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pursued, by faithful endeavours to cultivate the understandings of youth, and by a steady attention to discipline, it is hoped, that you will have the satisfaction to observe the same effects produced, and that the scene will be realized, which Our Poetess has so beautifully described :

country calls

When this, this little

group

their
From academic shades and learned halls,
To fix her laws, her spirit to sustain,
And light op glory thro' her wide domain;
Their various tastes in different arts. display'd;
Like temper'd harmony of light and shade,
With friendly union in one mass shall blend,
And this adorn the state, and that defend.'

I am,

With sincere Respect and Gratitude,

DEAR SIR,

Your much obliged,

and most obedient Servant,

WILLIAM ENFIELD.

Warrington Academy, October 1, 1774.

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CO N T E N T S.

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THE

ESSAY

on Elocution

Page viii

Reading Works of Taste

xxviii

BOOK I.

SelecT SENTENCES -

I to 16

BOOK II.NARRATIVE PIECES.

$hap.

Page Chap:

Page

I. The Dervise Spectator 17

14. Sir Balaam

2. Turkish Tale 16. 1815 Edwin and Emma Mallet 44

3. Avarice and Luxury 16. 39

16. Celadon & Amelia Tbom fox 47

4. Pleasure and Pain 16. 17. Junio and Theana Grainger 49

5. Labour

World 23 18. Douglas to L. Randolph Home 53

6. The Old Man & his Ass Ib. 24. 19. Othello's Apology Shakes 54

7. The Choice of Hercules Tato 25 20. Eliza

Darwin

55

8. Pity

Mrs. Barbauld 28 21, The Moralizer corrected

9. The Dead Als

Cowper 57

10. The Sword

Ib. 31 22.. The Faithful Friend Ib.

59

II. Maria

Ib, 33 23. Pairing Time anticipated 16.60

12, The Camelion Merrick. 38 24. The Needless Alarm Ib. 62

13. The Youth and the Philo. 25. The modern Rake's Pro.

sopher Wbitebead

40 gress

Hurdis 67

BOOK III.-- DIDACTIC PIECES,

1. On Modesty Spectator 70, 15. On Happiness
2. On Cheerfulness 1b. 72 16. On Virtue

16.
3 Sincerity Tillotson 75'7. On Versification

Guardian 38 18. Lessons on Wisdom Armft. 105

Ś. On Good Homour Rambler 81|19. Against Indolence ;

6. On the Knowledge of the

Epifle

108

World

1b. 84 20. Elegy to a young Nobleman

7. On the Advantages of uniting

Mason . III

Gentleness of Manners 21. On the Miseries of Human

with Firmness of Mind

Life

Thomson 112

Lord Chesterfield 8622. Reflections on a future

8. On Good Sense Melmob

State

-9. On Study Bacon 90 23. On Procrastination Young 115

1o. On Satirical Wit Sterne 9124. The Pain arising from vir-
II. Hamlet's Instru&ions to

tuous Emotions attended

the Players Shakespeare 92 with Pleasure Akenside 116

12. The present Condition of

25. On Taste

Ib. 119

Man vindicated Pope 9326. The Pleasures arising from

'13. On the Order of Nature 1b. 95 a cultivated Imagina-

14. The Origin of Superstition

tion

Ib.

and Tyranny Ib. 97 27. Slavery

*89

Ib. 113

I21

Darwint 123

BOOK IV.-- ARGUMENTATIVE PIECES.

Chap

Page Chap

Page

1. On Anger

4. On the immortality of

2. Virtue oor higheft Interest

the Soul

Spectator 133

5. On the Being of a God

3. The fame Subject

Young 136

BOOK V.--ORATIONS AND HAR ANGUES,

Chap.

Page, Chap.

Page

1. Jonius Brutus over the dead

proposing an Accommoda-
Body of Lucretia Livy 138 tion between Henry II. and

2. Hannibalto his Soldiers Ib. 140 Stephen

Lord Lyttelton 153

3. C, Marius to the Romans, on 8. Mr. Pulteney's Speech on

their heftating to appoint

the Motion for reducing

him General in the Expe-

the Army

158

dition against Jugurtha, 9. Sir John St. Aubin's Speech
merely on Account of his

for repealing the Septen.

Extraction

Salluj 142

nial Act

165

4: Callisthenes's Reproof of 10. SirRobert Walpole's Reply 167

Cleon's Flattery to Alex 11. Lord Lyttelton's Speech

ander Quintus Curtius 146 on the Repeal of the Act

5. The Scythian Ambassadors

called the Jew Bill, in

to Alexander

the Year 1753

173

6. Galgacus, the General of the 12. In praise of Virtue Price 176

Caledonii, to his Army, 13. The Speech of Brutus on be

to incite them to A&tion

Death of Cæfar Sbakef. 178

against the Romans Tacit. 15014, Gloucester's Speech to the

7. The Earl of Arundel's Speech,

Nobles

BOOK VI.-DIALOGUES.

Chap.

Page Chap.

