The School for Widows

Capa
University of Delaware Press, 2003 - 382 páginas
Clara Reeve's 1791 novel tells the stories of childhood friends Frances Darnford and Rachel Strictland, both of whom have lived hard lives as the virtuous wives of improvident and immoral husbands, and of another tragic widow Isabella di Soranzo. The introduction to this new edition of Reeve's novel challenges accepted critical views of Reeve's writing and includes newly unearthed material about the author's life.
 

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Índice

I
67
II
76
III
83
IV
100
V
117
VI
165
VII
199
VIII
247
XIII
316
XIV
323
XV
331
XVI
347
XVII
349
XVIII
351
XIX
352
XX
356

IX
265
X
277
XI
291
XII
305
XXI
358
XXII
363
Direitos de autor

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Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 32 - To abolish a status which in all ages God has sanctioned, and man has continued, would not only be robbery to an innumerable class of our fellow-subjects, but it would be extreme cruelty to the African savages, a portion of whom it saves from massacre, or intolerable bondage in their own country, and introduces into a much happier state of life ; especially now when their passage to the West Indies and their treatment there is humanely regulated. To abolish that trade would be to " shut the gates...
Página 27 - The Novel gives a familiar relation of such things as pass every day before our eyes, such as may happen to our friend or to ourselves ; and the perfection of it is to represent every scene in so easy and natural a manner and to make them appear so probable as to deceive us into a persuasion (at least while we are reading) that all is real, until we are affected by the joys or distresses of the persons in the story as if they were our own.
Página 51 - The business of Romance is, first, to excite the attention; and, secondly, to direct it to some useful, or at least innocent, end; Happy the writer who attains both these points, like Richardson! and not unfortunate, or undeserving praise, he who gains only the latter, and furnishes out an entertainment for the reader!
Página 27 - The Novel is a picture of real life and manners, and of the times in which it is written. The Romance in lofty and elevated language, describes what never happened nor is likely to happen. The Novel gives a familiar relation of such things, as pass every day before our eyes...

Acerca do autor (2003)

Jeanine Casler teaches English courses at the University of Georgia.

Informação bibliográfica