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FAREWELL

TO

THE OUTWARD BOUND.

ADDRESSED TO MEMBERS

OF

THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

BY

ONE OF HER MINISTERS.

SECOND EDITION, ENLARGED.

LONDON:
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS,

PATERNOSTER-ROW.

1850.

WHAT ARE THE TRUE PRINCIPLES ON WHICH COLONIZATION

OUGHT TO BE CONDUCTED?

“ What immense empires have sprung out of the womb of England; and how indifferent are we still as to what may result from the enormous tide of emigration that is annually pouring out of our land! Hitherto we have confused emigration with colonization ; -of the latter we have thought nothing, and of the former but little, only so far as it may affect ourselves ; and, alas! the manner in which our countrymen have been allowed to leave their native land, reflects disgrace on us, and is attended with the most sad and baneful results, by imbuing the minds of our colonists with a spirit of disgust aud disaffection towards the mother country. We trouble ourselves but little about emigration, other than as a relief to our own country ; and persons who are considered as too bad for us, are frequently thought good enough for the colonies. We have been anxious to promote the emigration of the idle and profligate, and to prevent that of the moral and industrious. Surely this reflects no honour on us, and cannot but be attended with the worst results to our colonial possessions. Instead of this, the choicest sample should be selected as the seed for a virgin soil; and such ought to be our mode of conducting coloniz. ation. The essence of our present height of civilization ought to be conveyed to those countries which, ere long, are to teem with human life. It has taken our country many generations to rise to that refined tone of education and improvement which she has now reached. Let our colonies, therefore, enjoy the benefit of our experience and advancement, which has cost us so much, and instead of retro grading, as it is to be feared too many have done, in the scale of civilization, let them rather be seasoned with as much of our good as we can give them, and with as little of our vices as possible.

“Let the best order of things be first established, wherever we plant a colony, and we shall find, as people immigrate into the colony, and settle around this nucleus of civilization, they will most readily conform to the existing laws and customs. But if, on the other hand, we allow persons to flood a colony without any model of civilized life around which they may congregate, and after which they can mould their practices, the necessary tendency must be dispersion and lawlessness; and any attempt to collect and modify such scattered and isolated beings must be attended with the greatest difficulties. The bees will never swarm without their queen, and if they lose her, never properly settle in the hive. And other lessons from nature teach us on what principles colonization ought to be conducted ; let us learn a lesson from them, and take shame to ourselves that they so far outstrip us in wisdom." – From a letter by the Rev. I. C. Childs, incumbent of St. Mary's Devonport, who spiritually superintends the departure of emigrants from that port.

* Any profits from the sale of this Edition will be given towards a fund for

erecting a church in this district.

LONDON:
SPOTTISWOODĖs and SHAW

New-street-Square.

FAREWELL

TO

THE OUTWARD-BOUND.

My dear Fellow-Countrymen, SHOULD each coming year bear any relation to the past, as to the number of those who leave their native land, I am indeed attempting to address a vast multitude - varied in the motives which may lead them to seek a foreign shore. Whether driven by loss and misfortune, or enticed by the love of change, or encouraged by the prospect of immediate and rich advantage, still one common lot describes

you all. You are about to say “farewell” to friends and country — many

of
you
for ever.

One common link, which has hitherto held you all, must soon be broken. And, now that home and native land are fading from your view, I feel it is a time when your hearts will answer to an assurance of sympathy from those you leave behind; and when words of warning and entreaty, from one who commends you in earnest prayer to the protection of your Almighty Father, may claim a serious and willing attention.

You have taken a most important step in life. You are parting from old connections, and entering on a new and adventurous course. The world is henceforth before you: new scenes, new customs, and new associates.

Now, then, let past experience influence your future

B

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