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Mr. Bates introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That the committee on Education be instructed to enquire into the expediency of providing by law, for the distribution of the interest arising from the state school fund annually among the several towns of the state, for the support of common schools. Which resolution was read and passed. Mr. Bottum introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That so much of His Excellency's message as relates to the New Jersey election, be referred to a select committee of three Senators.

Which resolution was read and passed.

The President appointed Mr. Bottum, Mr. Miner, and Mr. Eaton of Washington, as said committee.

Mr. Bates moved a reconsideration of the foregoing resolution of Mr. Bottum. Which motion was lost.

On motion of Mr. Short, The Senate adjourned.

AFTERNOON.

Mr. Butler introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Judiciary committee be instructed to enquire into the expediency of providing by law, for paying constables for returning votes for Senators and electors of President and Vice President, to their several county clerks, and report by bill or otherwise. Which resolution was read and passed. Mr. Dana introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That so much of His Excellency's message as relates to the state prison, be referred to the committee on Finance; so much as relates to the subject of banks, to the committee on Banks; so much as relates to schools and the application of the school fund, to the committee on Education; so much as relates the remission of fines imposed by the county courts, and so much as relates to the delivery of offenders to the executive of other states, to the Judiciary committee. Which resolution was read and passed.

On motion of Mr. Adams, The committee on Finance were discharged from the consideration of the petition of John M. Potter,

And the said petition was referred to the committee on Claims.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr, Merrill, their clerk: Mr. President: The House of Representatives concur with the Senate in passing a resolution for a joint assembly, for the election of a reporter of the decisions of the supreme court.

The House of Representatives also concur with the Senate in their amendment of the resolution for a joint assembly for the election of commissioners of the deaf and dumb, and of a superintendant of the state prison; also, in the amendment of the Senate of the resolution for a joint assembly for the election of judges of the supreme court.

On motion of Mr. Eaton of Franklin, The Senate adjourned.

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 1840. Mr. Miner, from the committee on Rules, reported the following JOINT RULES OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESEN

TATIVES. 1. A joint assembly shall be formed by a union of the Senate and House of Representatives, in the hall of the latter, for the purpose of electing certain State and County Officers, in which the Secretary of State, or in his absence the Secretary of the Senate, shall officiate as Clerk. It shall be formed only at such time, and for such specific purpose, as may be expressed in a concurrent resolution of both Houses; and may adjourn from time to time during the sitting of the General Assembly.

2. The proceedings of every joint assembly, including the resolutions ordering the same, shall be recorded in a book kept for that purpose, which shall be preserved in the office of the Secretary of State, a copy of which shall be furnished to the Governor by the Secretary of State, but shall not be reported to the Senate or House of Representatives, or published with their journals, unless especially so ordered.

3. Previous to the meeting of any joint assembly, for the purpose of electing county officers, the members of the Senate and House of Representatives, from the several counties, shall convene in county conventions, and make a nomination, for all the officers to be elected in their respective counties, and present the same for the consideration of the joint assembly; and no nomination of any county officers shall be finally acted on by the joint assembly, until the same shall have been submitted to the county convention.

4. The rules of the Senate, so far as applicable, shall be observed in regulating the proceedings of every joint assembly.

5. The committees of the Senate and House of Representatives, to whom the same subject matters shall have been referred, may, for the purpose of facilitating business, meet together as a joint committee, and make à joint or separate report to either or both Houses, as they may think expedient.

6. In every case of a disagreement between the Senate and House of Representatives, if either shall request a conference, and appoint a committee for that purpose, and the other house shall also appoint a committee on its part, such committees shall meet, at a convenient hour, to be agreed upon by their chairmen, in the conference room, and state to each other, verbally or in writing, the reasons of each house for its vote on the subject matter of disagreement, confer freely thereon, and make report of their doings to their respective houses, as soon as may be.

7. Committees of conference shall consist of an equal number from each house, and shall return the papers referred to them to that house which last voted upon the subject matter of disagreement.

8. When bills are on their passage between the two houses, they shall be under the signature of the Secretary or Clerk of each house respectively.

9. After bills have passed both houses, and a certificate showing the one in which they respectively originated has been duly endorsed thereon, they shall be delivered to a joint standing committee of two Senators and two members of the House of Representatives, to be designated the Committee on Bills, who shall make careful examination, and see that they are correctly engrossed, and when satisfied of their accuracy, shall present them, first to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and then to the President of the Senate, for their official signatures, and having obtained them, they shall forthwith deliver them to the Governor for his approbation, and shall make true report to both houses of the day on which each bill was so delivered to the Governor, which shall be duly entered upon the journal of each house. "

10. When a bill or resolution, which shall have passed one house, is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be given to the house in which the same shall have passed; and all such rejected bills or resolutions, with the accompanying papers, shall be returned to, and left in custody of, the house which first acted upon them.

