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moved by the care of his friends from his dishonourable exile, to one, under all circumstances, hardly more honourable. He was sent (probably by the influence of Mr. Fox, to whom the offensive ode had been addressed) minister to Dresden; and he accepted this office from a ministry which he had individually derided and insulted. It must be confessed that this is not the brilliant part of Sir Charles's life;—we touch it lightly, and should not have touched it all, but that it is necessary to his poetical history, and to the understanding of some of the best and most vigorous pieces in the whole publication. There is one ode in particular, which is called an answer to the Conquered Duchess,' and which professes to be an expostulation with Sir Charles; but the expostulation is so gentle, and the satire it contains is so general and so poignant that we should have suspected it to be Sir Charles's, even if all the editions had not given it as his. There is, however, one allusion in it to the punishment of Diomede, which Sir Charles could hardly have written, or which, if he did write it, is a most extraordinary prophecy of a misfortune uttered by a man against himself;--for Sir Charles did, as the ode writer menaced, lose his reason: if this, ode, however, was not written by him, (which those who have the originals could, we suppose, tell, there was, then, another poet at least equal to Sir Charles at his own weapons, and superior to him in the audacity of using them.

We are tempted to extract a stanza or two (the least offensive we can find) from this sprightly ode,-even at this distance of time we are unwilling to quote his very licentious satire upon individual females, but the two following stanzas, in which Sir Charles's triumphs over the new ministry are celebrated, may be extracted without any indelicacy. Sir Charles is addressed as telling

• How Sands, in sense and person queer,
Jump'd from a patriot to a peer,

No mortal yet knows wby;
How Pulteney truck'd the fairest fame
For a Right Honourable name

To call his -viren by.
How Compton rose, when Walpole fell,
'Twas you, and only you could tell,

And all the scene disclos'd;
How Vane and Rushout, Bathurst, Gower,
Were curs’d and stigmatis’d by power ;

And rais'd to be expos’d.-vol. i. p. 97. But there is another class of Sir Charles's poetry to which we may look, if not with as great admiration, with at least more ap

plause,

plause. These volumes contain several pieces which are wholly unexceptionable in point either of morals or honour; they are less distinguished for brilliancy than their criminal associates, but they exhibit considerable talents. Such is the epistle, already quoted, to Mr. Fox, from which we are tempted to extract a character of Sir Robert Walpole, drawn with, certainly not an impartial but, a knowing and an able hand.

6." But Orford's self, I've seen whilst I have read,
Laugh the heart's laugh, and nod th' approving head;
Pardon, great Shade, if, duteous, on thy herse
I hang my grateful tributary verse:
If I who follow'd thro' thy various day,
Thy glorious zenith and thy bright decay,
Now strew thy tomb with flow'rs, and o’er thy urn,
With England, Liberty, and Envy mourn.
His soul was great, and dar'd not but do well,
His noble pride still urg'd him to excel;
Above the thirst of gold—if in his heart
Ambition govern'd-Avrice had no part.
A genius to explore untrodden ways,
Where prudence sees no track, yet never strays ;
Which books and schools, in vain attempt to teach,
And which laborious art can never reach.
Falsehood and flatt'ry, and the tricks of court,
He left to Statesmen of a meuner sort;
Their cloaks and smiles were offer'd him in vain,
His acts were justice which he dar'd maintain,
His words were truth that held them in disdain.
Open to friends, but ev'n to foes sincere,
Alike remote from jealousy and fear;
Tho' Envy's howl, tho' Faction's hiss he heard,
Tho' senates frown'd, tho' death itself appear'd:
Calmly he view'd them--conscious that his ends
Were right, and Truth and Innocence his friends.
Thus was he form’d to govern and to please,
Familiar greatness, dignity with ease,
Compos’d his frame--admir'd in ev'ry state,
In private amiable-in public great:
Gentle in pow'r—but daring in disgrace,
His love was liberty-his wish was peace.
Such was the man that smild upon my lays,
And what can heighten thought or genius raise,
Like praise from him whom all mankind must praise;
Whose knowledge, courage, temper, all surpris’d,

Whom many lov'd, few hated, none despis’d-vol. ii. p. 146. Less diffuse and therefore better is his character of Mr. Winnington.

}

In him we find unite, what rarely meet,
Parts join'd with application, sense with wit;
A piercing eye, a countenance erect,
Quick to invent, judicious to correct;
Warm to attack, but warmer to defend,
The fairest foe, and the sincerest friend;
Above th' intrigues, and windings of a court,
Acknowledg’d merit has his sure support.
His converse new and just delight affords,
Rich in the brightest thoughts and aptest words;
Whene'er he speaks, his audience is charm’d,

Taught by his sense, and by his spirit warm'd,'-p. 446. Our readers will see in these extracts great irregularities; lines the most vigorous match with lines the most feeble and prosaic; and such is the character of the whole epistle, and indeed, we may say, of all Sir Charles's poetry.

We must pow conclude, repeating our wish that an expurgated edition of this work were printed, omitting all the indecencies, the blasphemies, and the dulness which compose the major part of Mr. Jeffrey's volumes, and elucidating the rest by such notes as should explain the history and brighten the wit. Sir Charles, without any effort on his part, has achieved a lasting fame. He will be always mentioned, and, if a decent edition be published, often read; but of the present work we are obliged to say, notwithstanding the respectable names which the editor has entrapped into his title-page and dedication, that it is a disgrace to good manners, good morals, and literature, and that no man of sense and no woman of delicacy can allow it to be seen on their table.

