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Gliding meteorous, am evening mist
Risen from a river o'er the marish glides, 630
And gathers ground fast at the labourer's heel
Homeward returning. High in front advanced,
The brandish'd sword of God before them blazed,
Fierce as a comet; which with torrid heat
And vapour, as the Libyan air adust,

635
Began to parch that temperate clime ; whereat
In either hand the hastening Angel caught
Our lingering paronts, and to the eastern gate
Led them direct, and down the cliffs first
To the snbjected plain ; then disappeared. 640

They, looking back, all the eastern side behold Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Waved over by that Aaming brand ; the gate With dreadful faces throng'd, and fiery arms : Some natural tears they dropp'd, but wiped them soon ; The world was all before them, where to choose 646 Their place of rest, and Providence their guide : They, hand in hand, with wandering steps and slow, Through Edon took their solitary way

TAK END

IN TWELVE PARTS.

BY JOHN MILTON.

NIGHT THOUGHTS

ON

LIFE, DEATH AND IMMORTALITY

TO WHICH IS ADDED,

THE FORCE OF RELIGION.

BY EDWARD YOUNG, D. D.

A NEW EDITION.

BOSTON: PHILLIPS, SAMPSON, & CO., 110 Washington Street,

PREFACE.

As the occasion of this Poem was real, not fictitious; so the method pursued in it was rather imposed by what spontaneously arose in the Author's mind on that occasion, than meditated or designed. Which will appear very probable from the nature of it. For it differs from the cominon mode of poetry ; which is, from long narrations to draw short morals. Here, on the contrary, the narrative is short, and the morality arising from it makes the bulk of the Poem. The reason of it is, that the facts mentioned did naturally pour these moral reflections on the thought of the Writer.

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