Wordsworth's Vagrant Muse: Poetry, Poverty, and Power

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Wayne State University Press, 1994 - 237 páginas

William Wordsworth's poems are inhabited by beggars, vagrants, peddlers, and paupers. This book analyzes how a few key poems from Wordsworth's early years constitute a direct engagement with and intervention into the politics of poverty and reform that swept the social, political, and cultural landscape in England during the 1790s.
In Wordsworth's Vagrant Muse, Gary Harrison argues that although Wordsworth's poetry is implicated in an ideology that idealizes rustic poverty, it nonetheless invests the image of the rural poor with a certain, if ambiguously realized, power. The early poems challenge the complacency of middle-class readers by constructing a mirror in which they confront the possibility of their own impoverishment (both economic and moral), and by investing the marginal poor with a sense of dignity and morality otherwise denied them.

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Índice

List of Plates
9
Introduction
15
The Discourse on Poverty and the Agrarian Idyll in Late Eighteenth
27
Chapter
46
The Politics of the Sublime and Wordsworths
57
Industry Idleness and Ideology in Crabbes
79
Liminal Power
113
Chapter Five
138
The Victorian Reception
173
Works Cited
213
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Acerca do autor (1994)

Gary Harrison is an associate professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University.

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