Page

1. On Happiness Harris 180 9. Duke and Lord

Sbakef: 205

2. The same Subject Ib. 185 10. Duke and Jaques

3. On Criticism

Sterne 190 11. Henry and Lord Chief

4. On Negroes

Justice Shakej. 210

5. Rivers and Sir Harry

12. Archbishop of Canterbury

Falfe Delicacy 193 and Bishop of Ely

Ib. 212

6. Sir John Melvil and Sterling

Hamlet and Horatio Ib. 214

Clandestine Marriage 195 14. Brutus and Callius

7. Belcour and Stockwell 15. Belarius, Guiderius, and

West Indian 199 Arviragus

Ib, 222

8. Lord Eustace and Frampton

School for Rakes 202

BOOK VII. -- DESCRIPTIVE PIECES,

Chap:

Page Chap.

1. Sensibility

Sterne 225

4. The Man of Ross

2. Liberty and Slavery Ib. 226 5. The Country Clergyman

3. Corporal Trim's Eloquence

Goldsmith 230

6. The Win

7. Crongar

Ib. 179

Ib. 207

Ib. 192

13.

Ib. 217

Dyer. 235

Page
Sbakes. 275

Ib. 276

1b. 279

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Darwin 294

Ib. 296

Ib. 297

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Chap:

Page Chap.

7. Grongar Hill

Fop

8, Hymn to Adverfity Gray 240 22. Clarence's Dream

9. Ode on a distant Prospect 23. Queen Mab

of Eton College Ib. 241 24. The Apothecary 15. 280

10. Elegy written in a Country 25. Ode to Evening

Collins 280

Church-Yard Ib. 244 26 Ode to Spring Mrs. Barba. 282
II, Warrington Academy

27. Domestic Love and Happi.
Mrs. Larbauld 249

ness

Thomson 284

12 Ode to Content Ib. 252 28. The Plearures of Retire-

13. Ode to Fear

Ib. 286

14. Ode to Truth

Mason 256 29. Genius Akenfide 289

15. Ode to Fancy Warton 25% 30. Greatness

16. L'Allegro Milton 262 31. Novelty

17. Il Penferoso

15. 267 33. Philanthropy

18. The Progress of Life Shaki 272 33. The Rofe Cowper 295

19. The Entry of Bolingbroke 34. The Poet's New Year's Gift

and Richard into Lon.

don

1b: 273 35. Ode to Apollo

15. 274 36. Catharina

21. Hotspur's Description of a 37. The Evening Walk Hurdis 300

157

BOOK VIII, ---PATHETIC PIECES.

Chap,

Page Chiap.

Page

1. The Story of Le Fevre Sterse 305 30. Wolley and Cromw. Sbak. -356

2. Yorick's Death 1b. 315 21. Lear

3 The Beggar's Petition 317 22. Macbeth's Soliloquy Ib. 361

4. Elegy on the Death of an 23. Macduff, Malcolm and

unfortunate Lady Pope 319

Rotte

5. Morning Hymn Milton 321 24. Antony's Soliloquý over

6. Satan's Soliloquy.

Cæsar's Body

7. Juba and Syphax Addison 325 25. Antony's Funeral Oration

8. Cato's Soliloquy

over Cæsar's Body Ib. 366

9. Southampton and Essex 26. The Quarrel of Brutus

Earl of Effex 331

and Caffius

Ib. 368

10. Jaffier and Pierre V. Pref. 333 27. Othello and lago

11. Edward and Warwick

28. Hamlet's Soliloquy on his

Earl of Warwick 337

Mother's Marriage Ib. 378

12, Orlando and Adam Sbak. 34.1 | 29 Hamlet and Ghost

13. Scroop and Richard Ib 343 36. Hamlet's Soliloquy on Death

14. Hotspur and Glendower 1.345 ***

Ib. 382

15. Hotspur reading a Lett. Ib. 348 31. Soliloquy of the King in

16. Henry IV's Soliloquy on

Hamlet

Sleep

32. Ode on St. Cecilia's Day

17. Henry IV and Prince Henry

Pope 384

Ib. 3501 33. Alexander's Feast Dryden 388

18. Henry V. to his Soldiers Ib. 354" 34. On the Death of Mrs.

19. Henry VI. Warwick, and i Throckmorton's Bul-

Cardinal Beaufcit 16. 355 finch

Cowper 392

16. 362

Ib. 330

Ib. 349

ESSAY

ON

E LO CU TI O N.

- Id affert ratio, docent literæ, confirmat consuetudo legendi et loquendi.

Cic,

Much declamation has been employed to convince the world of a very plain truth, that to be able to speak well is an ornamental and useful accomplishment. Without the laboured panegyrics of ancient or modern orators, the importance of a good elocation is sufficiently obvious. Every one will acknowledge it to be of some consequence, that what a man has fourly occafion to do, should be done well. Every private company, and almost every public affembly, affords opportunities of remarking the difference between a juft and graceful, and a faulty and unnatural elocution'; and there are few persons who do not daily experience the advantages of the former, and the inconveniences of the latter. The great difficulty is, not to prove that it is a desirable thing to be able to read and speak with propriety, but to point out a practicable and easy method, by which this accomplishment may be acquired.

Follow NATURE, is certainly the fundamental law of Oratory, without a regard to which, all other rules will only produce affected declamation, not just elocution. And some accurate observers, judging, perhaps, from a few unlucky specimens of modern eloquence, have concluded that this is the only law which ought to be pre

fcribed :

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