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At his establishments there were baths according to the fashion of " the town," besides "every convenience." And a similar inscription occurred by the Via Nomentana, eight miles from Rome—

IN . PRAEDIS . AURE
LIAE . FAUSTINIANAE
BALINEUS . LAVAT . MO
RE . URBICO . ET OMNIS.
1IUMAN1TAS . PRAESTA
TUR.

Those who had premises to let or sell affixed a short notice to the house itself, and more detailed bills were posted at the "advertising stations." Thus in Plautus's "Trinummus," Act v., the indignant CaUicles says to his spendthrift son, "You have dared to put up in my absence, and unknown to me, that this house is to be sold"— (" ^Edes venales hasce inscribit Uteris "). Sometimes, also, the inscription, " Illicoaedes venales" ("here is a house for sale") appears to have been painted on the door, or on the album. An auctioneer would describe a house as "Villa bona beneque edificata" (a good and well-built house), and full details of the premises were given in the larger placards painted on walls. In the street of the Fullers in Pompeii occurs the following inscription, painted in red, over another which had been painted in black and whitewashed over,—

IN . PRAEDIS . JULIAE . S . P . F . FELICIS
LOCANTUR

BALNEUM . VENEREUM . ET . NONGENTUM . PERGULAE CENACULA . EX . IDIBUS . AUG . PRIORIS . IN . IDUS . AUG . SEXTAS . ANNOS . CONTINUOS . QUINQUE. S.Q.D.L.E.N.C.

Which has been translated, "On the estate of Julia Felix, daughter of Spurius Felix, are to let from the ist to the 6th of the ides of August {i.e., between August 6th and 8th), on a lease of five years, a bath, a venereum, and nine hundred shops, bowers, and upper apartments." * The seven final initials, antiquaries, who profess to read what to others is unreadable, explain, "They are not to let to any person exercising an infamous profession." But as this seems a singular clause where there is a venereum to be let, other erudites have seen in it, " Si quis dominam loci eius non cognoverit," and fancy that they read underneath, "Adeat Suettum Verum," in which case the whole should mean, "If anybody should not know the lady of the house, let him go to Suettus Verus." The following is another example of the way in which Roman landlords advertised "desirable residences," and "commodious business premises "—

INSULA ARRIANA
POLLIANA . GN . ALIF I . NIGID I MAI
LOCANTUR . EX . I . JULIS . PRIMIS . TABERNAE
CUM . PERGULIS . SUIS . ET COENACULA
EQUESTRIA . ET . DOMUS . CONDUCTOR
CONVENITO . PRIMUM GN . ALIF I
NIGID I . MAI SER.

Said to mean, "In the Arrian Pollian block of houses, the property of Cn. Alifius Nigidius, senior, are to let from the first of the ides of July, shops with theii

* Nine hundred shops in a town which would hardly contain more than about twelve hundred is rather incredible—perhaps it should be ninety. Pergula were either porticos shaded with verdure, lattices with creeping plants, or small rooms above the shops, bedrooms for the shopkeepers. Canaaila were rooms under the terraces. When they were good enough to let to the higher classes they were called equestria (as in the following advertisement). Plutarch informs us that Sylla, in his younger days, lived in one of them, where he paid a rent of^8 a year.

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