Journal of the Chemical Society, Volume 43

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Chemical Society., 1883
"Titles of chemical papers in British and foreign journals" included in Quarterly journal, v. 1-12.

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Página 396 - In fact these spectra present a considerable addition to the body of evidence in support of the view that elements whose atomic weights differ by an approximately constant quantity, and whose chemical character is similar, are truly horao'ogous bodies, or, in other words, are the same kind of matter in different states of condensation (Journal of the Chemical Society, September, 1883, p.
Página 208 - A fungus is developed on a single spot of ground — sheds its seed, and dies ; — on the spot where it grew it leaves a valuable manuring of phosphoric acid and alkalies — some magnesia and a little sulphate of lime. Another fungus might undoubtedly grow on the same spot again ; but upon the death of the first, the ground becomes occupied by a vigorous crop of grass rising like a phoenix on the ashes of its predecessor.
Página 245 - Principes do chimie has been used. The laboratory rooms open to students are as follows: (1) the general laboratory for introductory and qualitative work; (2) a special laboratory for general quantitative analysis; (3) a special laboratory for agricultural and medical quantitative analysis; (4) a blowpipe room: (5) an assay room; (6) a room for spectroscopic and other optical work in chemistry; (7) a room for weighing and for the analysis of gases; and (8) a reading room. The last named room is well...
Página 208 - The author's view of the formation of these rings is as follows :—A fungus is developed on a single spot of ground, sheds its seed and dies : on the spot where it grew it leaves a valuable manuring of phosphoric acid and alkalies, some magnesia, and a little sulphate of lime. Another fungus might undoubtedly grow on the same spot again ; but upon the death of the first the ground becomes occupied by a vigorous crop of grass, rising like a Phoenix on the ashes of its predecessors.
Página 238 - FELKIN, HM— Technical Education in a Saxon Town. Published for the City and Guilds of London Institute for the Advancement of Technical Education.
Página 479 - ... oxygen from the air, and forms a resinous mass. It unites readily with bromine, and is blackened by concentrated sulphuric acid in the cold. II. Examination of the water extract, the Gum. — Gum is a normal constituent of lacquer juice, and forms from 3 to 8 per cent of the original liquid. Since gum is insoluble in alcohol, it is conveniently separated by treating that portion of the original which was insoluble in alcohol with boiling water, filtering, and evaporating on a water-bath till...
Página 238 - November 2, 1848, states that there was established in 1841 "a Society known by the name of the Chemical Society, for the general advancement of Chemical Science, as intimately connected with the prosperity of the manufactures of the United Kingdom, many of which mainly depend on the application of chemical principles and discoveries for their beneficial development, and for a more extended and economical application of the industrial resources and sanatory condition of the community.
Página 210 - It is under opposite conditions, that is, where the soil is poor, that the •development of rings is generally observed. The growth of fungi being once established from some extraneous cause, such as above referred to, they will on decay supply a rich nitrogenous and mineral manuring to the adjacent herbage. A patch of dark-green luxuriant grass succeeds. This being cut or eaten off, the soil becomes the more exhausted the more luxuriant has been the growth. Accordingly the vegetation within the...
Página 140 - C'hem. Soc., March 1888.) T71VIGTOKITE. — This mineral, described as "fluoride of aluminium," -L' and obtained from the cryolite bed of Greenland ; it came with eudialyte, Arfvedsonite, columbite, black cryolite, Fergusonite, sapphirine, garnet, Allanite, &c., all from that locality. The whole mass consists of the same mineral, unaccompanied by any associated minerals ; it is made up of congeries of minute white transparent crystals, mostly broken up, and lying entangled amongst each other, which...
Página 211 - ... have these plants the power of assimilating nitrogen in some form from the atmosphere, or in some form or condition of distribution within the soil not available (at least when in competition) to the plants growing in association with them...

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