ART. III.-1. Voyage à l'Oasis de Thèbes et dans les Déserts

situés à l'Orient et à l'Occident de la Thébaide, faits pendant les Années 1815, 1816, 1817 et 1818. Par M. Frédéric Cailliaud; et le Voyage à l'Oasis du Dakel; par M. Le Chevalier Drovetti, Consul-Général de France en Egypte; rédigé

et publié par M. Jomard, &c. Fol. Paris. 1822. 2. A Journey to Two of the Oases of Upper Egypt. By Sir

Archibald Edmonstone, Bart. London. *1822. 3. Notes, during a Visit to Egypt, Nubia und the Oasis, Mount

Sinai and Jerusalem. By Sir Frederick Henniker, Bart.

8vo. London. 1822. 4. Travels along the Mediterranean and Parts adjacent; in

company with the Earl of Belmore, during the Years 1916, 17, and 18: extending as far as the Second Cataract of the

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plause. These volumes contain several pieces which are wholly unexceptionable in point either of morals or honour; they are less distinguished for brilliancy than their criminal associates, but they exhibit considerable talents. Such is the epistle, already quoted, to Mr. Fox, from which we are tempted to extract a character of Sir Robert Walpole, drawn with, certainly not an impartial but, a knowing and an able hand.

6" But Orford's self, I've seen whilst I have read,
Laugh the heart's laugh, and nod th' approving head;
Pardon, great Shade, if, duteous, on thy herse
I hang my grateful tributary verse:
If I who follow'd thro' thy various day,
Thy glorious zenith and thy bright decay,
Now strew thy tomb with How'rs, and o'er thy urn,
With England, Liberty, and Envy mourn.
His soul was great, and dar'd not but do well,
His noble pride still urg'd him to excel;
Above the thirst of gold-if in his heart
Ambition govern'd-Av'rice had no part.
A genius to explore untrodden ways,
Where prudence sees no track, yet never strays;
Which books and schools, in vain attempt to teach,
And which laborious art can never reach.
Falsehood and flatt'ry, and the tricks of court,
He left to Statesmen of a meuner sort;
Their cloaks and smiles were offer'd him in vain,
His acts were justice which he dar'd maintain,
His words were truth that held them in disdain.
Open to friends, but ev'n to foes sincere,
Alike remote from jealousy and fear;
Tho' Envy's howl, tho' Faction's hiss he heard,
Tho' senates frowu'd, tho' death itself appear'd:
Calmly he view'd them--conscious that his ends
Were right, and Truth and Innocence his friends.
Thus was he form’d to govern and to please,
Familiar greatness, dignity with ease,
Compos'd his frame--admir'd in ev'ry state,
In private amiable in public great:
Gentle in pow'r—but daring in disgrace,
His love was liberty—his wish was peace.
Such was the man that smild upon my lays,
And what can heighten thought or genius raise,
Like praise from him whom all mankind must praise;
Whose knowledge, courage, temper, all surpris’d,

Whom many lov'd, few hated, none despis''-vol. ii. p. 146. Less diffuse and therefore better is his character of Mr. Winnington.

}

}

' In him we find unite, what rarely meet,
Parts join'd with application, sense with wit;
A piercing eye, a countenance erect,
Quick to invent, judicious to correct;
Warm to attack, but warmer to defend,
The fairest foe, and the sincerest friend;
Above th' intrigues, and windings of a court,
Acknowledg’d merit has his sure support.
His converse new and just delight affords,
Rich in the brightest thoughts and aptest words ;
Whene'er he speaks, his audience is charm’d,

Taught by his sense, and by his spirit warm’d,'-p. 446. Our readers will see in these extracts great irregularities; lines the most vigorous match with lines the most feeble and prosaic; and such is the character of the whole epistle, and indeed, we may say, of all Sir Charles's poetry.

We must now conclude, repeating our wish that an expurgated edition of this work were printed, omitting all the indecencies, the blasphemies, and the dulness which compose the major part of Mr. Jeffrey's volumes, and elucidating the rest by such notes as should explain the history and brighten the wit. Sir Charles, without any effort on his part, has achieved a lasting fame. He will be always mentioned, and, if a decent edition be published, often read; but of the present work we are obliged to say, notwithstanding the respectable names which the editor has entrapped into his title-page and dedication, that it is a disgrace to good manners, good morals, and literature, and that no man of sense and no woman of delicacy can allow it to be seen on their table.

Art. III.-1. Voyage à l'Oasis de Thèbes et dans les Déserts

situés à l'Orient et à l'Occident de la Thébaide, faits pendant les Années 1815, 1816, 1817 et 1818. Par M. Frédéric Cailliaud; et le Voyage à l'Oasis du Dakel; par M. Le Chevalier Drovetti, Consul-Général de France en Egypte; rédigé

et publié par M. Jomard, &c. Fol. Paris. 1822. 2. Å Journey to Two of the Oases of Upper Egypt. By Sir

Archibald Edmonstone, Bart. London. 1822. 3. Notes, during a Visit to Egypt, Nubia and the Ousis, Mount

Sinai and Jerusalem. By Sir Frederick Henniker, Bart.

8vo. London. 1822. 4. Travels along the Mediterranean and Parts adjacent; in company

with the Earl of Belmore, during the Years 1816, 17, and 18: extending as far as the Second Cataract of the

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