The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Henry VI, Pt. 1-2

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Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012 - 220 páginas
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1880 Excerpt: ... Stan. Madam, your penance done, throw off this sheet, And go we to attire you for our journey. Ditch. My shame will not be shifted with my sheet: No, it will hang upon my richest robes, And show itself, attire me how I can. Go, lead the way; I long to see my prison. Exeunt. ACT III. Scene I.---The Abbey at Bury St. Edmund's. Sennet. Enter, to the Parliament, King Henry, Queen Margaret, Cardinal Beaufort, Suffolk, York, BuckingHam, and others. King. I muse 1 my Lord of Gloster is not come: Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man, Whate'er occasion keeps him from us now. Queen. Can you not see? or will ye not observe The strangeness of his alter'd countenance? With what a majesty he bears himself; How insolent of late he is become, How proud, how peremptory, and unlike himself? We know the time since 2 he was mild and affable; And, if we did but glance a far-off look, Immediately he was upon his knee, That all the Court admired him for submission: But meet him now, and, be it in the morn, When every one will give the time of day, He knits his brow, and shows an angry eye, 1 " I muse" is I wonder, I marvel. A frequent usage. 2 Since is here equivalent to when. See voi. iii. page 29, note 23. And passeth by with stiff unbowed knee, Disdaining duty that to us belongs. Small curs are not regarded when they grin; But great men tremble when the lion roars, --And Humphrey is no little man in England. First note, that he is near you in descent; And, should you fall, he is the next will mount. Me seemeth, then, it is no policy, --Respecting3 what a rancorous mind he bears, And his advantage following your decease, --That he should come about your royal person, Or be admitted to your Highness' Council. By flattery hath he won the commons' hearts; And, when he please to ma...

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William Shakespeare, 1564 - 1616 Although there are many myths and mysteries surrounding William Shakespeare, a great deal is actually known about his life. He was born in Stratford-Upon-Avon, son of John Shakespeare, a prosperous merchant and local politician and Mary Arden, who had the wealth to send their oldest son to Stratford Grammar School. At 18, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, the 27-year-old daughter of a local farmer, and they had their first daughter six months later. He probably developed an interest in theatre by watching plays performed by traveling players in Stratford while still in his youth. Some time before 1592, he left his family to take up residence in London, where he began acting and writing plays and poetry. By 1594 Shakespeare had become a member and part owner of an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men, where he soon became the company's principal playwright. His plays enjoyed great popularity and high critical acclaim in the newly built Globe Theatre. It was through his popularity that the troupe gained the attention of the new king, James I, who appointed them the King's Players in 1603. Before retiring to Stratford in 1613, after the Globe burned down, he wrote more than three dozen plays (that we are sure of) and more than 150 sonnets. He was celebrated by Ben Jonson, one of the leading playwrights of the day, as a writer who would be "not for an age, but for all time," a prediction that has proved to be true. Today, Shakespeare towers over all other English writers and has few rivals in any language. His genius and creativity continue to astound scholars, and his plays continue to delight audiences. Many have served as the basis for operas, ballets, musical compositions, and films. While Jonson and other writers labored over their plays, Shakespeare seems to have had the ability to turn out work of exceptionally high caliber at an amazing speed. At the height of his career, he wrote an average of two plays a year as well as dozens of poems, songs, and possibly even verses for tombstones and heraldic shields, all while he continued to act in the plays performed by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. This staggering output is even more impressive when one considers its variety. Except for the English history plays, he never wrote the same kind of play twice. He seems to have had a good deal of fun in trying his hand at every kind of play. Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, all published on 1609, most of which were dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothsley, The Earl of Southhampton. He also wrote 13 comedies, 13 histories, 6 tragedies, and 4 tragecomedies. He died at Stratford-upon-Avon April 23, 1616, and was buried two days later on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. His cause of death was unknown, but it is surmised that he knew he was dying.

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