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the sermons of the French and English, or the writers of a former age and those of the present. With regard to the comparative merit of the best sermons of the English school, and the best which have been produced on the Continent, public opinion has given a verdict, and this, when it has been tried and settled by time, may always be safely relied on. It seems to be generally conceded, that neither the French nor English have all the characteristics necessary to form a perfect model in this department of writing; and that a style of preaching which should unite the vivacity and pungent appeals of the one, with the sober and chastened reasoning of the other, would on the whole be preferable to either. Perhaps, however, this desideratum has been in a good degree realized in some of the modern English sermons, particularly in those of Mr. Hall, of Liecester, which we think on the whole inferior to no other specimens of this kind of writing in the language; and when he shall condescend to favour us with a few additional discourses, the fruit of his more recent studies, we are inclined to think, from the reports that have reached us from various quarters, that we shall have less occasion to use any qualifying terms in appreciating their excellencies. Those already published are the production of a mind which can bear down upon the intellect with a resistless force of argument, and at the same time cause the finest chords of the soul to vibrate to an almost magical power of persuasion. With all this superlative excellence, there is united nothing of eccentricity or affectation; on the contrary, the reader, while he is delighted and charmed by the argument and eloquence, feels that his author has subdued him by fair and legitimate means; that it is by the simple and natural operation of the highest intellectual energies. Dr. Chalmers, another of our popular and powerful writers, to whom we must certainly concede great force of intellect, has thrown over his noble sentiments such an air of eccentricity, by a perfectly unique and heavily decorated style, that we cannot help regretting, while reading his sermons, that he had not the power of expressing himself more in the style of other men; that so many splendid shadows should rest upon so much substantial excellence.. The consequence with respect to these two authors is,

that while one might keep the sermons of Hall upon our table, and read them daily without being sensible of any other effect than that of pleasure, and a general elevation of sentiment; the discourses of Chalmers cannot be read without a degree of labour in some measure corresponding to that which their author is subject to in the delivery of them, while they afford the Christian minister few inducements to imitation. Dr. Chalmers is certainly a great man, and the world is vastly indebted to him for his sermons; but we cannot help thinking that they would be much better, were they only divested of all those peculiarities which some of our young ministers have endeavoured to imitate. It is, however, high time for us to desist from this disquisition, and attend to the subject more immediately before us.

With regard to the Sermons of Monsieur Saunn, of which the public are now favoured with a new and much superior edition to any that has preceded it, we have little to say that has not been already said by others; and when we mention the names of Drs. Blair, Doddridge and Edward Williams, of Hervey, Cecil and Job Orton, all of whom have mentioned them in the highest terms of commendation, wc are sure our readers will excuse us from entering Upon any laboured eulogy concerning them. Of all the divines of the Continent of Europe, with whose writings we are acquainted, Saurin is the most worthy to be classed with Hall and Chalmers. To extensive erudition he united eloquence of the highest order; and while his address was that of the most polished courtier, he knew how, by manifestation of the truth, to commend himself to every man's conscience in the sight of God. The edition now before us comprises all the Sermons that were translated by Mr. Robinson, of Cambridge, by Dr. Hunter, and by Mr. Sutcliff, with some additional ones now first translated by a relative of the present Editor. It includes all Mr. Robinson's Prefaces, with those of his other Translators, and an uncommonly fine portrait of Saurin in his preaching dress. The work is printed in a fine bold type on superior paper, and the whole is executed in a style corresponding to its intrinsic merit. Having ourselves wished, for years, to see a handsome edition of these Sermons in an English dress, such as the one before us, we certainly GREEN S ESSAYS

think Mr. Baynes entitled to our gratitude for producing it; and we hope the liberality of the age will confer on him a more substantial recompencc.

Eighteen Short Essuys on Prayer and the Ministry of the Word. By Samuel Green, Baptist Minister, Bluntisham, Huntingdonshire. Printed for the Author, and Sold by Westlcy, Stationers' Court; W. Jones, Lovell's Court; and W. Baynes and Son, Paternoster Row. pp. 216; 8vo. pr. 5*. 1823.

It has often appeared to us, that the art of preaching has not in this country arrived at that pitch of excellence which, from the importance of the subject, and the encouragements which arc afforded, might reasonably be expected. Th6 number of preachers has within these few years prodigiously encreased; but contrary to the general law in those cases, that increase has only tended to scatter them wider apart so as to cover a greater surface, but has not, at least to our apprehension, improved the quality of the article. Of course we are now speaking of the cultivation of the talent of preaching as a human attainment, irrespective of that supernatural Divine agency, which in all suppositions is necessary to render iteftectual. Whatever may be the cause of this supposed declension, it certainly does not arise from a deficiency of publications on the subject; and we fee) particular pleasure in introducing another, arid we conceive, one of considerable merit, from our old and esteemed correspondent, Mr. S. Green.

