Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

remuneration for the services of the militia and volunteers of this State in the battle of Plattsburgh."

And it was passed in concurrence.

(H. 135.) On motion of Mr. Briggs, the vote refusing the third reading to the House bill entitled an act relating to the duties of Chancellor," was reconsidered.

And the bill was read the third time and passed in concurrence.

(S. 28.) The Senate proceeded to consider the amendments of the House of Representatives to the bill entitled "an act in amendment of an act in relation to the militia," which are as follows:

Insert in section 6, after the words “ministers of the gospel,” the words “ members of the religious denomination of quakers;" and add to the bill as follows:

“Section 22. The clerk of each company shall, on or before the second Tuesday in June annually, make return of the name of each member of said company who shall be fully uniformed and equipped, to the clerk of the town where such member resides."

And it was resolved to concur in adopting said amendments.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Merrill, their Clerk:

MR. PRESIDENT:The House of Representatives have further considered their amendment to the Senate bill (S. 33,) entitled “ an act relating to repairs of bridges," and have resolved to adhere thereto.

The House concur with the Senate in passing the resolutions relative to repudiation of State Debts; and have passed a resolution relative to the debentures of officers of the Senate and House of Representatives who are appointed by the Sergeant-at-Arms, in which they request the concurrence of the Senate.

(S. 10.) The Senate proceeded to consider the amendment of the House of Representatives to the bill entitled “an'act to pay William Maxham the sum therein mentioned,” which is as follows:

Strike out the words “and interest on the same amounting to $7,38." And it was resolved to concur therein.

The resolution from the House of Representatives relative to the debentures of officers appointed by the Sergeant-at-Arms, was read and passed in concurrence.

A message from His Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Hale, Secretary of Civil and Military Affairs :

MR. PRESIDENT:-I am directed by the Governor to inform the Senate that he has this day approved and signed Senate bills No. 37, No. 38, No. 29, No. 2, No. 8, No. 31, No. 22, and No. 16.

(S. 33.) The Senate proceeded further to consider the amendment of the House of Representatives to the bill entitled “an act relating to repairs of bridges."

And resolved to adhere to their disagreement thereto.
So the bill was lost.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Merrill, their Clerk:

MR. PRESIDENT:-The House have passed certain resolutions relative to the existing Tariff; a resolution relative to the fine imposed on Gen. Jackson by Judge Hall; and a resolution providing for a suspension of the 13th Joint Rule, in each of which they request the concurrence of the Senate.

The Resolutions from the House of Representatives relative to the existing Tariff, were read.

Mr. Farr moved that they be laid on the table.
Which motion was lost.
And they were, thereupon, passed in concurrence.

(H. 91.) Mr. Sprague, from the Committee of free conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses, on the House bill entitled "an act providing for the collection of taxes assessed on real estate," reported that they had met the conferees on the part of the House of Representatives, and that they had agreed that the said conferees on the part of the House should recommend to the House of Representatives to recede from their disagreement to the amendment of the Senate.

The Senate took up the resolution from the House of Representatives, providing for a suspension of the 13th Joint Rule until 11 o'clock this evening.

And it was read and passed in concurrence.
Mr. Scott, from the Committee on Bills, made the following report:

The Committee on Bills report that they have, this day, presented to the Governor for his approval and signature, bills of the following titles :

(S. 36.) “An act relating to the grand list, in alteration of an act approved Nov. 11, 1841."

(H. 92.) “An act assessing a tax for the support of Government."
(H. 135.) “ An act relating to the duties of Chancellors."
(H. 108.) “An act for the protection of personal liberty."
(H. 17.) '“ An act relating to the sale of property on execution."

(S. 35.) “ An act relating to the sale of property on mesne process, in addition to chapter 28 of the Revised Statutes."

(S. 5.) “ An act relating to assignments." (S. 23.) “An act in addition to an act in relation to the militia." (S. 10.) “An act to pay William Maxham the sum therein mentioned.” (S. 28.) “ An act in amendment of an act in relation to the militia.”

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Merrill, their Clerk:

MR. PRESIDENT:-The House of Representatives have passed a bill (H. 133,) entitled "an act relating to the Bank of Poultney," in which they request the concurrence of the Senate.

