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ited an entrance here—to be clothed with the censure his treatment of our favors has merited.

Again has the sensational pabular spoken in his native dialect. I send the characteristic effusion published in the Charleston News of the 17th instant to the Chair, and ask that the Clerk may read it.

The Clerk read as follows:

“Too SENSITIVE BY ONE-HALF.—Messrs. Hayes, Owens and Foster were announced this morning as a Committee on the part of the Senate to investigate the affairs of the Land Commission.

On hearing these names announced, Whittemore, who has been endeavoring to give himself prominence in this investigating business, stung with disappointment at not hearing his name, rose excitedly to a question of privilege, and took exception to the following paragraph from your correspondence of the 12th instant:

"It may be well to explain just here that the main fight on this land investigation business will be, and was, as well, on the appointment of persons on the Committee. It seemed to be the idea that there was to be some considerable pabulum coming from it, and for this reason Whittemore wantedto place himself on the Committee. But he failed, and must feel disappointed.”

Among other things, he said: I simply cast the imputation back into the face of the author, and say, as I dismiss this Bohemian:

“ That all men must serve their time to every trade,

Save falsehood;

Liars are already made.” Coming from a gentleman this would be insulting, but the known character of Whittemore vitiates its force.

Now, it will be observed that Whittemore has “ gone off too quick on the trigger," for I did not accuse him of seeking pabulum, but said, substantially, that the opposition his scheme received in the Senate was on account of his associates suspecting him of it. This suspicion is natural to minds whose recollection of Whittemore's recent career is fresh.

I will take no further notice of him than to repeat a little.story: The Rev. Lyman Beecher was once thoughtfully returning from church, walking with a book under his arm, when he observed a peculiar looking little animal in the road. Obeying a natural impulse, he threw his book at it. A pungent odor instantly became apparent, accompanied with a disastrous effect on Beecher's clothes. Mr. Beecher resolved never again to issue a volume against a skunk. No more will I.”

Now, Mr. President, this crafty scribbler—this foxy dissembler-not anxious to give a faithful chronicle of events, or to quote in full the

remarks I made the other day, upon his mendacious course, attempts, by a mosaic of falsehoods, to extricate himself from the mire in which he has been wallowing, and to besmear “my associates," honorable Senators, with his scurrilous imputations.

His mixed accusations are the outgrowth of the elements that make up his dwarfed and tainted nature. He cannot tell the truth

"For falsehoods dance upon his lips

As soot-flakes on a burning bar.” That I was to be upon the Special Committee to investigate the affairs of the Land Commission, no one expected—not even the Bohemian himself, for that matter had been decided by the vote of the Senate, and the investigation taken out of the hands of the Committee on Public Lands, of which I am the Chairman.

This willing servant of falsehood again says: “He did not accuse me of seeking pabulum, but that my associates suspected me of it, and hence the opposition to my scheme.” He asserts this in the face of his notorious paragraph, which I quote again:

"It may be well to explain just here that the main fight on this land investigating business will be, and was, as well on the appointment of persons on the Committee. It seemed to be the idea that there was to be some considerable pabulum coming from it, and for this reason Whittemore wanted to place himself on the Committee. But he failed, and must feel disappointed.”

A twice told lie!

His allusion to my “recent career”—the unparalleled, unjust, cruel persecution through which I have passed-I forgive. He has no humanity in his composition, and out of the vacant narrowness of his soul he has spoken.

His “ little story," so quaintly told, is but an autobiography. He is not too young in years to have lived when the venerable Beecher walked from church; and, if rumor is not like himself, he must have often crossed the path of that eminent divine. It is easy, then, to see who "the little animal" was, and to-day he smells as pungent as when the “ thoughtful” preacher cast his volume at him. He has changed his name, but not his odor. His presence is as intolerable now as then. The skunk has taken on the fox's skin, and it were well if we were rid of him. Hic jacet Reynard.

Mr. President, were it not for the special interposition of the friends of this violator of extended rights—for even he has friends—I should move for his expulsion from this floor; but I refrain once more, and give him a second warning. If he continues to attack the motives or charac

ters of Senators, I shall insist that he be denied the further privileges ac. corded reporters here.