Three or four of the Essays contained in this small volume have already appeared in our own, or a contemporary Journal; and the satisfaction they gave to their respective editors and readers, it appears suggested the^dea of a separate publication. Three only are on the subject of prayer; but the remaining, though relating chiefly to the christian ministry, and the character and conduct of those engaged in its duties, contain observations exceedingly valuable to every member of a christian church. The author is certainly a man of strong sense—of sterling piety—and of considerable knowledge of human nature. The character of the book in a word is, "Sound speech which cannot be condemned." Here is no tinsel, no flare,

ON PRAYER, &C. 21

no finery; but such sterling matter, as will do any man good to read- it once: but will do him more good the oftener it is read. The author does not pretend to exhibit any thing new; but he has condensed a great deal into a small compass, and has expressed his thoughts in bold and nervous, and sometimes touching language. All throughout, the observations regarding the spirit and character of the christian minister, are of greater value than the rules the author has laid down for sermonizing, which are in many cases too obvious, and too common place to justify insertion in so small a work. In the 10th, 11th, and 12th Essays, the author has given a description of what he calls six kinds of sermons; but we should rather call them so many parts of sermons, for though some discourses may have more of one of these characters than another, to devote a whole sermon to any one would be insufferably monotonous and wearisome. We have sometimes heard it done, but with no more effect than so much empty prattling.

In the Essay on "Spirituality of mind in a Christian Minister," which we re-' gard as one of the best in the work, a subject is introduced of very great importance; and as we conceive the practice is growing very much in the present day, we shall introduce the whole passage.

"If ministers would enjoy spirituality of mind, they must set a high value on their time, and not suffer even their best friends to have the command of it; if they do, they may frequently suffer losses which cannot be repaired. To be- called out of the study to speak to every one who likes to visit us, is wrong; our domestics should know that we highly value our time, and must not, at all seasons, be broken in upon. Much less should We be frequently at dinner and tea parties, where the conversation runs wild, turning upon the politics and events of the day, to the exclusion of Christ and religion. If in order to make one in the parties even of our most pious and judicious friends, to partake with them of their delicacies, we must give them five or six hours of our time, we had better give them money to excuse us. Time is short, a»d should not be so cheaply parted with; it is our best earthly treasure, and capable of incalculable improvement. To see a minister of Christ sit several hours together, smoking his pipe, and, I will not say, drinking his glass, but indulging in idleness, is an un

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the sermons of the French and English, or the writers of a former age and those of the present. With regard to the comparative merit of the best sermons of the English school, and the best which have been produced on the Continent, public opinion has given a verdict, and this, when it has been tried and settled by time, may always be safely relied on. It seems to be generally conceded, that neither the French nor English have all the characteristics necessary to form a perfect model in this department of writing; and that a style of preaching which should unite the vivacity and pungent appeals of the one, with the sober and chastened reasoning of the other, would on the whole be preferable to either. Perhaps, however, this desideratum has been in a good degree realized in some of the modern English sermons, particularly in those of Mr. Hall, of Liecester, which we think on the whole inferior to no other specimens of this kind of writing in the language; and when he shall condescend to favour us with a few additional discourses, the fruit of his more recent studies, we are inclined to think, from the reports that have reached us from various quarters, that we shall have less occasion to use any qualifying terms in appreciating their excellencies'. Those already published are the production of a mind which Can bear down upon the intellect with a resistless force of argument, and at the same time cause the finest chords of the soul to vibrate to an almost magical power of persuasion. With all this superlative excellence, there is united nothing of eccentricity or affectation: on the contrary, the reader, while he is delighted and charmed by thn argument and eloquence, feels that his author has subdued him by fair and li'giiimate means; that it is by the simple and naturul operation of the highest intellectual energies. Dr. Chalin. i9, another of our popular and powerful writers, to whom we must certainly I'ouretle great forte of intellect, has thrown over his noble sentiments such nil ulr (if ercpiitricity, by a perfectly ttfllqtIW mid heavily decorated style, that wM'Klitint help fpgir-lling, while reading lila Nwiiiiitit, I hut lip hnil tint thn power

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that while one might keep the sermons of Hall upon our table, and read them daily without being sensible of any other effect than that of pleasure, and a general elevation of sentiment; the discourses of Chalmers cannot be read without a degree of labour in some measure corresponding to that which their author is subject to in the delivery of them, while they afford the Christian minister few inducements to imitation. Dr. Chalmers is certainly a great man, and the world is vastly indebted to him for his sermons; but we cannot help thinking that they would be much better, were they only divested of all those peculiarities which some of our young ministers have endeavoured to imitate. It is, however, high time for us to desist from this disquisition, and attend to the subject more immediately before us.

