Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

CIRCULARS OF INFORMATION

OF THE

BUREAU OF EDUCATION.

No. 3-1875.

AN ACCOUNT OF THE SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION IN
BELGIUM, RUSSIA, TURKEY, SERVIA, AND EGYPT.

WASHINGTON:

PRINTING OFFICE.

GOVERNMENT

1875.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Observations by Rev. Horace Eaton, D. D., of Palmyra, N. Y., on education in

Egypt, Syria, and Turkey, made from notes taken while traveling through those countries...

101

190

LETTER.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

BUREAU OF EDUCATION, Washington, D. C., June 15, 1875.

SIR: I beg leave herewith to transmit for your consideration the following interesting summarized statements of the condition of education in Belgium, Russia, Turkey, Servia, and Egypt, and to recommend that the same be published. Some of this information has been furnished in manuscript to parties wishing it. That in reference to Belgium is gathered from official documents procured in connection with my visit there. The labor of translation has been performed by Mr. Herman Jacobson.

Remote as these nations are from us, diverse as they are from ours in the form of their government and the pursuits of heir people, their experiences unite with ours in bearing testimony to the truth that next to nature itself, education shapes national character and determines national prosperity.

If sanitary science, as it matures, turns to the educator as largely responsible for whatever is accomplished in brain-building, statesmanship, from whatever quarter it gathers facts, finds them illustrating the great responsibility of the educator in building nations.

Agriculture, manufactures, commerce, wealth in any or all of its forms, may be selected as the chief means of national greatness, but the political fabric will be found to rest on a foundation of hay, wood, and stubble if the schoolmaster has not been abroad and laid the cornerstone in the intelligence and virtue of the people. The extent and character of their education will at once shape and measure all else that concerns them.

Education is, therefore, the foremost means to any great national

end.

The education of the people clearly is more and more recognized as a factor in determining the power of one nation to cope with another. England has found German clerks specially trained for commercial pursuits winning success in conducting trade in India over her own sons, who have not had the advantages of similar commercial education at home.

Moreover, if the proposition herein stated, to use education in its broadest sense for transforming the peoples of Central Asia to loyal

« AnteriorContinuar »