Language and Linguistic Contact in Ancient Sicily

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Olga Tribulato
Cambridge University Press, 29/11/2012
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Within the field of ancient bilingualism, Sicily represents a unique terrain for analysis as a result of its incredibly rich linguistic history, in which 'colonial' languages belonging to branches as diverse as Italic (Oscan and Latin), Greek and Semitic (Phoenician) interacted with the languages of the natives (the elusive Sicel, Sicanian and Elymian). The result of this ancient melting-pot was a culture characterised by 'postcolonial' features such as ethnic hybridity, multilingualism and artistic and literary experimentation. While Greek soon emerged as the leading language, dominating official communication and literature, epigraphic sources and indirect evidence show that the minority languages held their ground down to the fifth century BCE, and in some cases beyond. The first two parts of the volume discuss these languages and their interaction with Greek, while the third part focuses on the sociolinguistic revolution brought about by the arrival of the Romans.
 

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Índice

Introducing language
1
Evidence for the speech
49
The Elymian language
95
Phoenician and Punic in Sicily
115
Oscan in Sicily
132
Coins and language in ancient Sicily
162
The Sicilian Doric koina
223
Tradition and linguistic
265
S icnli bilingnes? Latin in the inscriptions of early
291
References
370
General index
412
Index locornm
420
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Olga Tribulato is Research Fellow in Classics at Ca' Foscari University, Venice. She has published on Greek morphology and dialectology, ancient scientific language, literary dialects and epigraphy and co-edited (with Coulter George, Matthew McCullagh, Benedicte Nielsen and Antonia Ruppel) Greek and Latin from an Indo-European Perspective (2007).

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