Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

CONTENTS OF NO. XXXIX.

I. ELECTOR'S REMEMBRANCER, or a Guide to the Votes of each
Member of the House of Commons, in the present Parliament. Giving an
account of the particular conduct of each Member; with general Observa-
tions, &c. &c. A similar work is published in France, and is of great utility.

II. The Exposé of the Present Administration, in a Pamphlet intitled The
State of the Nation in 1822. Under the Four Departments-Finance, Fo-
reign Relations, Home Department, Colonies, &c.

III. Mainwaring on the State of the Police.
IV. A Defence of the Vegetable Regimen, showing that we were not born
to eat Animal Food, &c.

V. Heathfield on the Debt, Agriculture, &c.

VI. Sir H. Parnell's History of the Penal Laws against the Catholics, to
the Union. [Out of Print.]

VII. On the Controversy between Lord Byron and Mr. Bowles, relative to

Pope and Poetry.

[ocr errors][merged small]

I. Reply to the Pamphlet (supposed official) on the State of the Nation

in 1822.

II. To Mr. W. Pitt, on his Apostasy from the Cause of Parliamentary

Reform ; with 'a Proposal for a Constitutional Reform, founded on Pro-
perty, and subversive of Oligarchy and Ochlocracy.

III. On Liberty, and Rights of Englisbmen. By Basil Montagu, Esq.

IV. Sir H. Parnell's History of the Penal Laws against the Irish Catho-
lics.

..
- V. Prof. Sandford's Decision on the Oxf. and Edinb. Controversy.

VI. Rev. T. S. Hughes on the Cause of the Greeks, Scio Massacre, &c.
VII. Mr. Barker's Letter to Rev. T. S. Hughes on Do.
VIII. On the Police Report, with a Plan for suppressing Thieving, &c.
IX. Mr. Canning's Speech on Parliamentary Reform, 1829.
X. Mr. Lambton's Plan for Reform of Parliament, &c.

TO THE

SIXTH EDITION OF A PAMPHLET (SUPPOSED OFFICIAL)

ON THE

STATE OF THE NATION

. AT
THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE YEAR 1822 ;

CONSIDERED UNDER

THE FOUR DEPARTMENTS

ор

FINANCE, FOREIGN RELATIONS, HOME DEPARTMENT, COLONIES,

AND BOARD OF TRADE, &c. &c. ,

[INSERTED IN NO. XXXIX. OF THE PAMPHLETEER.]

BY JOSHUA COLLIER.

WITH A THIRD CHAPTER ON THE SUBJECT OF

AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS.

« Quis furor iste novus ? quo nunc, quo tenditis-
Heu miseræ cives ? non hostem, inimicaque castra
Argivum ; vestras spes uritis.”

VIRG. lib. V. 670.
What madness moves mere women to destroy
The fond remainders of unhappy Troy?
Not hostile fleets, but your own hopes you burn,
And on your friends your fatal fury turn.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

PREFACE.

The pamphlet to which the present is a reply, was generally understood to be published under the immediate auspices of government ; and the number of editions it passed through, to satisfy public curiosity, on this very ground, authorized this belief, which was further confirmed by its never having been contradicted by the ministerial press.

Its preface being a technical explanation of its contents, the writer of the present remarks upon it, which must relate precisely to the same objects, sees reason to adopt for the most part as his own, putting the extracts between inverted commas, with certain alterations and additions, which will of course vary the sense occasionally. The liberty we have taken in this respect will enable the reader to understand the substance and connection of the following pages, though he may not have the original work before him.

These are therefore observations on what has been exhibited as a general view or of the state of public affairs, from the period of the late treaties to the commencement of the year 1822.

“ The circumstances which compose this review had not before been produced to the public with sufficient fulness and distinctness. If some of the matters have been touched upon, and even discussed in parliament, in answer to the observations of the opponents of his Majesty's ministers, or otherwise, they have been discussed only as single measures, and without any reference to their coherence with the system of administration of which they form a part.”

« The ministers of a free and high-minded country cannot be without a due feeling of the value of public character. They know that in public station, still more than in private life, a good name is connected with the due and effective performance of duties; that character is influence, and that influence is power; and that power from influence will extend its operation, where power from law and authority cannot reach; and that the good will of the people towards government has in all ages proved the readiest means of an effective administration. Under these considerations, his Majesty's ministers for themselves, and their friends for them, must

« AnteriorContinuar »