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was damaging the interests of the State, both at home and abroad. The want of a sound and liberal school system, in any State, is well calculated to drive men of capital, enterprise, and intelligence, from our midst, as well as to deter others from coming among us, as it must be construed into opposition to the cause of education. The law, as it now stands, is a liberal one, and reflects much credit on your illustrious predecessors. But this law is defective in several important particulars, and should be improved by you at once. Time and discussion during the late canvass, have pointed out these defects, and, I doubt not, you are prepared to supply the remedy.

BILL OF COSTS.

The "Bill of Costs," coming up from the different counties in the State, are drawing from the Treasury $200,000 per annum. There is a feeling of indifference in too many instances, on the part of the officers who approve these bills of costs, as the State has them to foot. The offenses out of which these bills of costs grew should be graded, and the smaller classes left with the counties to settle, either in your work-houses or from the county revenue. I call your earnest attention to this great and growing evil, as requiring a remedy, and that without delay.

THE CASE OF ISHAM G. HARRIS.

I advise the immediate repeal of the offer of a reward of $5,000 for the arrest and return of ex-Governor Harris. My opinion with regard to active, original secessionists, and the punishment due to them has undergone no change. But no man has been punished for treason yet, from Jefferson Davis down; and the pro-rebel policy of the President warrants the conclusion that none will be punished. Besides, in Tennessee, during the late canvass, there were worse men upon the stump than Harris ever was, openly proclaiming treason and sedition, and inspiring the people with sectional malice. I advise the repeal of this offer for two other considerations—first, that of humanity towards the family of Harris; and next, but not least, that of economy on the part of the State. The State is liable to be called upon at any day, for this reward, and in return, she would have nothing to show for the outlay.

GOVERNOR'S STAFF.

The number of gentlemen on the Governer's Staff, and the salaries paid them, have been subjects of misrepresentation for two years past. I have, at no time, had more than four staff officers on duty at the same time, and the amount paid them, was the amount allowed by law. The State Guards being for the most part, disbanded, it is my purpose, in the future, to employ only two staff officers—an Adjutant-General and a QuartermasterGeneral. With these, and the one clerk allowed by law, I intend to transact the heavy business of my branch of the public service.

CONCLUSION.

Confiding in the intelligence and patriotism which induced your constituents to send you here, as law-makers, I assure you of

my earnest desire to co-operate with you in all measures you may inaugurate for the common good. Coming here with the heavy majorities you are honored with, your action may mark your session as the epoch in our history when genuine progress asserted its sway in Tennessee. Honored in her past history, and her present claims fully responded to, we shall wipe out the foul stain of rebellion, and we may look forward to Tennessee with the utmost confidence. It will be our highest honor to have jealously guarded the fame of our State-advance her prosperity, and develop her vast resources. Destiny and events, God and history, have assigned to Tennessee an important position in the great work of restoring the Union. Let us uct well our part, and, under Providence, perform the great but agreeable work of fraternity and love, and loyalty, towards the race of man.

W. G. BROWNLOW. Nashville, Tenn., October 8th, 1867.

On motion of Mr. Frierson, five thousand copies of the Message was ordered to be printed in English, and three thousand in German, for the use of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. Frierson, the Message was ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

Mr. Cate offered Senate Joint Resolution No. 4, to wit:

Resolved by the Senate (the House concurring,) That the Senate meet the House in the Hall of the later, at 10 o'clock, A. M. to-morrow, for the purpose of participating in the exercises connected with the Inauguration of Governor elect.

On motion of Mr. Aldridge, the rules were suspended, and the Resolution taken up and adoped, and its transmission ordered to the House of Representatives.

On motion of Mr. Elliott,
The Senate adjourned to meet at 9 o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.

THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 10, 1867.

Senate met pursuant to adjournment, Mr. Speaker Senter in the Chair.

Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Huntington.
Roll called under the rules.

Present,

24 Absent,

-- 1 Senators present, were:—Messrs. Aldridge, Cate, Carey, Eckel, Eaton, Elliott, Frierson, Fuson, Henderson, Keith, Lyle, Matthews, McCall, Nelson, Norman, Patterson, Parker, Rodgers, Smith Underwood, Wisener, Wyatt, Wilson, and Mr. Speaker Senter—24. Senator absent, was:-Mr. Garner.

