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ATES BOS

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In Carolina.

From the State of

Virginia,
The Honorable James Barbour,

James Pleasants.
From the State of

North Carolina,
The Honorable

Nathaniel Macon,

Montfort Stokes.
From the State of

South Carolina,

- John Gaillard,
The Honorable

William Smith.
From the State of

Kentucky,
The Honorable Richard M. Johnson.

From the State of

Tennessee, The Honorable {

S John Williams,

John H. Eaton.
From the State of

Ohio, .
The Honorable Benjamin Ruggles.

From the State of

Louisiana, .
The Honorable James Brown,

| Henry Johnson.
From the State of

Indiana,
The Honorable şJames Noble,

Waller Taylor.
From the State of

Mississippi,
The Honorable

S David Holmes,
| Thomas H. Williams.
From the State of

Illinois,
The Honorable Jesse B. Thomas.

From the State of

:: Maine,
The Honorable John Chandler,

John Holmes.

From the State of

Missouri, The Honorable David Barton. The Honorable Joan GAILLARD, President pro tempore, resumed the chair.

The Honorable Elijah Boardman, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of Connecticut, for the term of six years, commencing on the fourth day of March last; the Honorable Horatio Seymour, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of Vermont, for the term of six years, commencing on the fourth day of March last; the Honorable James D'Wolf, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, for the term of six years, commencing on the fourth day of March last; the Honorable Martin Van Buren, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of New York, for the term of six years, commencing on the fourth day of March last; the Honorable John Henry Eaton, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of Tennessee, for the term of six years, commencing on the fourth day of March last; the Honorable David Holmes, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of Mississippi, for the term of six years, commencing on the fourth day of March last; and the Honorable David Barton, appointed a Senator by the Legislature of the State of Missouri, respectively produced their credentials, which were read; and the oath prescribed by law was administered to them, and they took their seats in the Senate.

The oath was also administered to Mr. Holmes, of Maine, Mr. Southard, Mr. Barbour, Mr. Ruggles, and Mr. Noble; their credentials having been read and filed during the last session.

On motion, by Mr. Lanman, Ordered, That the Secretary acquaint the House of Representatives that a quorum of the Senate is assembled, and ready to proceed to business.

On motion, by Mr. Lanman, Resolved, That a committee be appointed, jointly with such committee as may be appointed by the House of Representatives, to wait on the President of the United States, and inform him that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled, and ready to receive any communications he may be pleased to make to them.

Ordered, That Mr. Macon, and Mr. King, of New York, be the committee on the part of the Senate.

Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives accordingly.

On motion,
The Senate adjourned.

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The Honorable Isham Talbot, from the State of Kentucky, took his seat in the Senate.

On motion,
The Senate adjourned.

The Honorable Harrison Gray Otis, from the State of Massachusetts, took his seat in the Senate.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Dougherty, their Clerk:

Mr. President: I am directed to inform the Senate that a quorum of the House of Representatives is assembled, and have elected Philip P. Barbour, one of the Representatives from the State of Virginia, their Speaker, and Thomas Dougherty their Clerk, and are ready to proceed to business.

They have appointed a committee on their part to join the committee appointed on the part of the Senate, to wait on the President of the United States, and inform him that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled, and ready to receive any communications he may be pleased to make to them. And he withdrew.

Mr. Macon reported, from the joint committee, that they had waited on the President of the United States, agreeably to order, and that the President of the United States informed the committee that he would make a communication to the two Houses this day.

Mr. Lanman submitted the following motion for consideration, which was read:

Resolved, That Mountjoy Bayly, Doorkeeper and Sergeant-at-arms to the Senate, be, and he hereby is, authorized to employ one assistant and two horses, for the purpose of performing such services as are usually required by the Doorkeeper of the Senate; which expense shall be paid out of the contingent fund.

Ordered, That it pass to the second reading.

Mr. Morril submitted the following motion for consideration, which was read:

Resolved, That two Chaplains, of different denominations, be appointed to Congress, during the present session, one by each House, who shall interchange weekly.

Ordered, That it pass to the second reading.,

The following written message was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Gouverneur, his Secretary:

FELLOW-CITIZENS OF THE SENATE,

AND OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES: The progress of our affairs since the last session has been such as may justly be claimed and expected, under a government deriving all its powers from an enlightened people, and under laws formed by their representatives, on great consideration, for the sole purpose of promoting the welfare and happiness of their constituents. In the execution of those laws, and of the powers vested by the constitution in the Executive, unremitted attention has been paid to the great objects to which they extend. In the concerns which are exclusively internal, there is good cause to be satisfied with the result. The laws have had their due operation and effect. In those relating to foreign powers, I am happy to state, that peace and amity are preserved with all, by a strict observance, on both sides, of the rights of each. In matters touching our commercial intercourse, where a difference of opinion has existed, as to the conditions on which it should be placed, each party has pursued its own policy, without giving just cause of offence to the other. In this annual communication, especially when it is addressed to a new Congress, the whole scope of our political concerns naturally comes into view; that errors, if such have been committed, may be corrected; that defects, which have become manifest, may be remedied; and, on the other hand, that measures which were adopted on duo deliberation, and which experience has shewn are just in themselves, and essential to the public welfare, should be persevered in and supported. In performing this necessary and very important duty, I shall endeavor to place before you, on its merits, every subject that is thought to be entitled to your particular attention, in as distinct and clear a light as I may be able.

By an act of the 3d of March, 1815, so much of the several acts as imposed higher duties on the tonnage of foreign vessels, and on the manufactures and productions of foreign nations, when imported into the United States in foreign vessels, than when imported in vessels of the United States, were repealed, so far as respected the manufactures and productions of the nation to which such vessel belonged, on the condition, that the repeal should take effect only in favor of any foreign nation, when the Executive should be satisfied that such discriminating duties, to the disadvantage of the United States, bad likewise been repealed by such nation. By this act a proposition was made to all nations to place our commerce with each on a basis which, it was presumed, would be acceptable to all. Every nation was allowed to bring its manufactures and productions into our ports, and to take the manufactures and productions of the United States back to their ports, in their own vessels, on the same conditions that they might be transported in vessels of the United States; and, in return, it was required that a like accommodation should be granted to the vessels of the United States in the ports of other powers. The articles to be admitted, or prohibited on either side, formed no part of the proposed arrangement. Each party would retain the right to admit or prohibit such articles from the other, as it thought proper, and on its own conditions. · When the nature of the commerce between the United States and every other country was taken into view, it was thought that this proposition would be considered fair, and even liberal, by every power. The exports of the United States consist generally of articles of the first necessity, and of rude materials in demand for foreign manufactories, of great bulk, requiring for their transportation many vessels, the return for which, in the manufactures and productions of any foreign country, even when disposed of there to advantage, may be brought in a single vessel. This observation is the more especially applicable to those countries from which manufactures alone are imported, but it applies, in a great extent, to the European dominions of every European power, and, in a certain extent, to all the colonies of those powers. By placing, then, the navigation precisely on the same ground, in the transportation of exports and imports between the United States and other countries, it was presumed that all was offered which could be desired. It seemed to be the only proposition which could be devised, which would retain even the semblance of equality in our favor,

Many considerations of great weight gave us a right to expect that this commerce should be extended to the colonies, as well as to the

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