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queue hanging over the capes of a blue surtout, who was in the act of mounting a powerful horse. The pedlar made two or three hasty steps forwards, and looked up in the rider's face, as he was adjusting himself on the saddle, and then returned, as if he had been mistaken in his man, and the horseman rode slowly away,

without noticing him.

I had already made up my mind to ask the old pedlar to sup with me; and as he heard me order a nice dish of Loch Ericht trouts to be fried, and a couple of fowls to be split open and broiled, he very readily accepted my invitation. Little was said during the meal, both of us being too much occupied to talk. After it was over, without speaking, I gently pushed the punchladle, and the whisky and materials, over to his side of the table, with a nod and a sign. He comprehended me at once, and,

yon canna be him, after a', for he maun be dead mony a day syne.”

A long draught of smoke, treasured up within my cheeks, and accompanied by a look of inquiry, told him I wished him to explain to whom he alluded.

Aye Sir, ye want to ken wha it was I saw at that time I'm speakin' o'. Troth it was nae less than the Laird o Lochandhu that was. Every body believed it to be him. And wha else could it be ? --for he was nae stranger, and kent a' the nooks and corners o’baith Badenoch and Strathspey. He gaed about a'where, an' mony a question he put about the auld fouk o' his ain day. But maist o' them ware dead.--He was seen to shed mony a tear. At length he rode awa' again, and naebody kent whare he gaed.”

“ And who was Lochandhu ?" said I,

yon canna be him, after a’, for he maun be dead mony a day syne.”

A long draught of smoke, treasured up within my cheeks, and accompanied by a look of inquiry, told him I wished him to explain to whom he alluded.

" Aye Sir, ye want to ken wha it was I saw at that time I'm speakin' o'. Troth it was nae less than the Laird o' Lochandhu that was. Every body believed it to be him. And wha else could it be? --for he was nae stranger, and kent a' the nooks and corners o' baith Badenoch and Strathspey. He gaed about a'where, an? mony a question he put about the auld fouk o' his ain day. But maist o' them ware dead. He was seen to shed mony a tear. At length he rode awa' again, and naebody kent whare he gaed.”

"And who was Lochandhu?" said I,

thought I had a gude bargain o't; and gif it had been in prent, I might may be hae sauld it again for a profit. But naebody can be fashed wi' vrite, ye ken; and sae I hae carried a' this weight for naething, ever sinsyne. I wuss I ware weel quite o't."

Without a word, I opened my purse, and laying a couple of sovereigns on the palm of my hand, I nodded significantly at the MS., and then looked in Johnny Fimister's face.- There I read surprise and joy.

“ Troth ye’s hae it wi' a' my heart, Sir," quoth Johnny; " my back 'll be glad to be free o't, an' I'll walk a' the lighter wi' thae yellow boys i' my pouch. Mony thanks t'ye, Sir--mony thanks; I wuss ye muckle gude o't.”

With all the eagerness of a book collector who has had the good fortune to pop upon some rare volume at a book-stall, I pounced upon my precious purchase, packed it up with attention, and sent it off next morning for Edinburgh by the Highland coach, addressed for myself, at Mrs Gladstanes', with a large Care, and to be kept dry,” on the back.

On my arrival in town the other day, I was pleased to find that my worthy landlady had taken particular care of it, and as I was employed in opening the parcel, the good woman remained in the room to tell me she had done so.

The strings took some time to undo, and her curiosity made her loiter about the apartment, under pretenceof dusting the chairs and tables with her apron, but always keeping her eyes thrown over her shoulder, as if eagerly watching for a sight of the contents. I was rejoiced to find all right. But mine hostess, on seeing nothing but a number of quires of dirty, closewritten, coarse sheets of foolscap, much

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