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to take no thought about the convention- The music which these people have given alities of this day and generation. And us has been all old, and of that sort which when she is dressed like a man, she walkes gets old very quickly-Donizetti's. We have like a man. No ambling, pacing prettiness; had one new opera, Rigoletto, by Verdi, but a good manly stride, at which men but, with the exception of a pretty romance smile, and women wonder and despair; 'for and a carefully-written trio, it is poor stuff, they ask, how can limbs which have lived and fell dead upon the public ear. and moved and had their being under the A German Opera Company has possesshadowing embrace of petticoats, swing so sion of Niblo's Theatre. The enterprise clear and free? To all this boldness of has been very successful as to money. manner upon the stage in manly costume, The house has been full almost nightly, and Siguorina Vestvali unites a bearing equally the audiences have been more fashionable womanly in the drawing-room. She came than those at the Academy of Music. The here well introduced, and was made much management has been " aristocratic,” too, of in the society of our most estimable and on that very important point-subscribers, cultivated people for some time before she and subscribers' seats. There have been obtained an opportunity of appearing in three hundred of these; twice as many as public. Her first triumphs were those of there were at Astor Place, and fifty more her intelligence, pleasing manners, and than there are in Irving Place; yet the womanly beauty in the social circle. When public are not disgusted, and a certain to all this we add that she has a fine, rich- press has refrained from personal attacks toned voice, and sings with great spirit upon the manager and the audience. Why and feeling, it would seem as if Signorina is this? “For particulars, see small bills." Vestvali must needs have turned the town This German Opera Company has not topsy-turvy. Not a bit of it. The brains been intensely German in its performances of some very young gentlemen, who have -the frequent oceurrence of words ending pheezed and fretted around her, like little in icht being the strongest Teutonic trait steam-tugs round a splendid clipper ship, to be found in them. True, Flotow's which they want to seize and carry off, Martha was pretty well, and Weber's Freymay have softened under her influence; but schutz was pretty badly done ; but the the public, although they always welcome staple has been the French Brewer of Presher heartily, and take delight in listening ton, and the Italian Romeo el Giulietta, done to and looking at her, yet keep their senses into German. Excepting Miss Caroline and their dollars, and will not throng the Lebman, a very conscientious and well-intheatre, even when she and Steffanone and structed vocalist, the artists have all been Brignoli sing together. Who is Brignoli? of an inferior grade. A very nice little tenor, who sings in a very nice little way, and tries to imitate Mario, and succeeds wonderfully, except as

THE DRAMA. regards voice, and vocal skill, and good THOSE who look up as they pass St. looks. The three, with Badiali, form an Paul's Chapel-and who does not !-see excellent company; and, as we said before, upon the front of Barnum's Museum, about either one of them, ten years ago, would the time we write, amid huge transparenhave filled a theatre. But now, we demand cies of the American Giantess, who looks one artist, at least, of the very first class; as if she need only caper a little to shake and that artist must be supported by others the house down, and the Mammoth Girl, as good as either of these three, and by a whose accumulation of feminine fat evifull and well-conducted chorus and orches- dently protects the roof tree from any tra; and we want all this for one dollar. danger consequent upon her capering, Like a lady of whom we heard, who could another huge transparency upon which not find a purse to satisfy her; and it appears a ship, bearing at her mizen peak proved that she wanted intelligence, good a black flag with a death's head and crosslooks, ability to read and write, good judg- bones, while a goodly part of the canvas ment, neatness in dress, and propriety of is occupied by a very fierce-looking genmanner-in short, a good person, a good tlemen, much larger than the ship, who mind, and all the cardinal virtues, for seven wears a peaked bat and wide brecches, and dollars a month.

carries another black flag with another færience

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“like a drowning wr

ten playing at the Paris stops midway in Lenten mortifica

bearded gentlemar Ae of his periodical

he had studied, tion, puts off sack-cloth and ashes, dons

popularity appears to three-pile and motley, and, during the mi

Heidelberg, * Evening after evening,

ed as if ! carême, dances and sings with the frantic

house has been filled with

The case zest of a schoolboy's play during his fifteen

applauded and cheered Mr.