With regard to the Sermons of Monsieur Saurin, of which the public are now favoured with a new and much superior edition to any that has preceded it, we have little to say that has not been already said by others; and when we mention the names of Drs. Blair, Doddridge and Edward Williams, of Hervey, Cecil and Job Ortoi*, all of whom have mentioned them in the highest terms of commendation, we are sure our readers will excuse us from entering Upon any laboured eulogy concerning them. Of all the divine* of the Continent of Europe, with whose writings we are acquainted, Saurin is the most worthy to be classed with Hall and Chalmers. To extensive erudition he united eloquence of the highest order; and while his address was that of the most polished courtier, he knew how, by manifestation of the truth, to commend himself to every man's conscience in the sight of God. The edition now before us comprises all the Sermons that were translated by Mr. Robinson, of Cambridge, by Dr. Hunter, and by Mr. Sutcliff, with some additional ones now first translated by a relative of the present Editor. It includes all Mr. Robinson's Prefaces, with those of his other Translators, and an uncommonly fine portrait of Saurin in his preaching dress. The work is printed in a fine bold type on superior paper, and the whole is executed in a style corresponding to its intrinsic merit. Having ourselves wished, for years, to see a handsome edition of these Sermons in an English dress, such as the one before us, we certainly

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jdeasant sight, and it must injure Jiim in |ioint of spirituality of mind. If such t hings are at all lawful, they cannot often lie expedient; and woe to the man who is tirought under their power. Let young ministers be particularly careful of these things: they may soon acquire habits highly injurious to their own souls, and laurttul to their hearers. Our visits should be chiefly of the pastoral kind; and in the pleasures of the table, as in every thing else, we should let our moderation be .known unto all men." ■

Mr. Green has here supplied a rod for the correction of this evil; but such is flair opinion of its enormity, that we wish he had chastised it with scorpions. An idle, gossiping minister is the veriest dffone in creation; and the more despicable, because he should be employed about the noblest of all human labours. But it is not principally in reference to ministers themselves that we feel so strongly; it is to the members of our churches, who are constantly soliciting the company of their pastors, and tempting him from his studies on every trivial occasion. A minister's time is the property of the church; and on the score of equity, it is obviously unjust that that which belongs to the whole should be engrossed by an individual. Besides, if the minister's friends will feed him on gossip every day in the week, is it strange that he should return them something of the same commodity on the Sabbath? Do these friends suppose, that after feasting with them all day, their minister is to sit up all night to study? This is a subject which requires a more rigid investigation than we have ever yet seen; and which it is moreimperativeonministers themselves to make, than even private Christians.

These Essays were evidently written at considerably distant intervals of time, and the subjects are therefore introduced not with that regard to continuity and arrangement which would be desirable. Should a Second Edition be required, the author will perceive it is not necessary for him to introduce the same quotation from Dr. Doddridge in two places within five pages of each other, as he does in pages 72 and 77.

We shall close this brief notice by a few extracts descriptive of the author's mode of writing, and the just views he has of Divine truth.

"The second kind of sermons is the Exhortatory. When sermons of this kind are delivered with judgment, earnest

ness, and affection, the minister who delivers them appears as nearly apostolic as he can do. Nor is there a sight under heaven more agreeable to one of truly evangelical principles, than a man deeply imbued with the love of God and the souls of men, standing, with angelic appearance, betwixt the living and the dead, exhorting, entreating, and persuading men as in Christ's stead to be reconciled to God. Any thing like indifference is always to be dreaded by a man who speaks on subjects of eternal moment; but it is* more so in sermons of this kind than in any other. In these a minister should glow with zeal, and burn with ardour: he should set before his hearers the vast and eternal importance of divine things in the most lively and impressive manner.

"Nothing will enable him to do this more than a well-grounded conviction of the worth of his Own soul; since he will thereby know how to value the souls of others. It will awaken all his energies, and arouse his best feelings. If, as he speaks, with eternity in full view, a tear roll down his cheek, it is not unmanly, but dignified—it is true greatness of soul; the Saviour wept over Jerusalem, and said, "If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things that belong to thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes." If a minister has deeply felt the gospel, attended with divine influence, working within him an effectual change, bringing him to feel his danger as a sinner before God, and directing him to the Lord Jesus Christ as the only hope of lost nien, he will, indeed he must, press upon his auditory the necessity of attention to their souls as the one thing needful, and urge it with the best and strongest arguments in his power. The shortness of life, the certainty of death, the uncertainty of time, the joys of heaven, and the miseries of hell, will all be brought to his assistance; he will represent them as one to whom they are familiar, and will speak like a man who never can forget the narrow escape he has experienced from the place where the worm dieth not, and where the fire is not quenched. If angels could weep, they could scarcely find a more proper object for their tears on the theatre of our world, than one who calls himself a minister of Christ standing in the pulpit, surrounded by a great number of precious and immortal souls, discussing eternal things with apathy; it is a degree of criminality in him for which we have no name sufficiently expressive."

Every minister of the Gospel would do well to imbue his mind deeply with the spirit of the following passage:—

"In every discourse the attentive hearer should be able to perceive the way

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