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The following list of the members of the Crom- are corroborated by the testimony of the tombstone. well family buried at Bunbill Fields is compiled No doubt the author of the 'House of Cromwell' from Noble's House of Cromwell,' third edition, had often seen it. JOHN PICKFORD, M.A. 1787, vol. i. The book, though the author may Newbourne Rectory, Woodbridge. be incapable of estimating rightly the character of Mrs. Bridget Bendish, granddaughter of Oliver Oliver Cromwell, yet contains, at any rate, many | Cromwell, died at Southtown 1750. curious notices and anecdotes of the Protector and Mrs. Cromwell. lineally descended from Oliver bis alliances and descendants. The members of Cromwell, died at Yarmouth at an advanced age. the family interred in the above-named burial.

A nephew of the Protector was wounded, and place are descended from Henry Cromwell, the died, in an action with the Royalists. The fact is, fourth son of the Protector.

I think, recorded by Carlyle. 1. Henry Cromwell, commemorated on the

WILLIAM ST. CLAIR. tombstone, died at Lisbon September 11, 1711, and was buried at Lisbon ; major in the army.

“DEFENCE, NOT DEFIANCE": TAE VOLUNTEERS 2. Hannah Hewling, his wife, died March 26,

e, died March 26. I(7th S. iii. 206, 356, 430).-Fully admitting Capt. 1732, aged seventy years.

Hans Busk to have been the avant courier and 3. Mary, daughter of William Sherwill and

first advocate of the volunteer movement, it may wife of William Cromwell, died March 4, 1752,

not be inappropriate to the subject if I notice aged sixty-two years.

other names connected with the formation of this 4. William Cromwell, husband of the above,

patriotic home army, which excludes even a died July 9, 1772, aged seventy-nine years.

| thought of conscription. 6. Mary Cromwell, eldest daughter of Major

In Harper's (New York) edition of the Poet Henry Cromwell. died unmarriedo July 9. 1731. Laureate's ‘Poems,' published in 1873, at p. 250, aged forty years. Styled on the tombstone, “Mrs.

there is a rousing appeal to the manbood of the Cromwell, spinster."

nation, of four stanzas, called “The War. This 6. Richard Cromwell, fifth son of Major Henry

poem was sent to me on May 5, 1859, for anonymCromwell, died December 3, 1759.

ous insertion in any country paper, as it might be 7. Ann Cromwell, second daughter of Richard

thought political, and unbecoming the pen of the Cromwell, died September, 1777. It is said there

royal bard'; and it appeared in the Times of was no room for a memorial of her upon the tomb

May 9, 1859, signed T. It was, of course, a warnin Bunhill Fields, as all the spaces were filled up

ing against the “French colonels" and their chief, on it.

as “only the devil knows what he means." 8. Eleanor Cromwell, third daughter of Richard On May 29, 1859, General Peel, then Minister Cromwell, died February 24, 1727, aged two

of War, issued his order which sanctioned the months.

formation of volunteer corps in Great Britain ; 9. Thomas Cromwell, seventh son of Major

and on July 5, 1859, Lord Lyndhurst, who was Henry Cromwell, a grocer, died October 2, 1748,

then eighty-seven years old, threatened England aged fifty-one years.

with the danger of invasion, unless her fleet was 10. Oliver Cromwell, son of Thomas Cromwell, I

strengthened and a powerful reserve force maindied May 6, 1741, aged five years.

tained. Sir T. Martin says, in his admirable bio11. Henry Cromwell, son of Thomas Cromwell,

graphy of this great lawyer and statesman, “His died unmarried circa 1771.

eloquence went right to the heart of the nation, 12. Thomas Cromwell, son of Thomas Cromwell,

and the response came in the movement for formdied an infant.

ing a volunteer force, to which England may now 13. Elizabeth Cromwell, daughter of Thomas

look with some confidence in the hour of need. Cromwell, died an infant.