lings minutes noon recess. But New York is

he echo. If strenuous endeavors

chirp more persistent in its abstinence. It was

less, he certainly deserves all he

livi not so of olden time; for those of us who

asined. His playing is more like

th yet write ourselves young remember when

muscular working; and he earns bis all innocent amusements, public or private,

atid by the sweat of his brow, as much as were as openly enjoyed, even among our

ar gintleman of the Anti-Know-Nothing High Church Gothamites, during Ler

party who condescends to come over here (excepting Passion Week, perhaps) ar

and get a living by filling a dirt cart. But any other part of the year, sacred or ser

the time has passed for criticism upon Mr. With the advent of Gothic church-ar

Forrest's acting. He has long since made ture, however-real Gothic, wro

his position and his fortune: and in the stone, which causes note-shavi

former he is firmly fixed. His style is selling churchwardens to talk

well known, and can exercise no influence transepts, corbels and finia'

upon public taste; for he plays to those forty days which usher in ov

who will have such playing from some one, Spring have attained a r

and others cannot be induced to go and the eyes of the Rev. Cr

see him on any terms. Upon each characthe flock to whom he

ter in which he has appeared, the Tribune curds and whey of a

without one has given its readers an elaborate criticism, ten-dom now goes th

generally very condemnatory and very It is for this reas

repartee, gross- just, but in the articles upon Shakespeare's the serried ranks

hal-century given plays, displaying, with a fine appreciaHlouse, which *

and intrigue, tion of the poet's thought, a lamentable demy of Musi

ignorance of the materials out of which

he built bis dramas, and of the purpose measure vacy spite of Steff

*canebatur bera consigned to the stor dould be allowed to

Why will Mr. Wal- with which he produced them. In its and Badial

judgment of Mr. Forrest, the Tribune bas ment bola

but reiterated decisions passed by men of de abd bring their unmanmire oft

nuor the world! He does his

happy to admit. taste, before that journal had an existseemed anexceptionably, and

MR. Burton has brought out a play by the afl

MR. BOCRCICAULT, Janet Pride, in a manner ducte

akende sex with lace, and velvet, and Arendt arukes and lappets; but it is

which ought to give complete satisfaction gene

to the author. Jane Pride is a mild meloreg

and te still to put real men and women
dhe fine clothes: the author has

drama, the action of which is so much thr med that, by filling them with con

broken that the author calls its first two mentional puppets. Mr. Wallack tries to

Acts, the Prologue. Janet Pride, although

she gives the play its name, is but a secondBrezrt, and he succeeds pretty well; at these plays of their grossness and

ary character in it: the principal being

Richard Pride, her father.
het och is the nature of the material with
which he has to deal, that in eliminating

This play is entirely one of incident and its gnusness, he takes away all its little

situation. It has but one character, Pride caracter, and in purifying its indecency he extinguishes all its feeble wit, giving -remarkably well played by Mr. Burtonperforce, decent dullness instead of or at most two; the second being Bernard,

smartness. Pray let us have done the old French watchmaker, wbich was a with this, Mr. Wallack. Give us plays that very happy effort on the part of Mr. Moore. bare kept the stage; do not waste your Janet Pride will add nothing to Mr. Bourstrength in attempting to lug back those cicault's reputation as a man of letters. that have been kicked off it. Or if you although it may bring him some jobs 88 8 must “revive," let us have the Flying playwright. Dutchman.

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AM'S MONTHLY.

elue of Literature, Science, and Art.

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VOL. V.-JUNE, 1855.-NO. XXX.

AMERICAN TRAVELERS..
THE Englishman is at once the most day turns its pages, can easily estimate

rational and the most cosmopolitan the advantage to the world of English of men. Wherever he goes, he takes travel. It is John Bull who has made his prejudices and his tea-pot with him; traveling easy. It is John Bull who but he sees more, and tells his story of has taught the kitchen of Italy to reek sight-seeing better, than the traveler of with the fumes of bistecca, and the other nations. The same spirit and mouldy rooms of the Locanda to own training that sent the six hundred, the the perfume of Bohea. It is John Bull Earl of Cardigan at their head,

who has set up Felix and rosbif in the * Into the jaws of death,

very shadow of the Madeleine, and Into the mouth of hell,"