The Speaker announced a quorum present, and the minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

Mr. Frierson offered Senate Resolution No. 6, to wit:

Resolved, That the portions of the Governor's Message relating to the various subjects therein set forth, and recommended, be referred to the respective Standing Committees of the Senate, having charge of those subjects, respectively; and that said Committees take the same under their earest consideration, and report such measures as, in their judgment, may be necessary and proper.

Laid over under the rules.

Mr. Smith, of Shelby, introduced Senate Bill No. 4, to-wit: “A Bill for An Act to improve the facilities of voting."

Passed first reading, and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
On motion of Mr. Smith, of Shelby,
The Senate took a recess until 10 o'clock.

The Senate was called to order at the expiration of the recess; and,

On motion, took a recess, to meet the House of Representatives in Convention; whereupon, the Senate proceeded to the Hall of the House of Representatives.

IN CONVENTION.

The Convention was called to order by the Speaker of the Senate, who stated that the business before the Convention was to participate in the Inauguration of the Governor elect.

The Governor appeared, and the oath of office was duly administered to him by Hon. L. C. Houck.

The Governor's Private Secretary then read the Governor's Inaugural Address.

The President of the Convention then stated that the business for which the Convention assembled, had been concluded.

The Convention then dissolved, and the Senators returned to their Chamber.

The Senate was called to order, Mr. Speaker Senter in the Chair.

The Speaker presented a communication from the Secretary of State, stating that he had in his possession, some ninety-five Codes, and that he could not distribute them impartially, and asked instructions from the Legislature as to their distribution, as there were more than a thousand officers in the State who were entitled to them.

On motion of Mr. Patterson, the communication was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

On motion of Mr. Cate, five thousand copies in English, and three thousand in German of the Governor's Inaugural Address, with the Message, was ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. Cate,
The Senate adjourned to meet at 9 o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.

FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 11, 1867.

Senate met pursuant to adjournment, Mr. Speaker Senter in the Char.

Roll called under the rules.

Present,---
Absent,---

.24

1

Senators present, were:--Messrs. Aldridge, Cate, Carey, Eckel, Eaton, Elliott, Frierson, Turner, Garner, Henderson, Keith, Lyle, Matthews, McCall, Nelson, Norman, Patterson, Parker, Rodgers, Underwood, Wisener, Wyatt, Wilson, and Mr. Speaker Senter.--24.

Senator abent, was:-Mr.Smith.

The Speaker announced a quorum present, and the minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

Report No. 1, from the Judiciary Committee, to wit:

Mr. Speaker:—The Committee on the Judiciary, have had Senate Bill No. 2, under consideration, and have instructed me to report that it be amended in the second line of first Section, by inserting between the words "said and for” the words “for wages due," and by adding, after the words "hereby are repealed” in the last line, but one, of the second Section, the following:

Provided, That this Act shall only apply to causes where the amount claimed does not exceed one hundred dollars," and with this amendment, that the Bill pass; also Senate Bill No. 1, and recommend its passage; also Communication from the Secretary of State, in regard to copies of the Code of Tennessee, and instruct me to report the accompanying Joint Resolution, and recommend its adoption. WILLIAM H. WISENER, SR.,

Chairman.

Mr. Cary introduced Senate Bill No. 5, to wit: “A Bill for An Act to Incorporate the German Association of the city of Nashville, for the purpose of encouraging and protecting immigration to Tennessee."

Passed first reading, and referred to the Committee on Incorporations.

Mr. Garner offered Senate Joint Resolution No. 4, “A” “Raising a Joint Committee to take into consideration the Constitution of the State, and so much of the Governor's Message as refers to the 16th Section of the Franchise Law, and report what amendments are necessary to be proposed.”

Laid over under the rules.

Mr. Nelson introduced Senate Bill No. 6, to wit: "A Bill to prohibit the making and selling of wines, spiritous or mault liquors within three miles of chartered Institutions or Semina

ries."

Passed first reading.

Mr. McCall introduced Senate Bill No. 7, to wit: “A Bill to change the time of holding the Circuit Court of Tipton County.”

Passed first reading.

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