The “Isaiah of the nineteenth century," as I 14. Henry Cromwell, sixth son of Major Henry

have heard the poet justly called, is not afraid of Cromwell, died unmarried January 4, 1769, aged

speaking out ; no less stirring words than are seventy-one years.

found in his address to our riflemen are contained The tombstone at Bunhill Fields, said to have

in 'The Fleet.' ALFRED GATTY, D.D. been raised over the vault made by Richard. It is hardly fair to say that any one man was Cromwell, commemorates also “Mrs. Eleanor Gat-the originator of the present volunteer force, when ton, Widdow" (sic), his mother-in-law, who died so many were engaged in the work. It is indisSeptember 27, 1727, and Mrs. Eleanor Gracedieu, putable that a very large share of the glory and spinster, daughter of Sir Bartholomew Gracedieu, honour is due to the late Hans Busk of the VicKnt., died February 26, 1737, in the fifty-third torias and to Dr. Bucknill; but there were other year of her age. No doubt owing to the lapse of heads at work previously and contemporaneously time, these inscriptions have become illegible, but with them, notably Col. Kinlock, the brother in several records of the burials are taken from the arms of Sir De Lacy Evans and Lord Ranelagh, body of the work, some of which, though not all, and it is doubtful whether Hans Busk would have been able to overpower the scruples of the Govern- of Bedfont' and thirty-three " minor poems," most ment but for the weighty influence of the late Duke of which had appeared before. In the 'Memorials. of Wellington, who himself, only after considerable of Thomas Hood’ it is stated that “many copies difficulty, obtained permission to form the Royal remained unsold on the publishers' shelf," and Victoria Rifles (a shooting club) into a four-com- that Hood “afterwards bought up the remainder pany battalion, although it had existed as an armed of the edition, as he said himself, to save it from association ever since the general disbandment in the butter shops." See The Works of Thomas 1814. It seems that the earlier acceptance of the Hood,' vol. v. p. 212 and vol. x. p. 40. services of the Exeter corps was probably an acci

G. F. R. B. dent, very many other corps having in 1859 ob

The Plea of the Midsummer Fairies' was first tained precedence owing to similar circumstances.

published in 1827, with a dedication to Charles Even the pattern of uniform chosen affected this

Lamb. It was not immediately successful, and in result. It is, however, hardly worth while to revive the controversy as to the precedence of Devon

the Memorials of Thomas Hood,' by his son and and Middlesex: we of the latter county are very having it bought up the remainder of the edition

daughter, it is stated that Hood used to speak of well content to stand second.

to save it from the butter shops." I believe the E. T. Evans, Captain R.V.

poem is included in several cheap editions of A very early series of articles on the volunteer Hood's serious works.

C. C. B. system, if not the first, will be found in the Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, dating from 1837

This delightful poemand the following years. The volunteer system is Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathingadvocated as essential for the national defence was, I believe, first published in 1827. It was against invasion, and the application of the en dedicated in most graceful words to Charles Lamb, gineering and other resources of the country. who repaid Hood by a passing sweet “ Tale of the This subject will be found to be comprehensively Fairies," "The Defeat of Time Lamb calls this a dealt with from a military point of view.

meagre and harsh prose abstract of the first half of L. M. | The Plea,' but it is in Elia's finest style, and there

is little harshness in the words of Mercury even A friend of mine, since deceased, Capt. Evatt after the music of Apollo's lute. Acklom, late 16th Foot, often told me that his

My edition of Hood's 'Poems' is the twelfth father, whose initials I forget, Capt. — Acklom, (Moson, 1860), “a collection of Mr. Hood's serious was the prime mover in the volunteer movement

| poems, made in fulfilment of his own desire." of 1859. I do not notice his name mentioned in

JAMES BOOPER. the communications of your various contributors.

Oak Cottage, Streatham Place, S.W. EDWARD R. VYVYAN. *PLEA FOR THE MIDSUMMER FAIRIES' (7th S.

GOLDWYER OR GOLDWIRE FAMILY (7th S. iii. iii. 388).-In a very excellent weekly periodical

Do 249).- Possibly the following notes may be of which, however, had but a brief career-the

interest to MR. ARTHUR BAYLEY:Nlustrated Family Journal (London, J. Clayton,

"1673, Aug. 6. Henry Goldwyer instituted Vicar of

i Christchurch, Hants. M.A. 1685, of Wadham College, 1845), the two numbers, 20 and 21, for July 19 | Oxford. Buried Feb. 2. 1688, at Christchurch. See & and 26, are partly devoted to 'Illustrations of the letter to him from Lord Clarendon ("Warner,' ii., app., Genius of the late Thomas Hood.' A foot-note No. 28).” — Walcott's Memorials of Christchurch, says, “ From the Illuminated Magazine for July." | Twynham,' 1868, p. 81. I have the two volumes of Douglas Jerrold's Ilin.." 1699. William Goldwyer, Esq., admitted Free Burgess

of the Borough of Lymington, Hants."-St. Barbe's minated Magazine for 1845 ; but I cannot find in

