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served with the Barbary powers. This squadron has been reduced the present year to, as small a force as is compatible with the fulfilment of the object intended by it. From past experience, and the best information respecting the views of those powers, it is distinctly understood that, should our squadron be withdrawn, they would soon recommence their hostilities and depredations upon our commerce. Their fortifications have lately been rebuilt, and their maritime force increased. It has also been found necessary to maintain a naval force on the Pacific, for the protection of the very important interests of our citizens engaged in commerce and the fisheries in that sea. Vessels have likewise been employed in cruizing along the Atlantic coast, in the Gulf of Mexico, on the coast of Africa, and in the neighbouring seas. In the latter, many piracies have been comunitted on our commerce, and so extensive was becoming the range of those unprincipled ailventurers, that there was cause to apprehend, without a timely and decisive effort to suppress them, the worst consequences would ensue. Fortunately, a considerable check has been given to that spirit by our cruizers, who have succeeded in capturing and destroying several of their vessels. Nevertheless, it is considered an object of high importance to continue these cruizes until the practice is entirely suppressed. Like success bas attended our efforts to suppress the slave trade. Under the flag of the United States, and the sanction of their papers, the trade may be considered as entirely suppressed; and, if any of our citizens are engaged in it, under the flag and papers of other powers, it is only from a respect to the rights of those powers, that these offenders are not seized and brought home, to receive the punishment which the laws inflict. If every other power should adopt the same policy, and pursue the same vigorous means for carrying it into effect, the trade could no longer exist.

Deeply impressed with the blessings which we enjoy, and of which we have such manifold proofs, my mind is irresistibly drawn to that Almighty Being, the Great Source from whence they proceed, and to whom our most grateful acknowledgments are due.

JAMES MONROE. Washington, December 3, 1821. The message and accompanying documents were read.'

On motion, by Mr. Lanman, Ordered, That three thousand copies of the message be printed for the use of the Senate.

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serted in the class of Senators whose term of service will expire on the third day of March, 1825; and that the Senator who shall draw the paper numbered three, shall be inserted in the class of Senators whose term of service will expire on the third day of March, 1827.

Whereupon, The numbers abovementioned were, by the Secretary, rolled up and put into the box; when Mr. Barton drew No. 2, and is accordingly of the class of Senators whose terms of service will expire on the 3d of March, 1825; and Mr. Benton drew No. 3, and is accordingly of the class of Senators whose terms of service will expire on the 3d of March, 1827.

On motion, by Mr. Lowrie, Ordered, That two thousand copies of the documents accompanying the message of the President of the United States, of the 5th instant, be printed for the use of the Senate. Mr. Thomas submitted the following motion for consideration:

Resolved, That each Senator be supplied, during the present session, with three such newspapers, printed within the United States, as he may choose, to be paid for out of the contingent fund; provided the same be furnished at the rate for the annual charge for such newspapers; and provided, also, that if any Senator shall choose to take any newspapers other than daily papers, he shall be supplied with as many such papers us shall not exceed the price of three daily papers; and

The resolution was read the first and second time, by unanimous consent, and considered as in committee of the whole, and having been reported to the House without amendment,

On the question, “ Shall this resolution be engrossed and read a third time?"

It was determined in the affirmative.

The said resolution having been reported by the committee correctly engrossed, was read a third time by unanimous consent. Resolved, That this resolution pass.

. On motion, by Mr. Johnson, of Kentucky,

It was agreed that, when the Senate adjourn, it be to Monday next.

Mr. Dickerson submitted the following motion for consideration, which was read: · Resolved, That a committee of three members be appointed, who, with three members of the House of Representatives, to be appointed

by that House, shall have the direction of the money appropriated to
the purchase of books and maps, for the use of the two Houses of
Congress.
Ordered, That it pass to the second reading.

On motion,
The Senate adjourned.

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The Honorable John Elliott, from the State of Georgia, who arrived on the 7th, and also the Honorable John W. Walker, from the State of Alabama, who arrived on the 8th instant, severally attended this day.

Mr. Barbour submitted the following motion for consideration: Resolved, That the Senate will, on Wednesday next, at 12 o'clock, proceed to the appointment of the standing committees of this House.

The resolution authorizing the Doorkeeper and Sergeant-at-arms to employ an assistant and horses, having been reported by the committee correctly engrossed, was read a third time; and

Resolved, That this resolution pass.

The Senate resumed the consideration of the resolution for the appointment of a joint committee on the arrangements for the library of Congress; and having agreed thereto,

Ordered, That Mr. Dickerson, Mr. Walker, and Mr. Elliott, be the committee.

Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives accordingly.

Mr. Williams, of Tennessee, asked and obtained leave, by unanimous consent, to bring in a bill authorizing the transmission of certain documents free of postage, and the bill was twice read by unanimous consent, and considered as in committee of the whole, and not amendment having made thereto, it was reported to the House, and

On the question, « Shall this bill be engrossed and read a third time?”

It was determined in the affirmative.

The said bill having been reported by the committee correctly engrossed, was read a third time by unanimous consent.

Resolved, That this bill pass, and that the title thereof be, “An act authorizing the transmission of certain documents free of postage.”

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