietors' names of places, and no doubt, in several instances, mistakes occur ; but in a country like this, where property so often changes hands, this is scarcely to be avoided. In other respects it is hoped the book will be found a correct and useful topographical guide.

In this Fourth Edition very considerable alterations and additions have been made,—the Map of Scotland has been re-engraved on steel, and several improvements introduced; the Mail Coach, Post-Office Roads, and Stages where Post Horses can be had are distinctly pointed out. These, it is hoped, will render this book still more deserving of that decided preference hitherto awarded to it.

To the Tourist who is unacquainted with the masculine beauties of Highland scenery, no description can give him a correct idea of it; he must see it to feel its influence ; here are no cowslip, daisy, or rosemary, that banquet and enrich the beautiful glens and meadows of the lowlands: these, too, must also be seen to be enjoyed.

The index, by which scenery of every kind delights or astonishes, is the eye, and the impression made upon the mind of the observer entirely depends upon education, habit, and association. Some there are who will be more delighted by a landscape of steeples and chimney-tops, with a canopy of coal smoke, than by rugged mountains, fairy lakes, serpentine rivers, and all the concomitants of the sublime and beautiful in nature. To such we say, remain at home; for the voluptuous stile of magnificent scenery can never be enjoyed by thee.

Edinburgh, December 1831.

* The Publishers of the SCOTTISH TOURIST and ITINERARY respectfully solicit corrections and suggestions for the improvement of future editions of the Work, and beg to return their thanks to W. a correspondent of the ScoTSMAN, for his hints and the use made of his contributions that have appeared in that Journal.

CONTENTS.

kirk, 47—Carron Iron-works, 49—Bannockburn, 53–St Ninian's,

55-Stirling, 56_View from Stirling Castle, 61-Dunblane, 64-

Ardoch, 65—Bridge of Allan, 69–Doune, 70-Callander, 73

Bracklinn Bridge, 75–Loch Vennachar, 75—Glenfinlas, 78-Loch

Achray, 78—The Trosachs, 79_Benvenue, 79_Ben-an, 79-Loch

Katrine, 82—Route from Loch Katrine to Loch Lomond, note, 85

-Pass of Leney, 86_Lochearnhead, 88_Killin, 95-Loch Tay,

96_Kenmore, 98—Taymouth, 99—Aberfeldy, 103_Dunkeld, 105

-Perth, 115—Environs of Perth, 118—Scone, 118—Methven

Castle, 122—Lynedoch, 123—Luncarty, 123—Kinfauns Castle,

124-Pitkeathly, 125-Invermay, 128-Dupplin Castle, 129

Kinross, 130—Loch Leven, 130—Caldron Linn, Rumbling Bridge,

&c. 132—Dunfermline, note, 136-Inverkeithing, 138_Queens-

ferry, 138_Dundas Castle, 139.

NOTES.

Stirling to Aberfoyle, &c. page 66.
Blair. Drummond, 67_Lake of Monteith, 67-Aberfoyle, 67-Loch

Ard, 68-Loch Chon, 69-Loch Arklet, 69_Inversnaid, 69.

SECOND TOUR.

To GLASGOW, DUNBARTON, Loch LOMOND, INVERARY, Loch

Long, HAMILTON, LANARK, AND FALLS OF THE CLYDE,

page 140,

Falkirk, 141-Glasgow, 141—Partick, 150-Govan, note, 150–

Dalnotter Hill, 151_Dunbarton, 152—Vale of Leven, 155-Loch

Lomond, 16)-Rossdoe, 161-Luss, 16)--Inveruglas, 167—Row-

ardennan, 167–Ascent of Ben Lomond, 163—Tarbet, 168–Inver.

snaid, note, 171-Arroquhar, 172-Glencroe, 173_Cairndow, 174

-Inverary, 175-Inverary Castle, 176~Return to Arroquhar, 178

-Roseneath, 179—Helensburgh, 180—Greenock, 181–Port-Glas-

gow, 183—Paisley, 184—Cruikstone Castle, 186—Glasgow, 187–

Bothwell Castle, 189—Hamilton, 191-Hamilton Palace, 192-

Cadzow Castle, 194—Dalserf, 195—Mauldslie Castle, 196-Craig-

nethan, 196—The Fall of Stonebyres, 197—Lanark, 198_Bon-

niton Linn, 200_Corra Linn, 201—New Lanark, 202_Cartland

Craigs, 203—Lee House, 204_Wilsontown, 206–Mid-Calder,

207-Dalmahoy House, 208.

NOTES.

Dunbarton to Loch Lomond by Drymen, page 155.
Bonhill Church, 155—Buchanan House, 155—Drymen, 155_Row-

ardennan, 155_Drymen to Aberfoyle, 156.

Tarbet to Loch Dochart, page 168.
Loch Dochart, 168— Tyndrum, 169—St Fillan's Church, 169-In-

verary to Greenock, 181–St Catherines, 181–Loch Eck, 181-Ar-
dintinny, 181_Kilmun, 181-Castle of Dunoon, 181_Loch Goyle,
181-Castle Carrick, 181.

To DUNKELD, BLAIR ATHOLL, INVERNESS, THE HIGHLAND

Forts, THE CALEDONIAN CANAL, AND THE WESTERN

ISLANDS, page 210.

Dunkeld, 211-Logierait, 211-Fascally, 213—Pass of Killicrankie,

213—Blair Atholl, 217–Atholl House, 217_Falls of the Fender,

219—Glen Tilt, 219–Falls of the Bruar, 221-Dalnacardoch, 226
Dalwhinnie, 226_Pitmain, 228_Kinrara, 229-Aviemore, 229–
Cairngorm Mountain, 229_ Freeburn, 231-Inverness, 232-En-
virons of Inverness, 234-Craig Phadric, 236_Culloden, 237–
Fort George, 238-Beaufort Castle, 239—The Falls of Kilmorack,
240-Beauly, 241_The Great Caledonian Glen, 243-Caledonian
Canal, 244_Loch Ness, note, 245-Fall of Foyers, 248—Glen
Urquhart, 231-Drumdrochet, 253– Invermorriston, 253–Fort
Augustus, 254–Letter Finlay, 255_Fort William, 236-Inver-
lochy Castle, 260—Glen Nevis, 261-Glen Roy, 262_Loch La-
gan, 263—Ben Nevis, 264-Linnhe Loch, 266—Loch Leven, 268
-Ballahulish, 268—Glencoe, 269—Kingshouse, 270_ Tyndrum,
270— Dalmally, 271_Loch Awe, 272_Taynuilt, 274-Bunaw,
note, 274–Loch Etive, 275—Dunstaffnage Castle, 276_Dunolly
Castle, 277–Oban, 278—Route from Oban to Staffa, &c. note,
278—The Hebrides, or Western Islands, 279~Kerrera, 281-
Lismore, 282-Duart Castle, 283_Sound of Mull, 283–Ardtor.
nish Castle, 284-Aros, 285—Island of Mull, 285-Ulva, 287-
Staffa, 287-Iona, or Icolmkill, 329_Return to Oban, 300-Port.
sonachan, 300-Inverary, 300.

NOTES.

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