The American Sportsman: Containing Hints to Sportsmen, Notes on Shooting, and the Habits of the Game Birds, and Wild Fowl of America

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Lippincott, Grambo and Company, 1855 - 461 páginas

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Página 188 - scapes i' the imminent deadly breach, Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery, of my redemption thence And...
Página 45 - Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For, faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the raven away. How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start?
Página 432 - At supper this night he talked of good eating with uncommon satisfaction. ' Some people (said he,) have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind, what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very carefully; for I look upon it, that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else'.
Página 462 - The first physicians by debauch were made ; Excess began, and sloth sustains the trade. By chase our long-lived fathers earned their food ; Toil strung the nerves, and purified the blood ; But we their sons, a pamper'd race of men, Are dwindled down to threescore years and ten. Better to hunt in fields for health unbought Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise for cure on exercise depend : God never made His work for man to mend.
Página 311 - Geese which he has killed, he sets up on sticks as if alive, to decoy others ; he also makes artificial birds for the same purpose. In a good day (for they fly in very uncertain and unequal numbers) a single Indian will kill two hundred. Notwithstanding every species of Goose has a different call, yet the Indians are admirable in their imitation of every one.
Página 98 - In vain his toils th' unskilful fowler tries, While in thick woods the feeding partridge lies. Nor must the sporting verse the gun forbear; But what's the fowler's be the Muse's care.
Página 45 - For, faithful in death, his mute favorite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the raven away. How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start ? How many long days and long weeks didst thou number, Ere he faded before...
Página 105 - See how the well-taught pointer leads the way ; The scent grows warm ; he stops : he springs the prey; The fluttering coveys from the stubble rise, And on swift wing divide the sounding skies ; The scattering lead pursues the certain sight, And death in thunder overtakes their flight.
Página 308 - ... nearly to the posterior part of the eye ; the white collar is bounded below with black ; breast dark violet brown, marked on the fore part with minute triangular spots of white, increasing in size until they spread into the white of the belly ; each side of the breast is bounded by a large crescent of white, and that again by a broader one of deep black ; sides under the wings thickly and beautifully marked with fine undulating parallel lines of black, on a ground of yellowish drab...
Página 91 - To sweet repast th' unwary partridge flies, With joy amid the scatter'd harvest lies ; Wandering in plenty, danger he forgets, Nor dreads the slavery of entangling nets. The subtle dog scours with sagacious nose Along the field, and snuffs each breeze that blows ; Against the wind he takes his prudent way, While the strong gale directs him to the prey ; Now the warm scent assures the covey near, He treads with caution, and he points with fear ; Then...

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