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of THE

WAR OF THE INDEPENDENCE

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| THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

BY CHARLES BOTTA.
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DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, to wit:

District Clerk's Office

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the sixth day of March, A.D. 1826, in the fiftieth year of the Independence of the United States of America, GEorge Alexander Otis, Esq. of the said district, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

“History of the War of the Independence of the United States of America. By Charles

Botta. Vol. I. Translated from the Italian, by George Alexander Otis, Esq. Second edition, in two volumes, revised and corrected.'

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, ‘An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and also to an act entitled, ‘An act supplementary to an act entitled, an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.

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NOTICE OF THE AUTHOR.

There will be found, in the course of this history, several discourses of a certain length. Those I have put in the mouth of the different speakers have really been pronounced by them, and upon those very occasions which are treated of in the work. I should, however, mention that I have sometimes made a single orator say what has been said in substance by others of the same party. Sometimes, also, but rarely, using the liberty granted in all times to historians, I have ventured to add a small number of phrases, which appeared to me to coincide perfectly with the sense of the orator, and proper to enforce his opinion; this has happened especially in the two discourses pronounced before Congress, for and against independence, by Richard Henry Lee, and John DickinSOrl.

It will not escape attentive readers, that in some of these discourses are found predictions which time has accomplished. I affirm that these remarkable passages belong entirely to the authors cited. In order that these might not resemble those of the poets, always made after the fact, I have been so scrupulous as to translate them, word for word, from the original language.

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