PAPERS FROM THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

The House sent to the Senate,

MESSAGE No. 8 FROM HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

COLUMBIA, S. C., December 17, 1870. Mr. President and Gentleman of the Senate :

The House of Representatives respectfully informs your honorable body that they agree to the request for appointment of a Committee of Conference, to adjust differences as to amendment to Senate Bill to make appropriation for the payment of per diem and mileage of members of the General Assembly, &c., and Messrs. Whipper, Gardner, Hurley, Bosemon and Briggs, have been appointed a Committee on the part of the House, to meet similar Committee appointed by your honorable body. Very respectfully, &c.

F. J. MOSES, JR.,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. MESSAGE No. 9 FROM HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTVTIVES,

COLUMBIA, S. C. December 17, 1870. Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate :

The House of Representatives respectfully informs your honorable body that Messrs Mobley, Jervey and O'Connell, have been appointed Committee, on the part of the House, to meet similar Committee appointed on the part of your honorable body, to investigate the Constabulary Department. Very respectfully, &c.

F. J. MOSES, Jr,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. COMMUNICATION FROM THE STATE TREASURER.

The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the following:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

STATE TREASURY OFFICE,

COLUMBIA, S. C., December 19, 1870. To the Honorable the Senate of South Carolina.

GENTLEMEN : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Concurrent Resolution, inquiring why certain accounts of teachers for services rendered have not been paid, and to submit, in reply, that the cause of delay in the payment of these claims arose from delay of the State Auditor, (which delay by him was caused by the tardiness of Counties to send in their returns promptly, as instructed by his Circular, a copy of which is herewith enclosed,) to render the return to this office, thereby making it necessary for me to stop payment until accounts of “Free Schools” could be properly apportioned.

By reference to the report of the State Auditor, (annual,) it will be seen that five of the Counties, to that date, have failed to make the necessary returns.

The report of the Auditor of those who have done so, has but recently been received, and no further delay in payment will ensue than that-say one week-caused by making the transfer and apportionment of the accounts to “ Free Schools.”

I am, very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,

NILES G. PARKER,
Treasurer State of South Carolina.

[Circular]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF AUDITOR OF STATE,

COLUMBIA, S. C., September 19, 1870. Mr.

County Auditor, -- -,S C. DEAR SIR : The enclosed blank forms for County Auditor's settlement with County Treasurer for 1868 and 1869, are sent you to be filled up and completed by the 1st of November, so that they will reach this office, at the latest, by the 5th of that month, in order that the State Auditor and Comptroller-General may be enabled to make their report in time for the meeting of the General Assembly.

Any information asked, concerning filling up the blanks, will be cheerfully given.

Yours, respectfully,
REUBEN TOMLINSON,

State Auditor.
A true copy.
John McCord,

Chief Clerk Auditor's Office. Received as information.

PETITIONS, &c. Mr. SMALLS presented the petition of the County Commissioners of Beaufort County, praying that they be relieved from payment of the

Stenographer of the Courts; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

Mr. OWENS presented the accounts of the Spartanburg Republican, for advertising; which were referred to the Committee on Claims.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES.

Mr. WHITTEMORE, from the Committee on Engrossed Bills, reported as duly and correctly engrossed, and ready for a third reading,

A Bill to vest the right and title of the State in and to certain escheated property in a certain person therein mentioned ;

Bill to extend the time for officers to qualify.
The above Bills were taken up for a third reading.

Bill to vest the right and title of the State in and to certain escheated property in a certain person therein mentioned.

The Bill received its third reading, passed, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.

Bill to extend the time for officers to qualify.
The Bill received its third reading.

Ordered, That the title thereof be changed to that of an Act, and that it be enrolled.

Mr. CARDOZO, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as duly and correctly enrolled, and ready for ratification :

Joint Resolution authorizing State Librarian to cause to be prepared an index to Volume 14 of the Statutes of this State.

A message was sent to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, inviting him to attend in the Senate to assist in the ratification of the above Joint Resolution.

Mr. WIMBUSH, from the Committee on Contingent Accounts and Expenses, to whom were referred sundry contingent accounts against the Senate, reported back the same, with the recommendation that they be paid.

On motion of Mr. LESLIE, the Rule was suspended, and the Report considered immediately.

The question was taken on agreeing to the Report, and decided in the affirmative.

RESOLUTIONS.

Mr. ARNIM introduced the following Resolution:

Resolved, That the message of the House of Representatives relating to the impeachment of T. O. P. Vernon, Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit of South Carolina, be referred to a Select Committee of five, to be appointed by the Chair, to consider and report thereon ; also, to pre

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