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IX.

My

The frighted beast ran on-but here,
(No tale, tho' in print, more true is)
Muse stops

short in mid career-
Nay, gentle reader! do not sneer!
I cannot choose but drop a tear,

A tear for good old Lewis !

X.

The frighted beast ran through the town;

All follow'd, boy and dad, Bull-dog, Parson, Shopman, Clown: The Publicans rush'd from the Crown, “Halloo ! hamstring him! cut him down !"

THEY DROVE THE POOR OX MAD.

XI.
Should you a Rat to madness teize,

Why e'en a Rat may plague you :
There's no Philosopher but sees
That Rage and Fear are one disease
Though that may burn and this may freeze,

They're both alike the Ague.

XII.
And so this Ox, in frantic mood,

Faced round like any Bull-
The mob turn'd tail, and he pursued,
Till they with heat and fright were stewed,
And not a chick of all this brood

But had his belly full.

XIII.

Old Nick's astride the beast, 'tis clear

Old Nicholas, to a tittle !
But all agree, he'd disappear,
Would but the Parson venture near,
And through his teeth, * right o'er the steer,

Squirt out some fasting-spittle.

XIV.

Achilles was a warrior feet,

The Trojans he could worry-
Our Parson too was swift of feet,
But shew'd it chiefly in retreat :
The victor Ox scour'd down the street,

The mob fed hurry-scurry.

* According to the superstition of the West-Countries, if you meet the Devil, you may either cut him in half with a straw, or force him to disappear by spitting over his horns.

XV.

Through gardens, lanes and fields new plough’d,

Through his hedge, and through her hedge, He plung’d and toss'd and bellow'd loud, Till in his madness he grew proud, To see this helter-skelter crowd,

That had more wrath than courage.

XVI.
Alas! to mend the breaches wide

He made for these poor ninnies,
They all must work, whate'er betide,
Both days and months, and pay beside,
(Sad news for Avarice and for Pride)

A sight of golden guineas !

XVII.

But here once more to view did pop

The man that kept his senses ; And now he cried—“Stop, neighbours ! stop; • The Ox is mad ! I would not swop, “ No! not a school-boy's farthing-top,

“ For all the parish-fences.”

XVIII.
“ The Ox is mad! Ho! Dick, Bob, Mat !"

What means this coward fuss?
“ Ho! stretch this rope across the plat-
“ 'Twill trip him up or if not that,
“ Why, damme! we must lay him flat

“ See, here's my blunderbuss.

XIX.

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A lying dog! just now he said

The Ox was only glad
Let's break his presbyterian head.""
“Hush!” quoth the sage, “you've been misled;
“No quarrels now let's all make head-

“ YOU DROVE THE POOR OX MAD."

XX.

As thus I sat, in careless chat,

With the morning's wet newspaper,
In eager haste, without his hat,
As blind and blundering as a bat,
In came that fierce Aristocrat,

Our pursy Woollen-draper.

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XXI.

And so my Muse perforce drew bit;

And in he rush'd and panted “ Well, have you heard ?" No, not a whit. " What, ha'nt you heard ?” Come, out with it! “ That TIERNEY votes for Mister Pitt,

“ And SHERIDAN's recanted."

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