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not duty, but Christ; for it is Christ in a way of duty. As duty cannot do it without. Christ, so Christ will not do it without duty: but of this, enough before.

And as this motion must be strong, so must it be constant; or it will fall short of rest. To begin in the Spirit, and end in the flesh, will not bring to the end of the saints. The certainty of the saints' perseverance doth not make admonition to constancy unuseful : men, as seemingly holy as the best of us, have fallen off. He that knew it impossible, in the foundation, to deceive the elect, yet saw it necessary to warn us, that he only that endureth to the end, shall be saved.m Read but the promises, (Rev. ii, and iii.) “To him that overcometh.” Christ's own disciples must be commanded to continue in his love, and that by keeping his commandments; and to abide in him, and his word in them, and he in them. It will seem strange to some, that Christ should command us, that “he abide in us.” (See John xv. 4–10, and viïi. 31; 1 John xxii. 4, 28.)

Sect.XI. 11. There is presupposed, also, to the obtaining of this rest, a strong desire after it. The soul's motion is not that which we call violent or constrained, (none can force it,) but free, As every thing inclines to its proper centre, so the rational creature is carried on in all its motion, with desires after its end. This end is the first thing intended, and chief desired, though last obtained. Observe it, and believe it, whoever thou art; there never was a soul that made Christ and glory the principal end, nor that obtained rest with God, whose desire was not set upon him, and that above all things else in the world whatsoever. Christ brings the heart to heaven first, and then the person. His own mouth spoke it, “Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.” (Matt. vi. 21.) A sad conclusion to thousands of professed Christians. He that had truly rather have the enjoyment of God in Christ, than any thing in the. world, shall have it; and he that had rather have any thing else, shall not have this, except God change him. It is true, the remainder of our old nature will much weaken and interrupt these desires, but never overcome them. The passionate motion of them is oft strongest towards inferior, sensible things; but the serious, deliberate will or choice, which is the rational desire, is most for God.

Sect. XII. 12. Lastly: here is presupposed painfulness and m Matt. xxiv. 13; Mark xiii. 13, 22; Acts xiii, 43, and xiv. 22; Rom. xi. 22 ; Col. i. 23; Heb. viii. 9; Jam, i. 25.

weariness in our motion. This ariseth not from any evil in the work or way, for Christ's yoke is easy, his burden light, and his commands not grievous :" but, 1. From the opposition we meet with; 2. The contrary principles still remaining in our nature, which will make us cry out, “O, wretched men !” (Rom. vii. 24.) 3. From the weakness of our graces, and so of our motion. Great labour, where there is a suitable strength, is a pleasure; but to the weak, how painful! With what panting and weariness doth a feeble man ascend that hill which the sound man runs up with ease. We are all, even the best, but feeble. An. easy, dull, profession of religion, that never encountereth with these difficulties and pains, is a sad sign of an unsound heart. Christ, indeed, hath freed us from the impossibilities of the covenant of works, and from the burden and yoke of legal ceremonies, but not from the difficulties and pains of Gospel duties. 4. Our continued distance from the end, will raise some grief also; for desire and hope, implying the absence of the thing desired and hoped for, do ever imply also some grief for that absence; which all vanish when we come to possession. All these twelve things are implied in a Christian's motion, and so presupposed to his rest. And he only that hath the pre-requisite qualifications, shall have the crown. Here, therefore, should Christians lay out their utmost care and industry. See to your part, and God will certainly see to his part. Look you to your hearts and duties, in which God is ready with assisting grace, and he will see that you lose not the reward. O, how most Christians wrong God and themselves, with being more solicitous about God's part of the work than their own, as if God's faithfulness were more to be suspected than their unfaithful, treacherous hearts! This rest is glorious, and God is faithful; Christ's death is sufficient, and the promise is universal, free, and true. You need not fear missing of heaven through the deficiency or fault of any of these. But yet, for all these, the falseness of your own hearts, if you look not to them, may undo you. If you doubt of this, believe the Holy Ghost. “Having a promise left us of entering into his rest, let us fear lest any of you should seem to come short of it.” (Heb. iv. 1.) The promise is true, but conditional. Never fear whether God will break promise, but fear lest you should not truly perform the condition, for nothing else can bereave you of the benefit. n Prov. iv. 6 ; Matt. xi. 36 ; 1 John v. 3.

