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ARTICLE V.

As long as the lands, now ceded, remain the proReservation to hunt. &c. perty of the United States, the said tribe shall have

the privilege of living and hunting upon them, in the same manner that they have heretofore done; and they reserve to themselves the right of locating a tract of two square miles, or twelve hundred and eighty acres, the fee of which is to remain with them forever.

Fort Wayne,
30 Sept.
1809.

A Treaty between the United States of America,

and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Pottawatimies, Miamis and Eel-rider Miamis.

ARTICLE I.

Cession of

territory.

The Miami and Eel.river tribes, and the Dela. wares and Pottawarimies, as their allies, agree to cede to the United States all that tract of country which shall be included between the boundary line esta. blished by the treaty of fort Wayne, the Wabash and a line to be drawn from the mouth of a creek, called Racoon creek, emptying into the Wabash, on the south-east side, about twelve miles below the mouth of the Vermilion river, so as to strike the boundary line established by the treaty of Grouseland, at such a distance from its commencement at the north-east corner of the Vincennes tract, as will leave the tract, now ceded, thirty miles wide at the narrowest place. And also, all that tract which shall be included be. tween the following boundaries, vie : beginning at fort Recovery, thence southwardly along the general boundary line, established by the treaty of Greeneville, to its intersection with the boundary line esta. blished by the treaty of Grouseland; thence along said line to a point from which a line drawn parallel to the first mentioned line will be twelve miles distant from the same, and along the said parallel line to its intersection with a line to be drawn from fort Recovery, parallel to the line established by the said treaty of Grouseland.

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The Miamis explicitly acknowledge the equal. right of the Delawares, with themselves, to the coun- Miamis and try watered by the White river. But it is also to be Delawares. clearly understood, that neither party shall have the right of disposing of the same without the consent of the other: and any improvements which shall be made on the said land by the Delawares, or their friends the, Mochecans, shall be theirs forever.

ARTICLE III.

The compensation to be given for the cession, Annuities. made in the first article, shall be as follows, viz: to the Delawares, a permanent annuity of five hundred dollars; to the Miamis, a like annuity of five hun. dred dollars; to the Eel-river tribe, a like annuity of two hundred and fifty dollars; and to the Pottawati. mies, a like annuity of five hundred dollars.

ARTICLE IV.

All the stipulations made in the treaty of Greeneville, relatively to the manner of paying the annui. ties, and the right of the Indians to hunt upon the land, shall apply to the annuities granted, and the land ceded by the present treaty.

ARTICLE V.

• The consent of the Wea tribe shall be necessary to complete the title to the first tract of land, here ceded; Consent of

Wea tribe a separate convention shall be entered into between

necessary. them and the United States, and a reasonable allowance of goods given them in hand, and a permanent annuity, which shall not be less than three hundred dollars, settled upon them..

ARTICLE VI. The annuities premised by the third article, and Compens the goods now delivered to the amount of five thou. tion. sand two hundred dollars, shall be considered as a

full compensation for the cession made in the first article.

ARTICLE VIII.

Relinquish. The United States agree to relinquish their right ment by U.S. anche racerve at the ai

to the reserve, at the old Ouroctenon towns, made by, the treaty of Greeneville, so far at least as to make no further use of it than for the establishment of a military post.

ARTICLE IX.

The tribes wlio are parties to this treaty, being de

sirous to show their attachment to their brothers, the Conditional

11 Kickapoos, agree to cede to the United States the cession in name of Kic. lands on the north-west side of the Wabash, from the kapoos.

Vincennes tract to a northwardly extension of the line running from the mouth of the aforesaid Racoon creek, and fifteen miles in 'width from the Wabash, on condition that the United States shall allow them an annuity of four hundred dollars. But this article is to have no effect unless the Kickapoos will agree to it.

30th Sept. 1809.

Fort Wayne, A separate Article, entered into at fort Wayne, on

the thirtieth day of September, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and nine, between William Ilenry Harrison, com. missioner plenipotentiary of the Unital States for treating with the Indian tribes, and the sachems and chief warriors of the Miami and Eel-river tribes of Indians, which is to be considered as forming part of the Treaty, this day concluded, between the United States and the said tribes, and their allies, the Delawares and Pottawatimies.

Additional As the greater part of the lands ceded to the Unitcompensa- ed States, by the treaty this day concluded, was the tion to Mia. exclusive property of the Miami nation, and guaranmis.

teed to them by the treaty of Grouseland, it is consi. · dered, by the said commissioner, just and reasonable, that their request to be allowed some further and ad. ditional compensation should be complied with. It is, therefore, agreed that the United States shall de. liver for their use, in the course of the next spring at fort Wayne, domestic animals to the amount of five hundred dollars, and the like number for the two fol. lowing years, and that an armory shall be also main, tained at fort Wayne for the use of the Indians as heretofore. It is also agreed, that if the Kickapoos confirm the ninth article of the treaty, to which this is a supplement, the United States will allow to the Miamis a further permanent annuity of two hundred dollars, and to the Wea and Eel-river tribes a further annuity of one hundred dollars each.

ribe

Vincennes,

26 Oct. 1809. A Convention, entered into at Vincennes, in the

Irudiana territory, betwerr William Henry
Harrison, commissioner plenipotentiary of the
United States, for treating with the Indian
tribes north-west of the Ohio, and the Wea

' confirms fort tribe.

Wayne treaThe said tribe, by their sachems and head war. ": riors, hereby declare their full and free consent to the treaty, concluded at fort Wayne, on the thirtieth último, by the abovementioned commissioner, with the Delaware, Miami, Pottawatimie and Eel-river tribes ; and also, to the separate article entered into on the same day with the Miami and Eel-river tribes. And the said commissioner, on the part of the United States, agrees to allow the said Indian tribe an additional annuity of three hundred dollars, and a present sum of fifteen hundred dollars, in consideration of the relinquishment made in the first article of said treaty; and a further permanent annuity of one hundred dollars, as soon as the Kickapoos be brought to give their consent to the ninth article of said treaty.

Vincennes,

9 Dec. 1809. A Treaty between the United States of America, and the Kickapoo tribe of Indians ARTICLE I.

Kickapoos The ninth article of the treaty, concluded at fort confirm furt Wayne, on the thirtieth of September last, and the

Wayne trea- cession it contains, is hereby agreed to by the Kickaty.

poos, and a permanent additional annuity of four hundred dollars, and goods to the amount of eight hun. dred dollars, now delivered, is to be considered as a full compensation for the said cession. . .

ARTICLE II.

Additional cession.

The said tribe further agrees to cede to the United States, all that tract of land which lies between the tract above ceded, the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from the north corner of the said ceded tract, so as to strike the Vermillion river at the distance of twenty miles in a direct line from 'its mouth. For this cession, a further annuity of one hundred dollars, and the sum of seven hundred dol. lars in goods, now delivered, is considered as a full compensation. But if the Miamis should not be willing to sanction the latter cession, and the United States should not think proper to take possession of the land without their consent, they shall be released from the obligation to pay the additional annuity of one hundred dollars.

ARTICLE III. The stipulations contained in the treaty of Greene. ville, relatively to the manner of paying the annuity, and of the right of the Indians to hunt upon the land, shall apply to the annuity granted and the land ceded by the present treaty.

No. 5.

Saint Louis

Treaty with Sac and Fox tribes. 3d November, 1804.

ARTICLE I. The Sacs

The United States receive the united Sac and Fox and Foxes ta. tribes into their friendship and protection, and the ken under said tribes agree to consider themselves under the protection of the U.S.

protection of the United States and of no other power whatsoever.

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