within scent of the Café de Paris.' It is

John Bull who has put Frenchmen upon at Balaklava, is the spirit which has sent

high-trotting horses, and crowded the the solitary Englishman to penetrate Bois de Boulogne with agonized equesthe loneliest deserts, and to climb the trians, rising in the stirrups, and coming loftiest mountains. In Switzerland, if down hard at the wrong time. It is your guide stimulates your ambition to John Bull who awakens the venerable cross an unfrequented and dangerous Roman echoes of the Campagna with the pass, he assures you that it can be done, tally-ho of the huntsman, and the disfor Mr. Bull, in the year of grace 1810, tant, flickering bay of hounds; and John or in some other traditional year, went Bull who rides steeple-chases over the that very way, and Mrs. Bull' could old granary of the world. He has put hardly be dissuaded from accompanying clean sheets upon continental beds, and him. In the East, it is always an caused continental doors to shut, and Englishman who lived for two or three windows to open. He has introduced years at Damascus, for the whim of the carpets, and cold water. Wherever Mr. thing—and certainly it was an English- Bull has been, he has left a track of comwoman who made herself the greatest fort, high prices, liberal swearing, intelqueen of the East since Cleopatra. ligent observation, sullen endurance, and

The traveler of twenty years since, triumphant achievement. Twenty years who recalls the Guide Book of Mrs. ago, Mrs. Starke was the traveler's Vade Starke, or the curious reader, who to- Mecum. The pilgrim of poetry and

Journey to Central Africa. By BAYARD TAYLOR. G. P. Putnam & Co.: New York. --The Lands

the Saracen, By BATARD TAYLOR. G. P. Putnam & Co.: New York. Travels in Europe and the East. 2 vols By SANOEL IREX ÆUS PRIMB. Iarper & Brothers: New York. --- Another Budget; or, Things thich I Saw in the East. By JANE ANTHONY EAMES. Tickuor & Fields: Boston. Cosas de Espana ; or, Going to Madrid cia Barcelona. Redfield: New York — Art, Scenery, and Philosophy in Europe, being fragments from the Portfolio of the late HORACE BINNEY WALLACE, Esq., of Philadelphia. Herman Hooker: Philadelphia.-Notes of a Theological Student. By JAMES MASON Hoppix. D. Appleton & Co.: New York. Gan Eden; or, Pictures of Cuba. J. P. Jewett & Co.: Boston and Cincinnati.

VOL. V.-36

death's head and cross-bones. The ship is MR. FORREST has been playing at the the Flying Dutchman's Ship, the man is Broadway Theatre one of his periodical the Flying Dutchman, and the transparency engagements. His popularity appears to means that Mr. Barnum has been getting up be undiminished. Evening after evening, a Great Flying Dutchman-ic Revival in the the capacious house has been filled with Theatre-we beg his pardon, the Lecture people who applauded and cheered Mr. Room of his Museum. We do not propose Forrest to the echo. If strenuous endeavors to criticise the Flying Dutchman,-either merit success, he certainly deserves all be the picture or the play: we merely refer has attained. His playing is more like to the Great Revival as entitled to notice hard muscular working; and he earns his among the other Great Revivals of the bread by the sweat of his brow, as much as day,--Mr. Wallack being the reviver in any gintleman of the Anti-Know-Nothing the others. We seriously believe that the party who condescends to come over here Flying Dutchman is as good a play, as and get a living by filling a dirt cart. But worthy of the careful attention of good the time has passed for criticism upon Mr. actors, and generous stage appointments Forrest's acting. He has long since made and costumes, as the majority of the come- his position and his fortune; and in the dies which Mr. Wallack revives. It seems former he is firmly fixed. His style is incredible that a gentleman of experience well known, and can exercise no influence and ability should devote his theatre and upon public taste; for he plays to those a good company to the performance of the who will have such playing from some one, smart, feeble, unnatural inanities produced and others cannot be induced to go and by Congreve and Colley Cibber, and the see him on any terms. Upon each charactribe which followed them. Devoid of ter in which he has appeared, the Tribune humor, devoid of character, without one has given its readers an elaborate criticism, touch of nature, dependent for the success generally very condemnatory and very which they once had upon repartee, gross- just, but in the articles upon Shakespeare's ness and intrigue in a half-century given plays, displaying, with a fine appreciaup to repartee, grossness and intrigue, tion of the poet's thought, a lamentable these comedies have been consigned to the ignorance of the materials out of which grave, where they should be allowed to he built his dramas, and of the purpose lie and rot in peace. Why will Mr. Wal- with which he produced them. In its lack dig them up and bring their unman- judgment of Mr. Forrest, the Tribune has nerly corses before the world! He does his but reiterated decisions passed by men of best with them, we are happy to admit. taste, before that journal had an existHe dresses them unexceptionably, and dazzles us with lace, and velvet, and