* Records of the Borough of New Lymington' (privately them any article on Thomas Hood. In the second printed, circ, 1858). paper in the Illustrated Family Journal there is "1726. William Goldwyer, Esq., of Christchurch, a critique on “Hood's principal poetic production, admitted to same.”Ibid. in point of design and elaboration”-his. Plea of

"1726. Henry Goldwyer, of Exeter College, Oxford,

M.A. July 5."-Woodward and Wilks's 'Hampshire, (not " for '] the Midsummer Fairies.' Consider

iii. 134, note 3. able extracts are given from the poem, together with three graceful and fanciful illustrations by J.

1 I do not find the name in the list of priors of Franklin.

CUTHBERT BEDE.

Christchurch given by the Rev. M. E. C. Walcott.

The last prior was John Draper, who, upon the The Plea of the Midsummer Fairies, Hero and surrender of the priory, Nov. 28, 1539, was allowed Leander, Lycus the Centaur, and other Poems,' to retain Somerford Grange for life. It was the was published by the firm of Longman, Rees, property of the priory at least as early as 1291; it Orme, Brown & Green in 1827. It was dedicated must, therefore, have been subsequent to Draper's to Charles Lamb, and contained, besides the three death that it came into the possession of the Goldpieces mentioned in the title, The Two Peacocks wyer family.

The following list of the members of the Crom- are corroborated by the testimony of the tombstone. well family buried at Bunhill Fields is compiled No doubt the author of the House of Cromwell' from Noble's 'House of Cromwell,' third edition, had often seen it. JOHN PICKFORD, M.A. 1787, vol. i. The book, though the author may Newbourne Rectory, Woodbridge. be incapable of estimating rightly the character of Mrs. Bridget Bendish, granddaughter of Oliver Oliver Cromwell, yet contains, at any rate, many | Cromwell, died at Southtown 1750. curious notices and anecdotes of the Protector and

Mrs. Cromwell, lineally descended from Oliver bis alliances and descendants. The members of Cromwell, died at Yarmouth at an advanced age. the family interred in the above-named burial.

A nephew of the Protector was wounded, and place are descended from Henry Cromwell, the died, in an action with the Royalists. The fact is. fourth son of the Protector.

I think, recorded by Carlyle. 1. Henry Cromwell, commemorated on the

WILLIAM ST. CLAIR. tombstone, died at Lisbon September 11, 1711, and was buried at Lisbon ; major in the army.

"DEFENCE, NOT DEFIANCE". THE VOLUNTEERS 2. Hannah Hewling, his wife, died March 26,

(7th S. iii. 206, 356, 430).-Fully admitting Capt. 1732, aged seventy years.

Hans Busk to have been the avant courier and 3. Mary, daughter of William Sherwill and

first advocate of the volunteer movement, it may wife of William Cromwell, died March 4, 1752,

not be inappropriate to the subject if I notice aged sixty-two years.

other names connected with the formation of this 4. William Cromwell, husband of the above,

patriotic home army, which excludes even a died July 9, 1772, aged seventy-nine years.

thought of conscription. 5. Mary Cromwell, eldest daughter of Major

In Harper's (New York) edition of the Poet Henry Cromwell. died unmarried July 9. 1731. Laureate's ‘Poems,' published in 1873, at p. 250, aged forty years.' Styled on the tombstone, “Mrs.

there is a rousing appeal to the manhood of the Cromwell, spinster."

| nation, of four stanzas, called “The War.' This 6. Richard Cromwell, fifth son of Major Henry

poem was sent to me on May 5, 1859, for anonymCromwell, died December 3, 1759.

ous insertion in any country paper, as it might be 7. Ann Cromwell, second daughter of Richard | thought political, and unbecoming the pen of the Cromwell, died September, 1777. It is said there

royal bard'; and it appeared in the Times of was no room for a memorial of her upon the tomb

