Institutes of Grammar, as applicable to the English language, or as introductory to the study of other languages. To which are added chronological tables

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Black, Parbury, and Allen, 1817 - 129 páginas

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Página 113 - When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening
Página 114 - The oaks of the mountains fall; the mountains themselves decay with years; the ocean shrinks and grows again; the moon herself is lost in heaven : but thou art for ever the same, rejoicing in the brightness of thy course.
Página 114 - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel, by divine command, With rising tempests shakes a guilty land (Such as of late o'er pale Britannia passed), Calm and serene he drives the furious blast ; And, pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
Página 106 - The poet's eye in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heav'n to earth, from earth to heav'n ; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shape, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name.
Página 114 - But O, my muse ! what numbers wilt thou find To sing the furious troops in battle join'd ? Methinks I hear the drum's tumultuous sound, The victor's shouts and dying groans confound ; The dreadful burst of cannon rend the skies, And all the thunders of the battle rise.
Página 114 - O thou that rollest above, round as the shield of my fathers! Whence are thy beams, O sun! thy everlasting light? Thou comest forth, in thy awful beauty; the stars hide themselves in the sky; the moon, cold and pale, sinks in the western wave. But thou thyself movest alone; who can be a companion of thy course!
Página 114 - But neither breath of morn, when she ascends With charm of earliest birds; nor rising sun On this delightful land; nor herb, fruit, flower, Glistering with dew; nor fragrance after showers; Nor grateful evening mild; nor silent night With this her solemn bird; nor walk by moon, Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet.
Página 114 - When the world is dark with tempests, when thunder rolls and lightning flies, thou lookest in thy beauty from the clouds, and laughest at the storm. But to Ossian thou lookest in vain, for he beholds thy beams no more; whether thy yellow hair flows on the eastern clouds, or thou tremblest at the gates of the west. But thou art perhaps like me for a season ; thy years will have an end. Thou shalt sleep in thy clouds careless of the voice of the morning.
Página 74 - If the substantives be of different persons, the verb plural must agree with the first person rather than the second, and with the second rather than the third ; as...
Página 105 - There is no enjoyment of property without government, no government without a magistrate, no magistrate without obedience, and no obedience where every one acts as he pleases.

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