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COLLECTION OF HYMNS

ADAPTED TO

CONGREGATIONAL WORSHIP.

BY

WILLIAM URWICK.

“Sing praises to God, sing praises; sing ye praises with un-
derstanding.”—Psalm xlvii. 6, 1.

“ Teaching and admonishing one another in psalms, and hymns,
and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the
Lord."-Col. iii. 16.

DUBLIN:

SOLD BY R. M. TIMS, W. CURRY, JUN. AND CO. M. KEENE,

D. P. GARDINER, J. M. LECKIE, J. BURNSIDE, AND THE
RELIGIOUS TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY. ALSO BY
M'COMB, BELFAST ; R. BAYNES, AND NISBET, LONDON ;
AUDSON, BIRMINGHAM; AND EDDOWES, SHREWSBURY.

1829.

ENTEREN AT STATIONER'S HALL,

P. D. Hardy, 3, Cecilia-street, Dublin

THE CONGREGATION

ASSEMBLING FOR WORSHIP

IN

YORK-STREET MEETING-HOUSE,

DUBLIN,

WITH ALL THAT IN EVERY PLACE

CALL UPON THE NAME OF

JESUS CHRIST OUR LORD,

THIS WORK IS INSCRIBED

BY THEIR

FAITHFUL SERVANT IN THE GOSPEL,

THE COMPILER.

PREFACE.

Under the Jewish dispensation, psalmody formed a prominent part of congregational worship, and we have sufficient evidence of its being continued in the devotions of the Christian church. When the ordinance of the Lord's Supper was instituted by the Redeemer, the solemnity was closed by singing a hymn. When Paul and Silas were imprisoned at Philippi, they “prayed and sang praises to God;"—and that this was not an inaudible mental exercise is plain from the fact that “the prisoners heard them.” Among other irregularities for which the Christians at Corinth were reproved, it is mentioned that in their assemblies "every one had a psalm,” and they were directed to "sing with the spirit and with the understanding also”- from which it is evident that singing was a part of their public worship, and that the whole congregation should have joined in the same song of praise. The Colossians are instructed to “teach and admonish one another in psalms, and hymns, and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in their hearts unto the Lord;" and a similar exhortation is addressed to the saints at Ephesus The

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