May 9, 1859, signed T. It was, of course, a warnin Bunhill Fields, as all the spaces were filled uping, ag

ing against the “ French colonels" and their chief, on it.

as “only the devil knows what he means." 8. Eleanor Cromwell, third daughter of Richard

On May 29, 1859, General Peel, then Minister Cromwell, died February 24, 1727, aged two

of War, issued his order which sanctioned the months.

| formation of volunteer corps in Great Britain ; 9. Thomas Cromwell, seventh son of Major

and on July 5, 1859, Lord Lyndhurst, who was Henry Cromwell, a grocer, died October 2, 1748,

then eighty-seven years old, threatened England aged fifty-one years.

with the danger of invasion, unless her fleet was 10. Oliver Cromwell, son of Thomas Cromwell,

strengthened and a powerful reserve force maindied May 6, 1741, aged five years.

tained. Sir T. Martin says, in his admirable bio11. Henry Cromwell, son of Thomas Cromwell,

graphy of this great lawyer and statesman, “His died unmarried circa 1771.

eloquence went right to the heart of the nation, 12. Thomas Cromwell, son of Thomas Cromwell,

and the response came in the movement for formdied an infant.

ing a volunteer force, to which England may now 13. Elizabeth Cromwell, daughter of Thomas

look with some confidence in the hour of need. Cromwell, died an infant.

The “Isaiah of the nineteenth century," as I 14. Henry Cromwell, sixth son of Major Henry

have heard the poet justly called, is not afraid of Cromwell, died unmarried January 4, 1769, aged

speaking out ; no less stirring words than are seventy-one years.

* found in his address to our riflemen are contained The tombstone at Bunhill Fields, said to have

in 'The Fleet.' ALFRED GATTY, D.D. been raised over the vault made by Richard. It is hardly fair to say that any one man was Cromwell, commemorates also “Mrs. Eleanor Gat- the originator of the present volunteer force, when ton, Widdow" (sic), his mother-in-law, who died so many were engaged in the work. It is indisSeptember 27, 1727, and Mrs. Eleanor Gracedieu, putable that a very large share of the glory and spinster, daughter of Sir Bartholomew Gracedieu, honour is due to the late Hans Busk of the VicKnt., died February 26, 1737, in the fifty-third torias and to Dr. Bucknill ; but there were other year of her age. No doubt owing to the lapse of heads at work previously and contemporaneously time, these inscriptions have become illegible, but with them, notably Col. Kinlock, the brother in several records of the burials are taken from the arms of Sir De Lacy Evans and Lord Ranelagh, body of the work, some of which, though not all, and it is doubtful whether Hans Busk would have been able to overpower the scruples of the Govern- of Bedfont and thirty-three " minor poems,” most ment but for the weighty influence of the late Duke of which had appeared before. In the Memorials of Wellington, who himself, only after considerable of Thomas Hood’it is stated that “ many copies difficulty, obtained permission to form the Royal remained unsold on the publishers' shelf," and Victoria Rifles (a shooting club) into a four-com- that Hood "afterwards bought up the remainder pany battalion, although it had existed as an armed of the edition, as he said himself, to save it from association ever since the general disbandment in the butter shops.” See The Works of Thomas 1814. It seems that the earlier acceptance of the Hood,' vol. v. p. 212 and vol. x. p. 40. services of the Exeter corps was probably an acci

G. F. R. B. dent, very many other corps having in 1859 obtained precedence owing to similar circumstances.

The Plea of the Midsummer Fairies' was first Even the pattern of uniform chosen affected this

published in 1827, with a dedication to Charles result. It is, however, hardly worth while to re

Lamb. It was not immediately successful, and in

the Memorials of Thomas Hood,' by his son and vive the controversy as to the precedence of Devon and Middlesex: we of the latter county are very

daughter, it is stated that Hood used to speak of well content to stand second.

having “bought up the remainder of the edition E. T. Evans, Captain R. V.

to save it from the butter shops.” I believe the

poem is included in several cheap editions of A very early series of articles on the volunteer Hood's serious works.

