The History of Modern Europe: With an Account of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: and a View of the Progress of Society, from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris, in 1763, Volume 1

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William Young Birch and Abraham Small, 1802

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Índice

Page
313
Make themselves masters of Nice and Antioch and break
316
Frederic Barbarossa crosses the Helespont with a great
319
Conquers Poland and erects it into a tributary kingdom
323
The king of France returns to Europe in disgust
325
Richard mortally wounded by an arrow ibid
332
The English barons have recourse to arms and extort from
340
Attempts to render the imperial crown hereditary in
346
New crusade under Baldwin count of Flanders ibid
348
The Pope absolves king John from the oath which he
363
Lewis obliged to evacuate the kingdom ibid
367
The king restored
376
His brother establishes himself on the throne of Sicily
384
His regal dignity confirmed by the see of Rome ibid
390
Edward revives a claim of feudal superiority over that
405
Obtains large supplies from his parliament and confirms
411
The English forces driven out of Scotland
418
The Romans finally evacuate Britain ibid
419
The Scots ravage the northern counties of England
425
Edward concludes a truce with Scotland ibid
428
Establishes the grandeur of his family in Austria ibid
435
He resolves to establish the Imperial authority in Italy
441
Fails in that enterprize and dies at Perpignan
447
Philip IV succeeded by his son Lewis X
454
Philip 111 at the instigation of the Pope undertakes
456
The English gain an important advantage over the French
465
Calais taken by Edward
471
John unable to fulfil the articles of the treaty honourably
479
Restored by an English army under the Black Prince
482
Lewis lands near the city of Damietta in Egypt at
484
Clovis king of the Franks son of Childeric and grandson
486
The Pope declares his election void ibid
488
The Emperor Charles IV having settled the affairs
494

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Página 291 - He summoned an assembly of all the prelates of England; and he put to them this concise and decisive question, Whether or not they were willing to submit to the ancient laws and customs of the kingdom ? The bishops unanimously replied, that they were willing, saving their own order...
Página 109 - THE merit of this prince, both in private and public life, may, with advantage, be set in opposition to that of any monarch or citizen, which the annals of any age or any nation can present to us. He seems, indeed, to be the complete model of that perfect character, which, under the denomination...
Página 264 - This change happening precisely at the juncture when the panic terror, which I have mentioned, rendered pilgrimages most frequent, filled Europe with alarm and indignation. Every person who returned from Palestine related the dangers which he had encountered in visiting the holy city, and described with exaggeration the cruelty and vexations of the Turks.
Página 242 - ... was a general survey of all the lands in the kingdom, their extent in each district, their proprietors, tenures, value; the quantity of meadow, pasture, wood, and arable land, which they contained; and in some counties the number of tenants, cottagers, and slaves of all denominations, who lived upon them.
Página 298 - Some menacing expressions which they had dropped gave a suspicion of their design ; and the king dispatched a messenger after them, charging them to attempt nothing against the person of the primate ; but these orders arrived too late to prevent their fatal purpose. The four assassins, though they took different roads to England, arrived nearly about the same time at Saltwood, near Canterbury; and, being there joined by some assistants, they proceeded in great haste to the archiepiscopal palace.
Página 333 - ... the images, the statues of the saints were laid on the ground ; and, as if the air itself were profaned, and might pollute them by its contact, the priests carefully covered them up, even from their own approach and veneration. The use of bells entirely ceased in all the churches : the bells themselves were removed from the steeples, and laid on the ground with the other sacred utensils.
Página 266 - These men took the road towards Constantinople, through Hungary and Bulgaria ; and trusting that Heaven, by supernatural assistance, would supply all their necessities, they made no provision 'for subsistence on their march.
Página 334 - ... and as if the air itself were profaned, and might pollute them by its contact, the priests carefully covered them up, even from their own approach and veneration. The use of bells entirely ceased in all the churches, the bells themselves were removed from the steeples and laid on the ground with the other sacred utensils. Mass was celebrated with shut doors, and none but the priests were admitted to that holy institution.
Página 407 - For this reason he issued writs to the sheriffs, enjoining them to send to parliament, along with two knights of the shire, two deputies from each borough within their county...

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