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of iumates therein, the governor shall make due proclama. tion of that fact; and thereafter it shall be lawful for said board of trustees to receive into its care and guardianship minors between the ages of eight and eighteen years committed to its custody, hereinafter provided. [Amendment, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 329. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 16. When any boy or girl between the ages of eight and eighteen years shall be found guilty by à superior court of any county in the state, and who, in the opinion of such court, would be a fit subject for commitment to the said school, it shall be lawful for the said court to suspend judgment or sentence (except when the penalty is life imprisonment or death), and to commit such minor to the said school for a period embracing his or her minority, unless sooner discharged by law, or as in this act provided; but no minor who is under the age of eight years, or who is suffering from any contagious, infectious, or other disease which would probably endanger the lives or health of the other inmates of said school, shall be committed to said school; and further provided, that no such minor shall be committed to said school unless the judge of such court shall be fully satisfied that the mental and physical condition and qualifications of said minor are such as to render it probable that such minor will be benefited by the reformatory and educational discipline of said school. The board of trustees of said school shall have authority to make rules reducing, as the reward for good conduct, the time for which such person or persons have been committed. It shall be the duty of all courts committing any minor to such school, to certify to the superintendent thereof the age of the person so committed, as nearly as can be ascertained by testimony taken under oath before such court, or in such manner as the court may direct. [Amendment, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 330. In effect immediately.)

Sec. 16b. It shall be lawful for the board, whenever it may deem any inmate of said institution to have been

so far reformed as to justify his discharge, to give him an honorable dismissal, and to cause an entry of the reasons for such dismissal to be made in the book of records prepared for that purpose. All persons thus honorably dismissed, and all those who shall have served the full term of their respective sentences, shall thereafter be released from all penalties and disabilities resulting from the offense or crime for which they may have been committed. Upon the final discharge of any inmate, as in this section provided, the superintendent, where any sentence or judgment was previously suspended, as mentioned in section sixteen of this act, shall immediately certify such discharge, in writing, and shall transmit the said certificate to the court by which such person was committed, and said court shall thereupon dismiss the accusation, and the action pending against said person. (New section, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 330. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 16c. The board shall have authority also to issue certificates of conditional dismissal and parole to any worthy minor confined in the institution, on the following conditions: It may bind such minor by articles of indenture to any suitable person who will engage to educate him, and to instruct him in some useful art or trade, or it may return him to his parents, or it may place him under the care of any reputable person who is a citizen and a resident of this state, after such person, parent, guardian, or resident citizen shall have become bound to the said board, with good and sufficient sureties, conditioned on the proper custody, care, education, and moral and industrial training of the said paroled minor. The time of such conditional release shall be made subject to good behavior and continued reformation on the part of the person thus paroled. Any minor who violates his parole, or who becomes habitually disobedient and incorrigible, may be returned to the said school to serve the unexpired term of his sentence, on complaint of his guardian and the written requisition of the superintendent of said school. Every paroled minor who properly observes and obeys the condition of his parole until the date of the expiration of his term of commitment shall be entitled to all the benefits and immunities in this act provided. If at any time it shall be determined by the board of trustees of said school, to its satisfaction, that any minor who may have been committed to the care or guardianship of any third person, as in this section previously provided, is not being properly treated or cared for, according to the terms and conditions under which such minor was intrusted to said third person, then by a resolution of the said board entered upon its minutes, and upon the requisition of the superintendent of said institution issued there. on, the said minor may be recalled to said school, and he or she shall be released from all obligations to such third person. And in such case the said board shall have the right to maintain all necessary actions or proceedings against the said third person and his bondsmen to recover the penalty in whatever bonds may be given by reason of the failure of said third person to perform the conditions under which said minor was intrusted to his care; and in the event of minors who may have been bound out by the said board of trustees by articles of indenture, the said board shall institute and maintain all proper actions and proceedings to cancel and annul said articles of indenture. [New section, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 331. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 16d. Any minor who shall, during the time of his or her commitment, be found incorrigible, or who shall be, in the judgment of the board of trustees of said school, determined to be an improper subject for detention in said school, may be returned to the court by which said minor was committed, and upon written complaint of the said board, attested by the superintendent of said school, and filed with the original complaint, it shall be the duty of said court to enter judgment and pass such nce as would have been lawful at the time when the said minor was first committed to the said school. [New section, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 331. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 17. If any accusation of the commission of any crime shall be made against any minor under the age of eighteen years before any grand jury, and the charge appears to be supported by evidence sufficient to put the accused upon trial, the grand jury may, in their discretion, instead of finding an indictment against the accused, return to the superior court that it appears to them that the accused is a suitable person to be committed to the care and guardianship of said institution; the court may thereupon order such commitment, if satisfied from the evidence that such commitment ought to be made, which examination may be waived by the parent or guardian of such minor. [Amendment approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 332. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 18. If any minor between the ages of eight and eighteen years shall be arraigned for trial in any court having competent jurisdiction, on a charge of any violation of any criminal law of this state, except for the commission of a capital offense, or an attempt to commit a capital offense, the judge may, in his discretion, with the consent of the accused, arrest at any stage of the cause any further proceedings on the part of the prosecution, and commit the accused to the care and guardianship of this institution. [Amendment, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 332. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 19. All minors between the ages of eight and eighteen years, who may be accused of any offense punishable by imprisonment, shall, with a view to the question whether they ought to be committed to said institution, be entitled to a private examination and trial before a court having competent jurisdiction, to which only the parties to the case and the parent or guardian of the accused and their attorneys shall be admitted, unless one of the parents, the guardian, or other legal representative of the minor demand a public trial; in such case, the proceedings shall be in the usual manner. [Amendment, approved March 23, 1893. Stats. 1893, p. 332. In effect immediately.]

Sec. 20. It shall also be lawful for the said board of trustees, under such rules as they may prescribe, to receive into the care and guardianship of said institution, whenever it may be convenient so to do, minors between the ages of eight and eighteen years, committed to custody in any of the following modes:

1. Minors committed by any judge of a superior court of this state, on the complaint in writing, filed and due proof thereof made by the parent or guardian of such minor, showing that by reason of the incorrigible and vicious conduct or nature of such minor he is beyond the control and power of such parent or guardian, and that from a regard for the future welfare of such minor and the protection of society it appears that such minor should be placed in the care of such institution.

2. Minors committed by any judge of the superior court of this state where complaint in writing has been filed and due proof of the same has been made showing that such minor is a proper subject for the care and guardianship of such institution in consequence of vagrancy or of incorrigible or vicious conduct, in cases where, from moral depravity or otherwise, the parent or guardian having the control of such minor is incapable of exercising or is unwilling to exercise the proper care or discipline over such minor, or in cases where such minor has no parent, guardian, or other protector.

3. Minors committed by any judge of the superior court of this state where complaint in writing has been filed and due proof of the same has been made by the mother or guardian, when the father is dead, or has abandoned his family, or is an habitual drunkard, or does not provide for the support of such minor, and it appears that such minor is destitute of a suitable home and of adequate means of obtaining an honest living, or is in danger of being brought

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