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OF THE

FORMATION OF THE CONSTITUTION

OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

BY

GEORGE BANCROFT.

IN TWO VOLUMES

VOL. II.

FIFTH EDITION,

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,

1, 8, AND 5 BOND STREET.

COPYRIGHT BY

GEORGE BANCROFT,

1882.

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Events overruled by justice, 3 — General desire for a closer union, 3 -

Character of the elections to the federal convention, 3 - Journey to Philadel-

phia, 4 - Arrival of Washington, 4-Opening of the federal convention, 4

- The Virginia members prepare a finished plan, 5 - Washington declares for

a new constitution, 5-Position of Edmund Randolph, 8 - His station and

character, 6 - Virginia unites under the lead of Madison, 7- Shall the con-

vention vote by states, 7 — Arrival of delegates, 7 – Their jarring opinions, 8

- Washington's appeal to them, 8— The convention organized, 8— Limited

power of the delegates from Delaware, 8 - Position of Rhode Island, 8-

Character of the delegates, 9 - Votes of individuals not to be recorded, 10–

Randolph opens the convention, 10— He proposes an outline of a constitution,

11- Proposal of Virginia to found representation on free inhabitants, 13 —

Charles Pinckney presents a plan, 14— Debates in committee, 14— Butler

supports the Virginia plan, 14 - Government must act on individuals, 15 —

Sherman not yet ready, 16 — Debate on equality of suffrage, 15 — Delaware

interposes, 16 — The legislature to be of two branches, 16 — One branch to be

directly chosen by the people, 17— Extent of the federal legislative powers, 17

- The right to negative any state law denied, 18 — Coercion of states, 19 —

The national executive, 19 - The mode of its election and its powers, 20.

Shall it be of one or more, 20— Sherman for its subordination to the legisla-

ture, 21 — Shall there be unity in the executive, 21 — Shall it be chosen by the

people, 21 — Its period of service, 22 - How to be chosen, 22 - How to be

removed, 23 — Speech of Dickinson for vote by states in one branch of the

legislature, 23 – Randolph proposes an executive of three members, 24 —

Opinions on an executive council, 24 — The executive to be single, 25 — The

veto power, 25 — The judiciary, 26 - Shall the house of representatives be

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The states and the nation, 47 — Independence declared unitedly, 48 — Con-
necticut takes the lead, 48 — Character of Roger Sherman, 48 — Of Johnson,
50— Of Ellsworth, 51 — Federal and national, 61 -Speech of Mason for two
branches, 52 — Sherman for two branches, 53 — The convention decides for
two branches, 54 — Wilson speaks for the general government and the state
governments, 55 — Ellsworth would graft a general government on the state
governments, 66 — The mode of choosing and term of office of the senators, 56

- The decision, 57 — Fierce contest between the smaller states and the large

ones, 58-— Franklin proposes prayer, 59 — The debate continues, 60 — Suffrage

in the first branch proportioned to population, 61- Ellsworth would have the

vote in the senate by states, 62-Speech of Baldwin, 62 - Wilson refuses to

yield, 62 - So does Madison, 63 — Persistence of Ellsworth, 64 — He is sup-

ported by North Carolina, 65 — The convention equally divided, 66 — Appoint-

ment of a grand committee to report a compromise, 67.

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Franklin's compromise, 68 — Morris claims representation for property, 69

– The ratio of representation referred to a committee, 70 - Report of the
committee, 71 – Appointment of a committee of one from each state, 72 — Its
report, 72 — Madison's proposal of compromise, 72 — Report of the new com.

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