(H. 91.) The House have adopted the report of the Committee of free conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the bill entitled “an act providing for the collection of taxes assessed on real estate," and recede from their disagreement to the amendment of the Senate, and have resolved to concur therein.

The Senate proceeded to consider the resolutions from the House of Representatives (see House Journal,) relative to the repayment of the fine imposed by Judge Dominick llall, on General Jackson.

And they were read.
Mr. Cahoon moved that the said resolutions be indefinitely postponed.

And on this question, Mr. Butler demanded the yeas and nays, which were as follows:

Those Senators who voted in the affirmative are,

Messrs. Bass, Butler, Cahoon, Farr, Griswold, Scott and Sprague—7.
Those Senators who voted in the negative are,
Messrs. A. Allen, E. Allen, Briggs, Cutts, Field, Green, Hubbard, Por-
ter, Plumb, Read, Sabin, Sargeant and Stone-13.

So the motion was lost.
Mr. Cahoon moved that the said resolutions be laid on the table.
Which motion was rejected.

And the question being, Will the Senate pass the resolutions in concurrence?

The yeas and nays, being demanded by Mr. Farr, were as follows:
Those Senators who voted in the affirmative are,

Messrs. A. Allen, E. Allen, Briggs, Cutts, Field, Green, Hubbard, Porter, Plumb, Read, Sabin, Sargeant and Starr -]3.

Those Senators who voted in the negative are,
Messrs. Bass, Butler, Cahoon, Farr, Griswold, Scott and Sprague—7.
So the resolutions were passed in concurrence.

A message from His Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Hale, Secretary of Civil and Military Affairs :

MR. PRESIDENT:--I am directed by the Governor to inform the Senate that he has this day approved and signed Senate bills No. 5, No. 36, No. 35, No. 10, and No. 23.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Merrill, their Clerk :

MR. PRESIDENT:-The House of Representatives do not concur in passing the bills from the Senate entitled

(§. 14.). "An act in amendment of an act approved Nov. 12, 1842, relating to advertisement of lands to be sold for taxes," and

(§. 39.) “An act relating to the first and second Judicial Circuits." .

His Excellency the Governor has announced to the House that he has this day approved and signed the following House bills :-No. 92, No. 135, No. 108, No. 2, No, 121, No. 90, No. 130, No. 128, No. 78, No. 54, No. 82, No. 122, No. 81, No. 129, No. 124, No. 89, No. 127, No. 105, No. 68, No. 80, No. 119, No. 107, No. 117, No. 125, No. 98, No. 123, and No. 131.

(S. 6.) The House do not concur with the Senate in passing the bill entitled “an act relating to the punishment of capital criines.”

Mr. Cahoon presented the following resolution:

Resolved, That the thanks of the Senate bę cordially tendered to His Honor, Horace Eaton, for the able, impartial and courteous mannner, in which he has discharged the duties of its presiding officer during the present session of the General Assembly.

And it was read and unanimously passed.
Whereupon the President addressed the Senate as follows:
Gentlemen of the Senate,-

While I am constrained to regard the expressions of kindness just tendered me as the tribute of generosity rather than of justice, I feel bound to return you for it my most cordial acknowledgements; for although undeserved, I cannot doubt that it is heartfelt and sincere. In the adoption of the resolution which you have just passed, there is implied a readiness on your part to overlook my errors, and I too will pass them by, with the bare remark that I am conscious they have not been few.

I have received from you, gentlemen, during the session, all that generous aid which I presumed to anticipate; and I trust the magnanimity and

kindness which prompted you to render it, are duly appreciated, and will be long and gratefully remembered.

To speak now of yourselves more especially, irrespective of your relations to your presiding officer, permit me to say, that in the gentlemanly character of your intercourse with each other, in the elevation of the motives by which you have seemed to be actuated, and in the ability with which you have transacted the business of the session, if my judgment may pass for aught, you may well and justly claim to have maintained the dignity and preserved the honor of the body of which you are members. The last moments of the session are passing away, and the Senate of Vermont is yet without reproach-its history still without a stain.

