Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

metrical form, as seen, for example, in the German Meistersingers and the French lyric poets, is a symptom not altogether favourable, since the practice tends to reverse the natural order of things. Content should find its own form, and not vice versa. There is something predestined in the metre of the great masterpieces.

Closely allied with the end of French monopoly in the lighter sorts of literature is the fall of Latin as the sole, or nearly the sole, gate and garner of the fruits of research and serious thought. The fourteenth century was indeed, for all the important as well as some unimportant vernaculars, an era of complete enfranchisement; or if anything yet lacked of complete enfranchisement, it was the fault less of external opportunity than of inward unreadiness. A folktongue cannot pass in a moment into an apt and artful vehicle of philosophic subtleties or social refinements. Necessarily this is the work of time, and the fourteenth century, notwithstanding laudable efforts, never mastered the manifold possibilities of prose. A flexible prose-style comes not with observation, and to some languages, swaddled with syntactical formulae, comes not at all. Prose, however, though still unripe artistically, was constantly growing in volume and encroaching on the domain of verse, with, at least, this result, that a basis was formed for experiment. In so far as it was not a copy, a blurred reproduction of the past, there is the character of the fourteenth century. It was emphatically an age of experiments. The period was marked by no strong general tendency except in the direction of symbolism, which, in spite of Dante, can hardly be accounted a merit. Were I in love with paradox, I should say of the fourteenth century that it was not, as regards literature, a great age, but that it was an age of great men. In order to be great, an epoch must be solid, homogeneous; and the fourteenth century is a bundle of contradictions. But the greatness of individual writers — Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Froissart, Chaucer—is beyond the reach of cavil and controversy, being indeed all the more appreciable by reason of the mediocrity, or less, that serves them for a background.

INDEX.

Acerba, the, 234.
Adventures 0fArthur, CO.
Africa, the, 255, 256.
Aimeric de Pegulhan, 99.
Alfonso XI., 66.
Alfonso the Wise, 66.
Alisaunder, 43.
Alliterative verse, 48.
Ameto, the, 265.
Amis and Amiloun, 46.
Amorosa Visione, the, 265.
Amorozzo, 99.
Andrea da Barberino, 31.
Apuleius, 280.
Arnaut Daniel, 99, 107.
Araaut de Marueil, 160.
Arthour and Merlin, 43.
Asseneth, 18.

Augustijnken van Dordt, 83.
Avventuroso Ciciliano, 28.
Ayala, Pedro Lopez de, 350, 371.
Ayenbite of Invyyt, 390.
Azraki, 275.

Balade, 163.
Ballata, 106.
Barbour, John, 55.
Barcellos, Count of, 66.
Bards, 85.

Bartoli, Signor Adolfo, 132.
Bartsch, Herr Karl, 78.
Baudouin de Sebourc, 5.
Beecari, Antonio, 156.
Bel, Jean le, 339.
Benecke, Mr E. F. M., 136.

Benoit de Sainte-More, 267.
Bergerette, 165.
Bernat Deselot, 353, 354.
Bersil, Hugues de, 3.
Bertaechi, Signor, 214.
Bertran de Born, 149.
Bertrand du Guesclin, 15, 350.
Bianco da Siena, 94.
Black Prince, the, 16.
Blandin de Cornoalha, 24.
Boccaccio, 133, 156, 173, 210, 261-
284.

Boethius, 296, 298.
Boileau, 152.

Boke of the Duchesse, 288.

Bottari, 273.

Bovo d' Antona, 11.

Branche des Royaux Lignages, 92.

Breviari d'Amor, 367.

Bruce, the, 56.

Bruni, Leonardo, 174,175.

Bueve de Hanstone, 11.

Buonaccorso da Montemagno, 156.

Buonagiunta da Lucca, 109, 117.

Busone da Gubbio, 29.

Cancioneiro da Ayuda, 65.
Canterbury Tales, 310-319.
Cantico del Sole, 94.
Cantigas (Portuguese), 67.
Canzone, 100.
Carducci, Signor, 138, 276.
Carlyle, 172.
Casini, Signor, 281.
Castel d'Amor, 379.

