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But to see her was to love her ;
Love but her, and love for ever.
Had we never loved sae kindly,
Had we never lov'd sae blindly,
Never met or never parted,
We had ne'er been broken hearted.
Fare thee weel, thou first and fairest !
Fare thee weel, thou best and dearest!
Thine be ilka joy and treasure,
Peace, enjoyment, love and pleasure !
Ae fond kiss, and then we sever;
Ae fareweel, alas! for ever!
Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee !

AMANG THE TREES. TUNEThe King of France, he rade a Race. AMANG the trees where humming bees

At buds and flowers were hinging, 0, Auld Caledon drew out her drone,

And to her pipe was singing, 0); 'Twas pibroch, sang, strathspey, or reels,

She dirl'd them off fu' clearly, 0, When there cam a yell o’ foreign squeels,

That dang her tapsalteerie, 0. Their capon craws and queer ha ha's,

They made our lugs grow eerie, O! The hungry bike did scrape and pike Till we were wae and weary, 0.

But a royal ghaist wha once was cas'd,

A prisoner aughteen year awa, He fir'd a fiddler in the North

That dang them tapsalteerie, 0.

ANNA, THY CHARMS.

TUNE-Bonnie Mary.
ANNA, thy charms my bosom fire,

And waste my soul with care ;
But, ah ! how bootless to admire,

When fated to despair !
Yet in thy presence, lovely fair,

To hope may be forgiven ;
For sure 'twere impious to despair,

So much in sight of Heav'n.

A ROSE-BUD BY MY EARLY WALK.

TUNE-The Rose-bud.

A ROSE-BUD by my early walk,
Adown a corn-enclosed bawk,
Sae gently bent its thorny stalk,

All on a dewy morning.
Ere twice the shades o' dawn are fled,
In a' its crimson glory spread,
And drooping rich the dewy head,

It sceuts the early morning.

Within the bush, her covert nest,
A little linnet fondly prest,
The dew sat chilly on her breast

Sae early in the morning.
She soon shall see her tender brood,
The pride, the pleasure o' the wood,
Amang the fresh green leaves bedew'd,

Awake the early morning.
So thou, dear bird, young Jeany fair!
On trembling string or vocal air,
Shall sweetly pay the tender care

That tends thy early morning.
So thou, sweet rose-bud, young and gay,
Shalt beauteous blaze upon the day,
And bless the parent's evening ray

That watch'd thy early morning.

AS I WAS A WAND'RING.

TUNE-Rinn Meudial mo Mhealladh.

As I was a-wand'ring ae midsummer e’enin',

The pipers and youngsters were making

their game

Amang them I spied my faithless fause lover, Which bled a' the wounds o' my dolour

again. Weel, since he has left me, my pleasure

gae wi' him ;
I
may

be distress'd, but I winna complain ;

I Aatter my fancy I may get anither,

My heart it shall never be broken for

ane.

I couldna get sleeping till dawin for greetin', The tears trickled down like the hail and

the rain : Had I na got greetin', my heart wad a broken,

For oh! love forsaken's a tormenting pain. Although he has left me for greed o’the siller,

I dinna envy him the gains he can win ; I rather wad bear a' the lade o' my sorrow

Than ever hae acted sae faithless to him.

AS I WAS A-WAND'RING AE

MORNING IN SPRING. As I was a wand'ring ae morning in spring, I heard a young ploughman sae sweetly to

sing ; And as he was singing thir words, he did say, There's nae life like the ploughman's in the

month of sweet May. The lav'rock in the morning she'll rise frae

her nest, And mount to the air wi' the dew on her

breast, And wi' the merry ploughman she'll whistle

and sing, And at night she'll return to her nest back

again.

AULD LANG SYNE. Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And never brought to mind? Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And days o' lang syne ?

CHORUS

For auld lang syne, my dear,

For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,

For auld lang syne.
We twa hae run about the braes,

And pu’d the gowans fine ;
But we've wandered mony a weary foot,

Sin auld lang syne.
We twa hae paidl’t i' the burn,

Frae mornin' sun till dine ;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd,

Sin auld lang syne.
And here's a hand, my trusty fiere,

And gie's a hand o’ thine;
And we'll tak a right guid willie-waught,

For auld lang syne.
And surely ye'll be your pint-stoup

And surely I'll be mine;
And we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,

For auld lang syne.

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