Mr. Burton has brought out a play by brocade, perukes and lappets; but it is MR. BOURCICAULT, Janet Pride, in a manner beyond his skill to put real men and women which ought to give complete satisfaction in all those fine clothes: the author has to the author. Janet Pride is a mild meloprevented that, by filling them with con- drama, the action of which is so much ventional puppets. Mr. Wallack tries to broken that the author calls its first two purge these plays of their grossness and Acts, the Prologue. Janet Pride, although indecency, and he succeeds pretty well; she gives the play its name, is but a secondbut such is the nature of the material with ary character in it: the principal being which he has to deal, that in eliminating

Richard Pride, her father. its grossness, he takes away all its little This play is entirely one of incident and character, and in purifying its indecency

situation. It has but one character, Pride he extinguishes all its feeble wit, giving -remarkably well played by Mr. Burtonus, perforce, decent dullness instead of or at most two; the second being Bernard, prurient smartness. Pray let us have done the old French watchmaker, which was a with this, Mr. Wallack. Give us plays that very happy effort on the part of Mr. Moore. have kept the stage; do not waste your Janet Pride will add nothing to Mr. Bourstrength in attempting to lug back those cicault's reputation as a man of letters. that have been kicked off it. Or if you although it may bring him some jobs as a must “revive," let us bave the Flying playwright. Dutchman.

ence.

PUTNAM’S MONTHLY.

A Magazine of Literature, Science, and Art.

VOL. V.-JUNE, 1855.—NO. XXX.

AMERICAN TRAVELERS.. THE Englishman is at once the most day turns its pages, can easily estimate

rational and the most cosmopolitan the advantage to the world of English of men. Wherever he goes, he takes travel. It is John Bull who has made his prejudices and his tea-pot with him; traveling easy. It is John Bull who but he sees more, and tells his story of has taught the kitchen of Italy to reek sight-seeing better, than the traveler of with the fumes of biftecca, and the other nations. The same spirit and mouldy rooms of the Locanda to own training that sent the six hundred, the the perfume of Bohea. It is John Bull Earl of Cardigan at their head,

who has set up Felix and rosbif in the “Into the jaws of death,

very shadow of the Madeleine, and

within scent of the Café de Paris.' It is Into the mouth of hell,"

John Bull who has put Frenchmen upon at Balaklava, is the spirit which has sent high-trotting horses, and crowded the the solitary Englishman to penetrate Bois de Boulogne with agonized equesthe loneliest deserts, and to climb the trians, rising in the stirrups, and coming loftiest mountains. In Switzerland, if down'hard at the wrong time. It is your guide stimulates your ambition to John Bull who awakens the venerable cross an unfrequented and dangerous Roman echoes of the Campagna with the pass, he assures you that it can be done, tally-ho of the huntsman, and the disfor Mr. Bull, in the year of grace 1810, tant, flickering bay of hounds; and John or in some other traditional year, went Bull who rides steeple-chases over the that very way, and Mrs. Bull could

old granary of the world. He has put hardly be dissuaded from accompanying clean sheets upon continental beds, and him. In the East, it is always an caused continental doors to shut, and Englishman who lived for two or three windows to open. He has introduced years at Damascus, for the whim of the

carpets, and cold water. Wherever Mr. thing-and certainly it was an English- Bull has been, he has left a track of comwoman who made herself the greatest fort, high prices, liberal swearing, intelqueen of the East since Cleopatra. ligent observation, sullen endurance, and

The traveler of twenty years since, triumphant achievement. Twenty years who recalls the Guide Book of Mrs. ago, Mrs. Starke was the traveler's Vade Starke, or the curious reader, who to- Mecum. The pilgrim of poetry and

* Journey to Central Africa. By BAYARD TAYLOR. G. P. Putnam & Co.:

New York. —The Lands of the Saracen. By BATARD TAYLOR. G. P. Putnam & Co.: New York. Travels in Europe and the East. 2 vols. BF SAMUEL IRENECS Prime. Harper & Brothers: New York. -Another Budget ; or, Things which I Saw in the East. By JAXB ANTHONY Eames. Ticknor & Fields: Boston. Cosas de España ; or, Going to Madrid via Barcelona. Redfeld: New York. ---Art, Scenery, and Philosophy in Europe, being fragments from the Portfolio of the late HORACE BINNEY WALLACE, Esq., of Philadelphia. Herman Hooker: Philadelphia. —Notes of a Theological Student. By JAMES

MASOx Hoppix. D. Appleton & Co.: New York.--- Gan Eden; or, Pictures of Cuba. J.P. Jewett & Co.: Boston and Cincinnati.

VOL. V.-36

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