C. C. B. system, if not the first, will be found in the Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, dating from 1837

This delightful poemand the following years. The volunteer system is Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathingadvocated as essential for the national defence was, I believe, first published in 1827. It was against invasion, and the application of the en. dedicated in most graceful words to Charles Lamb, gineering and other resources of the country. who repaid Hood by a passing sweet “ Tale of the This subject will be found to be comprehensively Fairies," "The Defeat of Time. Lamb calls this & dealt with from a military point of view.

meagre and harsh prose abstract of the first half of L. M. The Plea,' but it is in Elia's finest style, and there

is little harshness in the words of Mercury even A friend of mine, since deceased, Capt. Evatt

after the music of Apollo's lute. Acklom, late 16th Foot, often told me that his

My edition of Hood's 'Poems' is the twelfth father, whose initials I forget, Capt. – Acklom, (Moson, 1860). “ a collection of Mr. Hood's serious was the prime mover in the volunteer movement of 1859. I do not notice his name mentioned in

poems, made in fulfilment of his own desire."

JAMES HOOPER. the communications of your various contributors. Oak Cottage, Streatham Place, s.W.

EDWARD R. VYVYAN. PLEA FOR THE MIDSUMMER FAIRIES' (7th S.

GOLDWYER OR GOLDWIRE FAMILY (7th S. iii. iii. 388).-In a very excellent weekly periodical

249).-Possibly the following notes may be of which, however, had but a brief career-the

interest to MR. ARTHUR BAYLEY :Illustrated Family Journal (London, J. Clayton,

“1673, Aug. 6. Henry Goldwyer instituted Vicar of

Christchurch, Hants. M.A. 1685, of Wadham College, 1845), the two numbers, 20 and 21, for July 19

Oxford, Buried Feb, 2, 1688, at Christchurch. See a and 26, are partly devoted to 'Illustrations of the letter to him from Lord Clarendon ('Warner,' ii., app., Genius of the late Thomas Hood. A foot-note No. 28).” — Walcott's Memorials of Christchurch, says,“ From the Illuminated Magazine for July.” | Twynham,' 1868, p. 81. I have the two volames of Douglas Jerrold's Illu.

|"1699. William Goldwyer, Esq., admitted Free Burgess minated Magazine for 1845 ; but I cannot find in

of the Borough of Lymington, Hants."-St. Barbe's

| Records of the Borough of New Lymington' (privately them any article on Thomas Hood. In the second printed, circ, 1858). paper in the Illustrated Family Journal there is "1726. William Goldwyer, Esq., of Christchurch, & critique on “Hood's principal poetic production, I admitted to same.”Ibid. in point of design and elaboration”_his · Plea of

1726. Henry Goldwyer, of Exeter College, Oxford, (not " for "] the Midsummer Fairies.

M.A. July 5."-Woodward and Wilks's Hampshire,

Consider- lüü. 134. note 3. able extracts are given from the poem, together with three graceful and fanciful illustrations by J.

I do not find the name in the list of priors of Franklin.

CUTHBERT BEDE.

Christchurch given by the Rev. M. E. C. Walcott.

The last prior was John Draper, who, upon the "The Plea of the Midsummer Fairies, Hero and surrender of the priory, Nov. 28, 1539, was allowed Leander, Lycus the Centaur, and other Poems,' to retain Somerford Grange for life. It was the was published by the firm of Longman, Rees, I property of the priory at least as early as 1291; it Orme, Brown & Green in 1827. It was dedicated must, therefore, have been subsequent to Draper's to Charles Lamb, and contained, besides the three death that it came into the possession of the Goldpieces mentioned in the title, 'The Two Peacocks wyer family.

I have not access to the index to, or a complete Bede records an eclipse of the sun fourteen days copy of, Woodward and Wilks, nor to Warner's before the kalends of March, 538, from early morn'Hampshire Collections,'both of which might pro-ing till 9 a.m. This is only one day out; it should be bably yield additional information.

fifteen instead of fourteen, i.e., February 15, and

J. S. ATTWOOD. the eclipse began at 8.30. Under 540 he correctly Exeter.

records the eclipse of June 20, adding," the stars

showed themselves full nigb half an hour after The only references to this family I am ac

nine in the forenoon " (trans. in 'Mon. Hist. Brit.'). quainted with are the following:-1. Hutchins's

The writer of the ‘Annales Northanhumbrenses,' History of Dorset,' vol. iii. p. 80 (second edition), |

appended to Bede ('Mon. Hist. Brit.,' p. 288), in a pedigree of Hussey :

was particular in recording eclipses. In 756 (it George Goldwyre, of Somerford Grange, Hants.

should be 751) fifth (should be fifteenth) year of

King Eadbort, there were two eclipses within the Francis Fry, of Somer-Henri. a daughterWilliam month of January, of the sun on the 9th and the ford Grange, son of | etta.