May I not indeed say more than this, without transgressing the limits of strict truth and justice? During the session, various interesting and important sabjects have come under your consideration, in the discussion of which, there have been exhibited, on repeated and numerous occasions, (unless some partiality of feelings has strangely blinded my judgment,) an ability in debate, a force of argument and a warmth of eloquence, which I have scarcely known equalled in this Senate chamber, and which I believe would do credit to the deliberative assemblies of any state in the Union. At all events, I cannot but think they have added to the honor of our own. And amidst the warmth and zeal which these occasions of intellectual strife have excited, there have been exhibited a dignity, an urbanity, and an exemption from all appearance of personal animosity, which might serve as an example for other legislative bodies of higher claims and loftier pretensions.

And there is one other characteristic feature of the present Session, which I apprehend must stand prominent on its records, and which I have already alluded to; but I cannot forbear to notice it more particularly. I mean, its freedom from the appearances of party movement for mere party purposes. The members of this Senate have seemed to me to be aiming at nobler ends, and to be influenced by higher and worthier considerations. Could we see the like exhibited in the Councils of our Nation, we might hope that a brighter day was dawning upon our Country. From your demeanor in these respects, I have derived a fresh guarantee for the truth of the sentiment which I have long been proud and happy to maintain, that the stern and unconquerable love of freedom, which has characterised our “Green Mountain State” from its earliest history, was not a mere untameable impatience of the restraints of law, pursuing only its own selfish purposes, but an elevated and patriotic principle, aiming at far higher and holier ends—the promotion of public good, and the advancement of a people's happiness.

I do not consider, gentlemen, that an occasion like the present, demands, as a matter of course, such commendations as I have presumed to speak; and being gratuitous, they would not have been uttered, had I not deemed that the truth would justify them, or rather, that justice demanded them; and had I not believed, too, that those of you who are most experienced, would most amply sustain my opinions, and fully clear me from the charge of lavishing unmerited eulogy.

My intercourse with you, gentlemen, during the short season for which we have been associated together, has been pleasant and gratifying; and for your generosity to me during the Session, as well as for this renewed pledge of kindly feelings at its close, I again tender you my warmest thanks. To say merely that I entertain towards each of you feelings of high respect and esteem, would be but an inadequate discharge of the obligations under which I am laid; and it were language too, too cold to satisfy the promptings of my heart. And at this hour of separation, when cold and rigid formality may be in some measure laid aside, I will so far yield to those promptings as to assure you, that I believe the friendly sentiments which I cherish towards the members of this Senate, and the gratitude which I feel for all their kindness, will not prove the mere transient emotions of an hour awakened into existence by the impulse of a softening moinent, and doomed to pass away with the occasion which gave them birth ;-but rather that they are destined to be treasured up with other cherished friendships-other precious and endearing remembrances of the past, which will cling to my heart until its pulsations shall flag in the de. cripitude of age, or the approach of dissolution.

Your duties to the state, for the session, being brought to a close, may a kind and beneficent Providence bear you safely to your firesides and your homes.

(H. 91.) Mr. Scott, from the Committee on Bills, reported that they had this day submitted to His Excellency the Governor, for his approval and signature, the House bill entitled “an act providing for the collection of taxes assessed on real estate.”

On motion of Mr. Briggs, it was Ordered, That when the Senate adjourn, it will adjourn to meet to-more row morning at half past 6 o'clock.

On motion
The Senate adjourned.

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 1843. Prayer by the-Chaplain. The reading of the journal of yesterday was dispensed with.

(S. 133.) The Senate proceeded to consider the bill from the House of Representatives entitled "an act relating to the Bank of Poultney."

And it was read the first and second times, the rule requiring a refere ence suspended, and read the third time.

And the question being, Shall the bill pass ?
Mr. Munsill demanded the yeas and nays, which were as follows:

Those Senators who voted in the affirmative are, Messrs. A. Allen, Bingham, Butler, Cutts, Griswold, Porter, Plumb, Sac bin and Scott-9.

Those Senators who voted in the negative are,
Messrs. Cahoon, Farr, Green, Hubbard, Munsill, Sprague and Starr-7.
So the bill was passed in concurrence.

Mr. Starr moved that a message be sent to His Excellency the Govern or, apprising him that the Senate have, on their part, completed the busi". ness of the Session, and are ready to adjourn sine die.

« AnteriorContinuar »