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Why so large cost hauing so short a lease,
Dost thou vpon thy fading mansion spend ?
Shall wormes inheritors of this excelle,
Eate vp thy charge? is this thy bodies end ?
Then foule liue thou vpon thy feruants losie,
And let that pine to aggrauat thy store;
Buy tearmes diuine in selling houres of drosse :
Within be fed, without be rich no more,

So shalt thou feed on death, that feeds on men,
And death once dead, ther's no more dying then.

CXLVII.

My loue is as a feauer longing still

,
For that which longer nurseth the disease,
Feeding on that which doth preserue the ill,
Th'vncertaine sicklie appetite to please :
My reason the phisition to my loue,
Angry that his prescriptions are not kept
Hath left me, and I desperate now approoue,
Desire is death, which philick did except.
Past cure I am, now reason is past care,
And frantick madde with euer-more vorest,
My thoughts and my discourse as mad mens are,
At randon from the truth vainely expreft.

For I haue sworne thee faire, and thought thee bright,
Who art as black as hell, as darke as night.

CXLVIII.

O Me! what eyes hath loue put in my head,

Which haue no correspondence with true sight,
Or if they haue, where is my iudgment fled,
That ceasures falsely what they fee aright?

If that be faire whereon my false eyes dote,
What meanes the world to say it is not fo?
If it be not, then loue doth well denote,
Loues eye is not so true as all mens : no,
How can it ? O how can loues eye be true,
That is so vext with watching and with teares ?
No maruaile then though I mistake my view,
The sunne it selfe sees not, till heauen cleeres.

O cunning loue, with teares thou keepst me blinde,
Leaft eyes well seeing thy foule faults should finde.

CXLIX.

CANST thou 0 cruell, fay I love thee not,

When I against my felfe with thee pertake:
Doe I not thinke on thee when I forgot
Am of my felfe, all tirant for thy fake?
Who hateth thee that I doe call my friend,
On whom froun'st thou that I doe faune vpon,
Nay if thou lowrst on me doe I not spend
Reuenge vpon my selfe with present mone?
What merrit do I in my felfe respect,
That is so proude thy feruice to dispise,
When all my best doth worship thy defect,
Commanded by the motion of thine eyes.

But loue hate on for now I know thy minde,
Those that can see thou lou'st, and I am blind.

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CL.

O
H from what powre halt thou this powrefull might,

With insufficiency my heart to sway,
To make me giue the lie to my true sight,
And swere that brightnesse doth not grace the day?

Whence

Whence halt thou this becomming of things il,
That in the very refuse of thy deeds,
There is such strength and warrantise of fkill,
That in my minde thy worst all best exceeds ?
Who taught thee how to make me loue thee more,
The more I heare and see iuft cause of hate,
Oh though I loue what others doe abhor,
With others thou should't not abhor my state.

If thy vnworthinesle raisd loue in me,
More worthy I to be belou'd of thee.

!

CLI.

L

QUE is too young to know what conscience is,

Yet who knowes not conscience is borne of loue,
Then gentle cheater vrge not my amisse,
Least guilty of my faults thy sweet selfe proue.
For thou betraying me, I doe betray
My nobler part to my grose bodies treason,
My soule doth tell my body that he may,
Triumph io loue, fleth staies no farther reason,
But rysing at thy name doth point out thee,
As his triumphant prize, proud of this pride,
He is contented thy poore drudge to be
To stand in thy affaires, fall by thy side.

No want of conscience hold it that I call,
Her loue, for whose deare loue. I rise and fall.

CLII.

IN loving thee thou know'st I am forfworne,

But thou art twice forsworne to me loue swearing,
In act thy bed-vow broake and new faith torne,
In vowing new hate after new loue bearing.

But

But why of two othes breach doe I accuse thee,
When I breake twenty : I am periur'd most
For all my vowes are othes but to misuse thee :
And all my honest faith in thee is loft.
For I haue sworne deepe othes of thy deepe kindnesse :
Othes of thy loue, thy truth, thy constancie,
And to inlighten thee gaue eyes to blindnesle,
Or made them swere against the thing they fee.

For I haue sworne thee faire : more periurde eye,
To swere against the truth so foule a lie.

CLIII.
CUPID
VPID laid by his brand and fell a sleepe,

A maide of Dyans this aduantage found,
And his loue-kindling fire did quickly steepe
In a could vallie fountaine of that ground :
Which borrowd from this holie fire of loue,
A datelesse liuely heat still to indure,
And grew a seething bath which yet men proue,
Against strang malladies a soueraigne cure:
But at my mistres eie loues brand new fired
The boy for triall needes would touch my brest,
I fick withall the helpe of bath desired,
And thether hied a fad distemperd guest.

But found no cure, the bath for my helpe lies,
Where Cupid gor new fire; my mistres eye,

CLIV.

THE

'HE little loue.god lying once a seepe,

Laid by his side his heart inflaming brand, Whilst many nymphes that vou'd chast life to keep, Came tripping by, but in her maiden hand,

The

The fayrest votary tooke up

that fire,
Which many legions of true hearts had warm'd,
And so the generall of hot desire,
Was Neeping by a virgin hand disarm'd.
This brand she quenched in a coole well by,
Which from loues fire tooke heat perpetuall,
Growing a bath and healthfull remedy,
For men diseafd, but I my mistrisse thrall,

Came there for cure and this by that I proue,
Loues fire heateś water, water cooles not loue,

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