Bower,

moon on the 24tb. No total eclipse of the sun John Fry, of Alver

had been witnessed in London since March 20, diston, Wilts, who

Bristol.

1139/40, until the last century. died Mar, 18, 1726.

A list of recorded comets and historical notices of some eclipses may be found in Chambers's 'De

A list of Philadelphia Fry=William Bower. clerk. Rector of scriptive Astronomy and other books. died March, Edmundesham and Sutton Wald the November or St. Leopards meteors recorded is

1791. rond, Dorset, died Jan. 7, 1782. given in an article in the Edinburgh Review, 2. Burke's History of tbe Commoners,' vol. i. | January, 1867.

A. S. ELLIS. p. 673:-Elizabeth Goldwyre married Thomas

Westminster. rley, of the Broad, Sussex, on June 1, 1829. A very complete catalogue of the earthquakes She was the widow of Charles Blagrave, Esq., of (with the places of their occurrence) of which Berkeley Square, and sole heiress of James Hill, records could be found, from the earliest times of Prospect Hill, Berks. There are several his to the year 1842, was published by Mallet in the tories of Hampshire that MR. BAYLEY might con. Reports of the British Association for the years sult.

1852, 1853, and 1854. In the third edition of I shall esteem it a favour if MR. ARTHUR Mr. Chambers’s ‘Handbook of Descriptive AstroBAYLEY will let me have any particulars of dates nomy' is given a catalogue of comets observed up of deaths, marriages, baptisms he may come across to the year 1874. A very interesting little work, in relation to the Fry family, as I am engaged on which will probably answer your correspondent's a pedigree of that family.

E. A. Fry. purpose concerning eclipses, was published by the Yarty, King's Norton, near Birmingham.

Rev. S. J. Johnson in 1874 under the title JACOB THE APOSTLE (7th S. u. 248. 375. 503). 1'Eclipses, Past and Future '(James Parker & Co.).

W. T. LYNN. - It is worthy of notice that the apostle generally

Blackheath. known by the English form James, akin to the Italian Giacomo, is commemorated under the form! Since the date of my former communication I Jacob in one of the old parish churches of Bristol, have received the June part of the Monthly Notices which is always known as St. Philip and Jacob's.' of the Royal Astronomical Society, from which I

E. VENABLES. send the following extract:EARTHQUAKES, ECLIPSES, AND COMETS (7th S.

“The accompanying MS. volume (placed in the iii. 409, 484).-In 'L'Art de Vérifier les Dates des

Library) gives eclipses in this country for a period of

about 2,000 years, from A.D. 538 to 1.D. 2500, being re. Faits Historiques' (vol. i.) will be found a useful, corded ones of both luminaries from the date of the trustworthy, calculated chronology of eclipses, both first in 538 to 1200; all solar eclipses visible here from B.C. and A.D., down to the year 2000, of the moon as

A.D. 1200 to A.D. 2200, omitting & very few in which

scarcely a tenth of the sun's diameter is obscured, includ. well as of the sun, and giving, besides the day and

ing lunar ones for a certain period and large solar hour of commencement, the course of the shadow eclipses from A.D. 2200 to A.D. 2500." on the earth. This work, in many volumes, a

EVERARD HOME COLEMAN. monument of the critical industry of the Bene

71, Brecknock Road. dictines, may be found on the shelves in the Reading Room of the British Museum. This list is SIR THOMAS ERPINGHAM (7th S. iii. 309, 398). very useful to the historian for testing and correct- -Sir Thomas Erpingham was a witness in the ing dates in the chronicles. The eclipse of the Scrope and Grosvenor controversy in 1386. His sun found to have occurred August 31, 1030, fixes deposition is on the roll (vol. i. p. 59). His the exact date of the battle of Stiklestad, in Nor- age at that time is not given, but from the editor's way, wherein St. Olaf fell.

note in vol. ii. p. 194 there is good evidence for

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