Time to Begin Anew: Dryden's Georgics and Aeneis

Capa
Bucknell University Press, 2000 - 263 páginas
Time to Begin Anew places Dryden's translations of Virgil's Georgics and Aeneis firmly in the context of late seventeenth-century literary and political dilemmas and transitions. Arguing that these translations are important documents in a watershed period of English literature, this study demonstrates that they are not hackwork or party pieces. This book also demonstrates both the continuities with and departures from Dryden's own early works, particularly his Virgilian poems, showing both the wholeness of his literary career and its diversity.
 

Opinião das pessoas - Escrever uma crítica

Não foram encontradas quaisquer críticas nos locais habituais.

Índice

On Equal Terms with Ancient Wit Engaging
27
Satire will have room whereer I write
38
Studying Natures Laws
55
Heavn will exercise us to the last
68
Safe in ourselves while on ourselves we stand
77
Towards a Carmen Perpetuum
89
Monuments of Woes
105
Thy Wars Brought Nothing About
129
Jove was alike to Latian and Phrygian
167
Thy Lovers Were All Untrue
179
Now let us go where Phoebus leads the way
200
Time To Begin Anew
221
Notes
223
Bibliography
248
Index
260
Direitos de autor

Blood
149

Outras edições - Ver tudo

Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 34 - Fragments of a vessel which are to be glued together must match one another in the smallest details, although they need not be like one another. In the same way a translation, instead of resembling the meaning of the original, must lovingly and in detail incorporate the original's mode of signification, thus making both the original and the translation recognizable as fragments of a greater language, just as fragments are part of a vessel.
Página 33 - Tis sufficient to say, according to the proverb, that here is God's plenty. We have our forefathers and great grand-dames all before us, as they were in Chaucer's days: their general characters are still remaining in mankind, and even in England, though they are called by other names than those of Monks, and Friars, and Canons, and Lady Abbesses, and Nuns; 'for mankind is ever the same, and nothing lost out of nature, though everything is altered.

Acerca do autor (2000)

Tanya Caldwell is an assistant professor of English at Georgia State University.

Informação bibliográfica