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main and palazzo, in the country that gave her birth.

SYNCOPE

Is that beating, or pulsing effect, which is produced by striking a note just before or after the accented part of the measure or bar, by which the regular motion of the parts is thwarted, or broken in upon, and which effect is continued by connecting the short or driving note in one bar, with the short note in the next, thus :

This musical expression has, no doubt, been suggested by those flutterings or palpitations which we feel in a state of fear and alarm, and which result from some sudden interruption or perturbation of our spirits. As the pulse may aptly represent the movement of the equal parts of a bar of music, any interruption of this motion produces the faltering sensation we now describe. Mozart has used this effect to depict the tenderest emotions; and when the mind is thrown into a state of hurry and agitation, it well expresses the conflict of contending passions.

This thwarting of the measure was often successfully used by Madame Catalani in passages representing hesitation and doubt; and when accompanied with a suitable action, its effect is highly dramatic.

RONZI.

Madame Ronzi di Begnis appeared in the year 1821, when the stage was occupied by Camporese and Bellochi; and it has been said of her, in the terms of Burke, 'surely never alighted on the stage, which she was destined to adorn, so beautiful a vision.' It is not within the design of these essays to describe every star which has risen and set, but those only of the first magnitude. Camporese claimed attention more by that genuine grace which her rank and station in life gave her, than by her merits as a singer; and Bellochi, deficient in this, maintained her place only by the truth and solidity of her vocal powers. But on Ronzi nature had lavished all her excellences. With an arch and beautiful face, and slender voice, she executed every thing with all the neatness and reedy precision of the oboe.* Her comic powers were finely shown in those duettos written purposely for her and her husband, by Rossini, and which were accompanied with such an exquisite action and witty look, that

* This instrument she could imitate exactly, by rather closing her mouth.

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