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Taxes for School purposes, .

401

Duties of County Clerk,. .

402

Libraries,..

403

Distribution of income of School Fund,..

405

Suits and Judgments against School Districts,.

405

Penalties and Liabilities, . .

406

Miscellaneous Provisions, .

407

General Notes,...

409

Decision of Supreme Court as to dissolution of Districts, .

409

Multiplication of Districts,

410

Qualification of Teachers,.

411

Discipline and conduct of the Schools,.

412

Text Books,......

413, 447

Change of Site of School House,.

413

Reconsideration of Proceedings,.

414

Taxes,

414

Contracts with Teachers,.

414

Boarding Teachers,. .

415

Exemption of Indigent Persons, .

415

Dismissal of Scholars,

416

Libraries,

416

Suits,

420

Decisions,......

• 420, 421

Extracts from the Reports of successive Superintendent's of Public Instruction of Mich-

igan, .....

421

Importance of the Public Schools,

Improvement of the Schools,.

428

Character of Inspectors,...

428

Course of Studies proper to be pursued in the Schools,.

430

School Libraries,....

Uniformity of Books,

449

Examination of Teachers,

Blackboark Instruction,...

453

The necessity of good teaching,.

454

Small Districts,...

455

Consolidation of Districts,

457

Physical Exercise, ...

457

The Teacher's Calling, .

457

Union Schools,..

458

Location and Ventilation of School Houses, .

460

Construction of School Houses..

462

Appurtenances, . ....

467

Education of Teachers,

467

Regulations from other states as to the qualifications of Teachers of Primary Schools,. . 468

Moral qualifcations,.

468

Literary

do

469

Capacity to Govern,.

470

Examining Teachers,..

472

Rate Bill and Warrant,

475

Decision of Supreme Court,,

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Laws relating to Public Instruction and Incorporated Institutions of Learning in Michi-

gan, .....

481

An act prescribing the duties of Superintendent of Publio Instruction,.

481

Act to provide for the Government of the University,..

483

Act relating to State Library, -. ...

485

Act to establish a State Normal Schoo!,.

485

Acts to consolidate and amend Normal School act,.

. 487, 491

Laws relating to Free Schools of the city of Detroit, .

491

Laws relating to the city of Ann Arbor,-

496

Monroe,..

Grand Rapids,

407

Incorporated Literary Institutions,. ,

497

Act requiring Returns to be made,..

497

Act to incorporate the Marshall academy,..

497

Michigan Central Collage,.

499

* amend the same,.....

.500, 501

“ incorporate the trustees of Spring Arbor Seminary,..

501

Acts to amend the same,......

.502, 503, 504, 505

Act to incorporate the Michigan and Huron Institute,.

505

Tecumseh Academy,.

507

Trustees of Grand River Theological Seminary, .

508

Grass Lake Academy,..

509

Marshall College,

510

Marshall Female Seminary,

512

St. Philip's College, .

513

Allegan Acadeiny,..

514

Grand Rapids Academy,.

515

Utica Female Seminary,.

516

Ann Arbor Female Seminary,.

517

Ypsilanti Seminary,.

Adrian Seminary,

519

Clinton Institute,

Owasso Literary Institute,..

522

Vermontville Academical Association,

523

White Pigeon Academy,

Raisin Institute,

526

Howell Academy,. .

527

Leoni Theological Institute,

528

Leoni Seminary,...

529

Olivet Institute,

530

Woodstock Manual Labor Institute,

630

Oakland Female Seminary,.

531

Tecumseh Literary Institute, ..

532

Clarkston Academical Institute,

533

Clinton Institute,• ...

534

Young Ladies' Seminary of Monroe, .

St. Mark's College, .

537

St. Mary's Academy,

539

Literary Associations,..

539

Aot to incorporate the Young Men's Society of Detroity.

...... 530

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Act to incorporate the Union Hall Association of Monroe, ......

Adrian Lyceum and Benevolent Association, .
Almont Young Men's Society,...
Lawrence Literary Institute Association,

Niles Union Hall Association,
International exchange,.
Joint Resolution relative to Mons. Vattemare's system of Exchange,
Education of the Deaf and Dumb, &c.,.
Act to establish an Asylum,
Act to amend the same, .
Acts relating to School and other Lands,.
State Land Office,..
Superintendence and Disposition of the Lands,.
Salt Spring Lands,
Miscellaneous Provisions,
Amendatory acts,..
Act requiring Report to Regents, .
Act for establishment of Land Office at Capitol,..

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APPENDIX.

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Communications embracing accounts of Union Schools, &c., .
Wesleyan Seminary,.
Olivet Institute,
St. Mark's College,..
Young Ladies' Seminary at Marshall,
Fayette Union School,
Battle Creek Union School,
Ypsilanti Union School,
Lansing Union School,.
Detroit Ladies' Academy,
Gregory's Commercial College,
Meteorology,
Rules for the Government of Township Libraries,
Rules for Government of Medical College,.
Text Books,
Library Books,
Statement of Expenditures of Regents of University from 1837 to Dec. 1851,
Comparative statement of sales of University and School Lands,.
Abstract of Inspectors' Returns,..
Recapitulation of “
Apportionment of School Moneys,.

573 575 577 579

579

581

592

587 507

596

599

600

632

634

STATE OF MICHIGAN.

Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

To His EXCELLENCY, ROBERT MCCLELLAND,

Governor:

SIR-When the illustrious Chief and Exile from Europe, whose eloquence and philosophy and patriotism have so recently astonished the world, planted his footsteps for the first time upon the shores of the United States, impressed with a sense of its commercial greatness, as exhibited in the grent metropolis of our country, his lofty genius, looking beyond the triumphs of the physical world, ascribed the glory of America to its educational institutions, and the provisions made in the early days of the Republic, for the support and spread of Primary School education. Looking back, not yet a century, American institutions existed not even in name. The struggles of the Revolution established them as a fact; and it is a circumstance well worthy of remembrance, that our educational system is closely allied to the trials of the revolutionary war, and its means of education, for the support of schools, derived from the consequences of that war—the immense public debt which it created. It is an interesting fact in the history of our country, illustrating the sagacity and foresight of our fathers, that as a means of extinguishing that debt, and as one, the most reliable and sure of all others that could be devised, the one thirty-sixth part of the public domain was set apart forever, as a fund for the advancement of education-thus presenting an inducement to the purchase of the lands, and to the settlement of the country, which has effected its purpose, and scattered over the length and breadth of our land, a race of hardy men who have subdued our forests, cultivated our fields, and laid the basis of physical, social, intellectual and moral prosperity and wealth. It is most gratifying, but not wonderful that such a race should be deeply impressed with the idea, that to perpetuate the blessings of liberty and good government, schools, and the means of education should forever be encouraged. New England has long boasted of her system of schools, and means of education; and it has not been vain boasting. From the land of the Rock of Plymouth, from its statesmen, its orators, its poets, and its people, a powerful influence has been sent out in behalf of education. There the principle of schools, free and open to all-the doctrine of universal education--received its first impulse. The glory of New England in her schools is the achievement of more than a century. Her system had its origin among the causes of the revolution-ours is one of its consequences. The success of both-the triumph of education everywhere in our land-the means afforded for its support-educational institutions provided throughout the several States of the Union-constitute the common glory of the Republic, as they afford the only safeguard for its progress and perpetuity. “Each State," says a distinguished living statesman, “is deeply interested in the welfare of every other, for

the representatives of the whole regulate, by their votes, the measures of the Union, which must be happy and prosperous in proportion as its councils are gnided by more enlightened views, resulting from the more universal diffusion of Light and Knowledge and Education."

The educational history of our country, has not yet been developed in the manner it should be. One of the principal causes which has prevented it from being done, has been the fact that in most of the States of the Union there has been no separate officer charged with the special supervision of Public Instruction. Information could not be concentrated, nor reduced to system. So long as the interests of education are mado socondary in importance, in the scale of public offices, so long will its legitimate benefits be greatly retarded. Every State needs a separate officer of Public Instruction, charged with its general supervision, whose special duty it should be to accumulate all the material which is legitimately embraced in a system of Public Instruction, to present it in embodied form before the representatives of the people, and thus secure from time to time, that just share of attention to which the subject is entitled at the hands of those who are placed in authority to frame our laws and to mould and form our local governments.

The State of Michigan was the first in the Union that established a constitutional officer by the name and designation of “Superintendent of Public Instruction.” The system contemplated by the framers of the first constitution and laws, embraced the widest field. It con. sisted of a head of the department, designated as above with general supervision; a University, in which education was free, governed by a Board of Regents, now elected by the people, with a local Faculty; branches of the University, and a system of Primary Schools, under the management of Township officers, designated Inspectors of Primary Schools, and district officers, known as Moderator, Director and Assessor of the school district. It did not contemplate the creation of other incorporated literary institutions; but as their establishment is based upon influences which must always continue to exist, and be more or less powerful, charters were subsequently granted to these institutions. Having received such charters, they are legitimately embraced in the system of Public Instruction, and in most instances, as they should be in all, made subject to the visitation of the Superintendent, and required to make to him an annual report. The institutions and officers as above enumerated, have constituted the educational working force of Michigan for the first fifteen years of its existence. To these has been added by the Legislature of 1850, a State Normal School, the exclusive purposes of which are defined in the organic law, to be “the instruction of all persons, both male and female, in the art of teaching, and in all the various branches that pertain to a good common school education; also to give instruction in the arts of husbandry and agricultural chemistry in the fundamental laws of the United States, and in what regards the rights and duties of citizens." This school is under the government of a Board of Education, consisting of three members, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction, who are elected by the people. The requisite inain building has been erected, at an expense of over twenty thousand dollars, thirteen thousand of which was subscribed and paid by the citizens of Ypsilanti, where the school is located. This institution will be put into operation in the course of the coming fall or spring, when the principal and requisite teachers will be employed, and its course of studies announced.

By an act of the Legislature approved June 23d, 1851, all State officers from whom reports are required to be made to the Legislature, are to report for the year 1851 to the Governor of the State. Under an act prescribing the duties of Superintendent of Public Instruction, it is provided that he shal annually prepare and transmit to the Governor a report containing:

1. A statement of the coudition of the University and its branches; of all incorporated lite rary institutions and of the primary schools.

2. Estimates and amounts of expenditures of the school money.

3. Plans for the improvement and management of all educational funds, and for the better organization of the educational system, if in his opinion the same be required.

4. The condition of the Normal Sehool.

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