Caalcll of Perseverance, 385.
Caterina da Siena, St, 398-400.
Cavalca, Fra Domenico, 395.
Cecco Angiolieri, 129.
Cecco d' Ascoli, 234.
Cene di la Chitarra, 129.
Centiloquio, 96, 97.
Cento NoveUe Antiche, 26.
Chansons de geste, 2.
Chansons, sottes, 93.
Chant royal, 162.
Chaucer, 285-324.
Chiaro Davanzati, 114, 120, 121.
Christine de Pisan, 169.
Cino Sinibuldi, 128.
Cinquante Ballades, the, 321.
Ciullo d'Aloamo, 94.
Combat des Trente, 14.
Commedia, 207-235, 262.
Gomplaynt of Mars and Venus, 300.
CompleynteoftheDetheofPiti, 290.
Conde Lucanor, El, 377, 378.
Confessio Amantis, the, 322.
Convivio, 191, 192.
Corbaccio, 271.
Cursor Mundi, 386.

Dan Michel, 391.

D'Ancona, Signer, 203.

Dante Alighieri, 107, 127-131, 172-

235, 291, 292, 299, 304.
Dante da Majano, 105.
Danza de la Muerte, 375.
Davydd ab Gwilym, 157-159.
De Contemptu Mundi (or Seeretum),

259.

De Monarchia, 201-205.
De Ocio Religiosorum, 257.
De Viris Illustrious, 257.
De Vita Solitaria, 258.
De Vulgari Eloquentia, 197.
Decameron, 272-283, 313.
Deguilleville, 291, 386.
Del Lungo, Signor, 327.
Del Reggimento e Costumi di Donne,
366.

Deschamps, Eustache, 165-167.
Dictys and Dares, 267.
Dinaux, M., 2.

Dine, Compagni, 184, 325-330.
Documenti a" Amore, 367.
Donati, Forese, 177, 180.
Dorfspoesie, 77.
Durante, Ser, 365.

Eckhart, Meister, 400.
Eclogues (Dante), 206.

(Petrarch), 253.
Emiliani-Giudici, 280, 281.
Enfances, 4.
EntrSe de Spagne, 8.
Epistle of Susanna, 55.
Epistles (Dante), 205.
Erweiterung (of Parzival), 32.
Essays of Elia, 140.
Estout, 9.
Ezekiel, 217.

Fabrizio dei Lambertazzi, 123.
FavoleUo, 115.
Fazio degli Uberti, 150, 234.
Fenini, Prof., 416.
Filippo, Fra, 398.
Filocopo, 264.
Filostrato, 266.
Fiore, II, 364.

Fioretti, the, of St Francis, 393.
Floire et BlancefUrr, 47, 264.
Folgore di San Gemignano, 129.
Folquet de Marseille, 99.
Fornsbgur, 36.

Francesco da Barberino, 110, 366.
Frauenlob, 73, 74.
Frederick II., 2, 108, 200.
Freidank, 2.

Friedrich von Schivaben, 33.
Frescobaldi, Dino, 124, 125.
Frescobaldi, Lionardo, 359.
Froissart, 168, 169, 336-350.
Fuetrer, Ulrich, 33, 34.

Gaspary, Herr, 132, 201, 221.

Gawayne and the Green, Knight, 50.

Gerson, Jean, 406-409.

Gesta Romanorum, 275.

Giordano, Fra, 394.

Giraut de Bornelh, 99.

Giraut Riquier, 61.

Gli Assempri, 398.

Godefroi de Paris, 93.

Goethe, 137.

Goigs, 69.

Gower, John, 320.

Gruffydd ab Adda, 158.

Guiart, Guillaume, 92.

Guido Cavalcanti, 127,128,141,180.

ii Ghislieri, 123.

„ Guinicelli, 120,121.

Ii Orlandi, 127.

« AnteriorContinuar »