Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub
[merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

NO. I.

THE

JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK:

BEING

• AN EASY INTRODUCTION

TO THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE:

CONTAINING

EASY AND PAVILLAR LESSONS IN SPELLING,
WITH APPROPIATE READING LESSONS,

CÁLCULATED
i To adrance the learner by ear grondations and so teach the orthography
of Johnson; walitre pronuncinetton" of Walker

tore

BY A. PICKET.
AUTHOR OF THE AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-ROOKS, Viz.
TUE JUVENILE EXPOSITOR, JUVENILE MENTOR, &c. &c.

Xothing can enter into the alections wbich stunbles at the threshold.'...Blair.

IMPROVED AND STERLOTYPED.

STEREOTYPED BY E. AND J. WHITE, NEW-YORK, FOR

DANIEL D. SMITI.

(Eleurnih Slettotup, Edilion.)
For sale by him at the Frankho Juvenile Bool and Statiorary store. N
190 Greconch-street, and by the principai Booksellers in this Chy and the l'...

1819.
{Price dolla. per doz. cena single.)

[ocr errors]

BOOKS designed to precede and accompany this Spelling-Book, viz.

[blocks in formation]

THE JUVENILE, OR UNIVERSAL PRIMER.
THE PARENT'S MANUAL, OR CHILD'S FRIEND.
THE JUVENILE MENTOR, OR SELECT READ.

INGS.
THE JUVENILE EXPOSITOR.
PICKETS' GEOGRAPHICAL GRAMMAR, &c.

fied, analo Towe! simple learne barmo

AN The lo

Der them i real bi

[graphic]

The lea

The andre

logues

Ith Tork

[ocr errors]

District of New York,

TRANSFER FROV LENCY. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the third way of February, in the thirty-eight year the Independence of the United States of America, ALBERT PICKET, of the said district, has deposited ia this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as Author and Proprietor, in the words following, to wit: "American School Class-Book, No. 1. The JUVENILL SPELLING-BOOK: being an easy introduction to the English language. Containing easy and familiar lessous in spelling, with appropriate reading lessons, calculated to advance the learner hy easy gradations, and to teach the orthography of Johoson, and the propusciation of Walker. By A. Picket, author of the “ Juvenile Expositor," etc. “ Nothing can enter into the affections, which stumbles at the threshold."...Blair. The revised and improved impression."

la conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled " An Act for the encouragernert of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the anthors and proprietors of such copies, doring the time therein rentioned." And also to an ast, entitled " A. Act, supplementary to an Act, entitled an Act for re encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Mape, Chartu, and Books, to the author nd proprietors of eucb copias, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits theree je iba aste of designing. engraving and etching kutorical and other orinto"

THERON RUDD,
Clerk of the New V3rk Dir.

PREFACE.

AN elementary book, designed for general use, ought to contain ag much useful matter as its limits will admit, and be unincumbered with abstract rules and metaphysical distinctions. It should contain, not only the standard orthography and the best usage of pronunciation, but also, plain and simple examples ; conducting the infantile pupil, step by step, from the letters of the alphabet, through syllables and words, to a series of amusing, familiar, and instructive lessons. In teaching children the first principles of reading, we should take nature for our guide. Every thing should be plain and easy. Whatever is adapted to the juvenile mind, it comprehends.

In the orthographical exercises, the lessons have been much simplified, and the pronunciation of all the words obviously pointed out, by analogical classifications, according to the specific quantity of the vowel sounds, whether long, short, middle, or broad. This plan is so simple and natural, that it requires but few directions, to enable the learner to become acquainted with the most correct orthography and harmonious pronunciation of the English language.

All uncommon or onsalete words have been serupulously omitted. 'The lumbering up of elementary books with words which are seldom or never used by chaste or cortert writers, and making children learn them in the first stages cf thicir odacation, is productive of very little real benefit. It is sacrificirg time at ciosy the mind without improving the learner either in language or•knowleito-e.",

The grand object of a SpeHmy-book, is to teach children to spell and read as soon as possible; and not to perplex them with long catalogues of words which are seldom used.

It has been the endeavour of the author to adapt the plan of the work both in manner and matter to the capacities of youth, and to enable instructers to teach the elements of our language with ease to themselves and advantage to the learner. The reading lessons have heen selected with great care. Not a word or sentiment has been intentionally inserted, which is not consonant with the purity of religion and morality, and calculated effectually to impress upon the tender mind, the love of virtue and goodness, and tr form a taste for reading..

All extraneous matter has been rejected, and the pages filled willa that which is deemed necessary and useful: comprising all that seems to be proper for an elementary school-book.

In a manual of this kind, to have omitted the principles on which our language is constructed, would have been extremely culpable. The Essentials of English Grammar have, therefore, been inserted. In

« AnteriorContinuar »