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Such men my friends than enemies. Go on,
And see if Brutus be alive or dead;
And bring us word unto Octavius' tent,
How every thing hath chanc'd. [Ereunt.

Enter BRUTUs, DECIUs, METELLUs, and CINNA.

Bru. Come, poor remains of friends, rest here. Slaying is the word; It is a deed in fashion. Hark thee, Decius. [Whispering. Dec. What I, my lord no, not for all the world. Bru. Peace then, no words. Dec. I'll rather kill myself. Bru. Come hither, good Metellus; list a word. Met. What says my lord Bru. Why, this, Metellus; The ghost of Caesar hath appear'd to me, Two several times by night; at Sardis once; And, this last night, here in Philippi fields. I know my hour is come. Met. Not so, my lord. Bru. Nay, I am sure it is, Metellus. Thou seest the world, Metellus, how it goes; Our enemies have beat us to the pit : [Alarum. It is more worthy to leap in ourselves, Then tarry till they push us. Good Metellus, Thou know'st that we two went to school together; Even for that, our love of old, I pr’ythee, Hold thou my sword's hilt, while I run on it. Met. That's not an office for a friend, my lord. [Alarum still. Bru. Why, then, farewell; My heart hath joy, that yet in all my life, I found no man, but he was true to me. I shall have glory by this losing day. - Retire, and let me think a while— Now, one last look, and then, farewell to all; Scorning to view his country's wrongs,

Thus Brutus always strikes for liberty.

Poor slavish Rome, farewell.

Caesar, now be still ;

I kill'd not thee with half so good a will. Oh
[He runs on his Sword, and dies.

Enter ANTONY and OCTAvius, with TREBONIUS Prisoner. Ant. Whom mourn you over ? Met. "Tis Brutus. Tre. So Brutus should be found. Thank Thee, noble Brutus, that thou hast Proved Trebonius' saying true. 2- -Ant. This was the noblest Roman of them all; All the conspirators, save only he, Did that they did in envy of great Caesar: He, only, in a general honest thought, And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements, So mix’d in him, that Nature might stand up, And say to all the world; “This was a man!” Oct. According to his virtue let us use him; With all respect and rites of burial. Within my tent his bones to-night shall lie, Most like a soldier, order'd honourably. So call the field to rest; and let's away, To part the glories of this happy day. [Ereunt Omnes.

TIME EN D.

A HISTORICAL PLAY,

IN FIVE Acts;

BY WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE.

As performed at the

THEATRE ROYAL DRURY LANE. .

PRINTED UNDER The author it Y of the Man a Gers

FROM THE PROM rt Rook.

With Rem ARKS

BY MIRs. INCHBALD.

LONDON :

*fti N TED For LoN GMAN, HURST, RFES, AND of MF, PATERNOSTER ROW.

w ILLIAM saw Agr, PRINTER, Lo N. Do N.

REMARKS.

In this little book are contained historical facts, taken from one of the most important eras in the Roman history. These facts include a well-known lovetale, great state negociations, and two famous battles, the one by sea, the other by land. Events, thus remarkable, are here related by a poet, faithful in all historical recitals, and blessed with penetration to behold the inmost recesses of the heart of man; from whence he has ever curiously traced those actions which have made, or marred, his hero's fortune; and filled the world with surprise, terror, admiration 1 The reader will, in the following pages, contemplate the Triumvirs of Rome as men, as well as emperors—he will see them with their domestic habits on; one toying with his mistress, another in the enjoyment of his bottle; a third longing, like a child, for a gaudy procession; and all these three rulers of the earth, ruled by some sinister passion. The reader will be also introduced to the queen of Egypt, in her undress, as well as in her royal robes; he will be, as it were, admitted to her toilet, where, in converse with her waiting-woman, she will suffer

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