• That salvation is given per modum pramii, Dr. Twisse saith oft, cont. Core vin, is past all doubt.

not duty, but Christ; for it is Christ in a way of duty. As duty cannot do it without. Christ, so Christ will not do it without duty : but of this, enough before.

And as this motion must be strong, so must it be constant : or it will fall short of rest. To begin in the Spirit, and end ir the flesh, will not bring to the end of the saints. The certaint of the saints' perseverance doth not make admonition to con stancy unuseful : men, as seemingly holy as the best of us, hav: fallen off. He that knew it impossible, in the foundation, tí deceive the elect, yet saw it necessary to warn us, that he on! that endureth to the end, shall be saved.m Read but the pro mises, (Rev. ii. and ü.) “ To him that overcometh.” Christ own disciples must be commanded to continue in his love, an that by keeping his commandments; and to abide in him, an his word in them, and he in them. It will seem strange 1 some, that Christ should command us, that “he abide in us. (See John xv. 4—10, and viïi. 31; 1 John xxii. 4, 28.)

Sect.XI. 11. There is presupposed, also, to the obtaining of t). rest, a strong desire after it. The soul's motion is not th which we call violent or constrained, (none can force it, but fri As every thing inclines to its proper centre, so the rational cre ture is carried on in all its motion, with desires after its er This end is the first thing intended, and chief desired, thou last obtained. Observe it, and believe it, whoever thou a there never was a soul that made Christ and glory the princi end, nor that obtained rest with God, whose desire was not upon him, and that above all things else in the world what ever. Christ brings the heart to heaven first, and then the son. His own mouth spoke it, “Where your treasure is, tl will your heart be also.” (Matt. vi. 21.) A sad conclusion thousands of professed Christians. He that had truly rai have the enjoyment of God in Christ, than any thing in world, shall have it; and he that had rather have any tl else, shall not have this, except God change him. It is t the remainder of our old nature will much weaken and inter these desires, but never overcome them. The passionate tion of them is oft strongest towards inferior, sensible thi but the serious, deliberate will or choice, which is the rat desire, is most for God.

Sect. XII. 12. Lastly: here is presupposed painfulness m Matt. xxiv. 13; Mark xiii. 13, 22; Acts xiii. 43, and xiv. 22; Rom. x Col. i. 23 ; Heb. viii. 9; Jam, i. 25.

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CHAP. IV.

What this Rest containeth.

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But all this is only the outward court, or at least not the holiest of all. Now we have ascended the steps, may we look within the veil? May we show what this rest containeth, as well as what it presupposeth? But, alas ! how little know I of that whereof I am about to speak. Shall I speak before I know? But if I stay till I clearly know, I shall not come again

to speak. That glimpse which Paul saw, contained that which is N could not, or must not, be uttered, or both. And if Paul had 1

had a tongue to have uttered it, it would have done no good, except his hearers had ears to hear it. If Paul had spoken the things of heaven in the language of heaven, and none understood that language, what the better? Therefore, I will speak while I may, that little, very little which I do know of it, rather than be wholly silent. The Lord reveal it to me, that I may reveal it to you; and the Lord open soine light, and show both you and me his inheritance: not, as to Balaam only, whose eyes the vision of God opened, to see the goodliness of Jacob's tents, and Israel's tabernacles, where he had no portion, but from whence must come his own destruction : nor as to Moses, who had only a discovery, instead of possession, and saw the land which he never entered. But as the pearl was revealed to the merchant in the Gospel, who rested not till he had sold all he had, and bought it :t and as heaven was opened to blessed Stephen, which he was shortly to enter, and the glory showed him, which should be his own possession.

Sect. I. 1. There is contained in this rest, 1. A cessation from motion or action; not of all the action, but of that which hath the nature of a means, and implies the absence of the end. Winen we have obtained the haven, we have done sailing. When the workman hath his wages, it is implied he hath done his work. When we are at our journey's end, we have done with the way. All motion ends at the centre, and all means cease when we have the end. Therefore, prophesying ceaseth, tongues fail, and knowledge shall be done away; that is, so far

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4 2 Cor. xii. 4.
s Deut. xxxiv. 1-4. -
u Acts vii. 55, 56.

Num. xxiv, 15, and xvi. 5. * Matt. xiii, 44-46.

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