11. Each house shall transmit to the other all papers on which any bill or resolution shall be founded ; and should such bills or resolutions pass both houses, the same papers shall be delivered to the Governor.

12. After each house shall have adhered to the vote of disagreement, a bill or resolution shall be lost.

13. No bill, which shall have passed one house, shall be sent for concurrence to the other, on either of the two list days of the session. .

Which were adopted.

(S. 5.) Mr. Clark introduced a bill entitled "an act in addition to, and in alteration of, an act entitled "an act regulating and governing the militia of this state ;.”

Which was read the first and second times, and referred to the committee on Military Affairs.

Mr. Dean introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That the committee on Roads and Canals be instructed to inquire into the expediency of so amending the laws of this state, relating to the indictment of any town for bad roads or bridges, that it shall be necessary to give information to the selectmen of the town, of the state of the roads or bridges, and that a reasonable time may be allowed for making repairs, before such town shall be liable to costs and prosecution for the same

Which resolution was read and passed. (S. 6.) Mr. Norton introduced a bill entitled “ of the General List;"

Which was read the first and second times and referred to the committee on Finance.

(S. 7.) Mr. Butler introduced a bill entitled "an act relating to the punishment of capital crimes ;"

Which was read the first and second time, and referred to the committee on the Judiciary.

On motion, the committee on the Judiciary were discharged from the consideration of the bill introduced by Mr. Butler, entitled "an act relating to the punishment of capital crimes,”

And the same was referred to a select committee of three Senators.

The President appointed Mr. Butler, Mr. Waterman and Mr. Bates, as such committee.

The following communication was received from His Excellency, the Governor:

To the Senate : I herewith transmit copies of the report of the Bank Commissioners, and of the Auditor's abstract of accounts, allowed against the State ; and have the honor to inform the Senate, that I have, this day, communicated to the House of Representatives, for the use of the General Assembly, the original reports of the Auditor in the Treasury Department; also, his report of the condition of the State School Fund; the report of the Quarter-Master-General ; of the Adjutant and Inspector-General; of the Superintendant of the State Prison; of the committee appointed to contract for the labor of the convicts in the State Prison; of the Commissioners of the Deaf, and Dumb, and Blind ; of the Trustees of the Vermont Asylum for the Insane, and the report of the committee on the Revised Statutes.

I also communicate to the Senate, for the use of the General Assembly, the several resolutions from our neighboring states, referred to in niy annual message of the tenth instant, together with sundry other documents that have been received, with a request that the same might be laid before the General Assembly.

. S. H. JENISON. Executive Chamber,

Oct. 13th, 1840. S The documents accompanying the foregoing communications were severally referred as follows:

The report of the bank commissioners to the committee on Banks: and the abstract of the auditor of accounts against the state, to the committee on Finance:

The resolutions from the General Assembly of the state of Maine, and of the state of Indiana, relative to the North Eastern Boundary question, to Mr. Miner, Mr. Short, and Mr. Wooster:

The resolutions from the General Assembly of the states of New York, Connecticut and Kentucky, relative to the public lands, to a select committee consisting of Mr. Dana, Mr. Harvey and Mr. Wheelock:

The resolutions from the General Assembly of the state of North Car

olina, the remonstrance from the citizens of the District of Columbia, and the resolutions and address from the citizens of Georgetown, D. C. relating to the General Government, referred to Mr. Clark, Mr. Wheelock and Mr. Butler. Mr. Adams introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That so much of the Governor's message of the 10th instant, as relates to the action of the House of Representatives of the United States, at their last session, whereby five of the returned members of that House, from the state of New Jersey, were unjustly deprived of their seats; with the resolutions of the legislature of the state of New Jersey, this day communicated to the Senate, by His Excellency the Governor, be referred to the committee heretofore appointed, on the resolution of the Senator from Addison, touching the case of the New Jersey. election. Which resolution was read and passed. The Senate adjourned.

AFTERNOON.

Mr. Wooster introduced the following resolution :

Resolved, That the Judiciary committee be instructed to enquire into the expediency of passing a law to prevent vagrancy in the state of Vermont.

Which was read and passed.

(S. 8.) Mr. Wooster, from the committee appointed on the petition of Zaccheus Bass and others, reported a bill entitled “an act to preserve fish in Otter Creek;" Which was read the first and second times, and

On motion of Mr. Eaton of Franklin, Ordered, That said bill be laid on the table.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Washburn, the assistant clerk:

MR. PRESIDENT: The House have passed a bill entitled “ an act in addition to an act, entitled an act to incorporate the Goshen Turnpike Company,”' in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate.

Mr. Butler introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That the committee on Elections be instructed to inquire whether any member of the Senate is now holding an office of profit or trust, under the authority of Congress.

Which resolution was read and passed. (S. 9.) Mr. Morse introduced a bill entitled “ an act to prevent damage

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