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-He is in love. With who?- now that is your grace's part. Mark, how short his answer is : With Hero, Leonato's short daughter.

Claud. If this were so, so were it uttered.'

Bene. Like the old tale, my lord: it is not so, nor 'twas not so; but, indeed, God forbid it should be so.

Claud. If my passion change not shortly, God forbid it should be otherwise.

D. Pedro. Amen, if you love her; for the lady is very well worthy.

Claud. You speak this to fetch me in, my lord.
D. Pedro. By my troth, I speak my thought. -
Claud. And, in faith, my lord, I spoke mine.

Bene. And, by my two faiths and troths, my lord, I spoke mine.

Claud. That I love her, I fcel.
D. Pedro. That she is worthy, I know.

Bene. That I neither feel how she should be loved, nor know how she should be worthy, is the opinion that fire cannot melt out of me; I will die in it at the stake.

D. Pedro. Thou wast ever an obstinate heretick in the despite of beauty. .

Claud. And never could maintain his part, but in the force of his will.

Bene. That a woman conceived ine, I thank her; that she brought me up, I likewise give her most humble thanks : but that I will have a recheat winded in my forehead, or hang iny bugle in an

bord, I

That

she is w

Claud. If this were so, so were it uttered.] i. e. If I had really confided such a secret to him, he would have blabbed it in this manner.

but that I will have a recheat rinded in my forehead,] That is, I will wear a horn on my forehead which the huntsman may blow. A recheate is the sound by which dogs are called back. Shakspeare had no mercy upon the poor cuckold, his horn is an inexhaustible subject of merriinent. JOHNSON.

invisible baldrick, all: women shall pardon me: Because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will do myself the right to trust none; and the fine is, (for the which I may go the finer,) I will live a bachelor.

D. Pedro. I shall see thee, ere I die, look pale with love.

Bene. With anger, with sickness, or with hun. ger, my lord ; not with love: prove, that ever I lose more blood with love, than I will get again with drinking, pick out mine eyes with a balladmaker's pen, and hang me up at the door of a brothel-house, for the sign of blind Cupid.

D. Pedro. Well, if ever thou dost fall from this faith, thou wilt prove a notable argument.

Bene. If I do, hang me in a bottle like a cat, and shoot at me; and he that hits me, let him be clapped on the shoulder, and called Adam.*

D. Pedro. Well, as time shall try :
In time the savage bull doth bear the yoke.

Bene. The savage bull may; but if ever the sensible Benedick bear it, pluck off the bull's horns, and set them in my forehead: and let me be vilely painted; and in such great letters as they write, Here is good horse to hire, let them signify under my sign,—Here you may see Benedick the married man. : Claud. If this should ever happen, thou would'st be horn mad.

3 — in a bottle like a cat,] In some counties in England, a cat was formerly closed up with a quantity of soot in a wooden bottle, (such as that in which shepherds carry their liquor,) and was suspended on a line. He who beat out the bottom as he ran under it, and was nimble enough to escape its contents, was regarded as the hero of this inhuman diversion. Steevens. . __ and he that hits me, let him be clapped on the shoulder, and called Adam.) Perhaps Adam Bell, a famous archer.

s In time the savage bull doth bear the yoke.] A line from The Spanish Tragedy, or Hieronymo, &c.

D. Pedro. Nay, if Cupid have not spent all his quiver in Venice, thou wilt quake for this shortly.

Bene. I look for an earthquake too then. · D. Pedro. Well, you will temporize with the hours. In the mean time, good signior Benedick, repair to Leonato's; commend me to him, and tell him, I will not fail him at supper; for, indeed, he hath made great preparation.

Bene. I have almost matter enough in me for such an embassage; and so I commit you

Claud. To the tuition of God: From my house, (if I had it) ' D. Pedro. The sixth of July: Your loving friend, Benedick.

Bene. Nay, mock not, mock not: The body of your discourse is sometime guarded with fragments, and the guards are but slightly basted on neither : ere you flout old ends any further,” examine your conscience; and so I leave you. [Erit BENEDICK. Claud. My liege, your highness now may do me

good. D. Pedro. My love is thine to teach ; teach it

but how, And thou shalt see how apt it is to learn Any hard lesson that may do thee good.

Claud. Hath Leonato any son, my lord ?

D. Pedro. No child but Hero, she's his only heir:
Dost thou affect her, Claudio ?
Claud.

O my lord,
When you went onward on this ended action,
I look'd upon her with a soldier's eye,
That lik’d, but had a rougher task in hand
Than to drive liking to the name of love :

And thou shalt that may do thee my lord ?

6- guarded with fragments,] Guards were ornamental lace or borders.

7- ere you flout old ends, &c.] Before you endeavour to distinguish yourself any more by antiquated allusions.

But now I am return'd, and that war-thoughts
Have left their places vacant, in their rooms
Come thronging soft and delicate desires,
All prompting me how fair young Hero is,
Saying, I lik'd her ere I went to wars.

D. Pedro. Thou wilt be like a lover presently,
And tire the hearer with a book of words :
If thou dost love fair Hero, cherish. it; . -
And I will break with her, and with her father,
And thou shalt have her: Was't not to this end,
That thou began'st to twist so fine a story?

Claud. How sweetly do you minister to love, That know love's grief by his complexion ! But lest my liking might too sudden seem, I would have salv'd it with a longer treatise. D Pedro. What need the bridge much broader

than the floodi The fairest grant is the necessity : Look, what will serve, is fit: 'tis once, thou lov’st;a And I will fit thee with the remedy. I know, we shall have revelling to-night; I will assume thy part in some disguise, And tell fair Hero I am Claudio; And in her bosom I'll unclasp my heart, And take her hearing prisoner with the force And strong encounter of my amorous tale : Then, after, to her father will I break; And, the conclusion is, she shall be thine: In practice let us put it presently. [Ereunt.

o 'tis once, thou lovost ;] Once may mean “ once for all,” ~" 'tis enough to say at once." STEEVEN.

SCENE II.

A Room in Leonato's House.

Enter LEONATO and ANTONIO,

Leon. How now, brother? Where is my cousin, your son ? Hath he provided this musick

Ant. He is very busy about it. But, brother, I can tell you strange news that you yet dreamed not

of.

Leon. Are they good

Ant. As the event stamps them; but they have a good cover, they show well outward. The prince and Count Claudio, walking in a thick-pleached alley' in my orchard, were thus much overheard by a man of mine: The prince discovered to Claudio, that he loved my neice your daughter, and meant to acknowledge it this night in a dance; and, if he found her accordant, he meant to take the present time by the top, and instantly break with you of it.

Leon. Hath the fellow any wit, that told you this ?

Ant. A good sharp fellow; I will send for him, and question him yourself.

Leon. No, no; we will hold it as a dream, till it appear itself:—but I will acquaint my daughter withal, that she may be the better prepared for an answer, if peradyenture this be true. Go you, and tell her of it. [Several persons cross the stage.] Cousins, you know what you have to do.-0, I cry you mercy, friend: you go with me, and I will use your skill :-Good cousins, have a care this busy time.

[Ereunt. ' a thick-pleached alley-] i.e. thickly interwoven.

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