Putting History to the Question: Power, Politics, and Society in English Renaissance Drama

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Columbia University Press, 02/05/2000 - 464 páginas

-- Garrett A. Sullivan, Shakespeare Quarterly

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Índice

Introduction
1
Shakespeare and the Bonds
13
Social Change and the Language
49
The Social Vision of A New Way to
73
Charity and the Social Order
99
Imagining the Bastard in English
127
Bastardy Counterfeiting and Misogyny in The Revengers
149
Playing with Hands on
167
Othello and Early
269
An Episode of Torture at Bantam
285
Romance Empire and Mercantile Fantasy
311
Nation Language and the Optic
339
Shakespeare
373
Shakespeare and the Tropes
399
Notes
419
Index
509

RACE NATION EMPIRE
205
Race Adultery and the Hideous in Othello
237

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Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 100 - My lord delayeth his coming ; and shall begin to beat the menservants and maidens, and to eat and drink, and to be drunken ; the lord of that servant will come in a day when he looketh not for him, and at an hour when he is not aware, and will cut him in sunder, and will appoint him his portion with the unbelievers. And there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.
Página 76 - The bourgeoisie, wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his "natural superiors," and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous "cash payment.
Página 147 - Should lift their bosoms higher than the shores And make a sop of all this solid globe: Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead: Force should be right; or rather, right and wrong, Between whose endless jar justice resides, Should lose their names, and so should justice too.
Página 227 - I had a friend that loved her, I should but teach him how to tell my story And that would woo her.
Página 229 - But there, where I have garner'd up my heart, Where either I must live, or bear no life ; The fountain from the which my current runs, Or else dries up...
Página 198 - Here's the smell of the blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.
Página 202 - I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness; so we'll live, // And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news; and we'll talk with them too, Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out; And take...
Página 218 - Even now, now, very now, an old black ram Is tupping your white ewe. Arise, arise ; Awake the snorting citizens with the bell, Or else the devil will make a grandsire of you : Arise, I say.
Página 227 - Of hair-breadth scapes i' the imminent deadly breach, Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery, of my redemption thence, And portance in my travel's history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Página 233 - O, that the slave had forty thousand lives ! One is too poor, too weak for my revenge. Now do I see 'tis true. Look here, lago ; All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven : 'Tis gone. Arise, black vengeance, from thy hollow cell ! Yield up, O love, thy crown and hearted throne To tyrannous hate ! Swell, bosom, with thy fraught, For 'tis of aspics

Acerca do autor (2000)

Michael Neill is professor of English at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. He is the author of Issues of Death: Mortality and Identity in English Renaissance Tragedy and editor of the Oxford Shakespeare edition of Antony and Cleopatra.


Informação bibliográfica