Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

From the counties of McLean and Macon-James Allen.
From the county of St. Clair-John Murray.

From the counties of Edwards, Wayne and WabashHenry. Mills.

From the county of Morgan-William O'Rear, William Weatherford, William Thomas.

From the county of Greene—James Turney.

From the counties of Fayette, Effingham and ClayRobert K. McLaughlin

From the counties of Peoria and Putnam-John Hamlin.
From the counties of Warren, Knox and Henry-Peter Butler.
From the county of Tazewell—Benjamin Mitchell.
From the counties of Washington and Perry-John D. Wood.

From the connties of La Salle, Kane and Iroquois-William · Stadden.

From the county of Fulton-Samuel Hackelton.
From the counties of Franklin and Jackson-Braxton Parrish,

From the counties of McDonough and Hancock--Thomas H. Owens.

From the county of ShelbyPeter Warren.
On motion of Mr. Maxwell,

Resolved, That the Secretary inform the House of Representatives that the Senate have met, and are ready to proceed to legislative business.

James B. Moore from the counties of Madison, St. Clair, and Monroe, elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of the Hon. John D. Whiteside, appeared, presented a certificate of his election in the present General Assembly, was qualified and took his seat.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Flood, their clerk pro tem. MR. SPEAKER:

I am directed to inform the Senate that the House of Representatives have met and organized, and are ready to proceed to legislative business.

On motion of Mr. Maxwell,

The rule of the Senate requiring resolutions to lie one day on the table was dispensed with, and it was

Resolved, That a joint select committee of two from the Senate and three from the House of Representatives, be appointed to wait on the Governor and inform him that both branches of the legislature have met and are ready to proceed to

legislative business, and to hear any communications he may think proper to make to them.

Ordered, That Messrs. Maxwell and Bond be that committee on the part of the Senate, and that the Secretary inform the House of Representatives of the adoption of said resolution and ask their concurrence therein.

On motion of Mr. Turney,
The rule of the Senate was dispensed with, and it was

Resolved, That the rules adopted by the Senate at the last session be and they are hereby adopted for the government of the Senate during the present session until otherwise ordered.

Resolved, That the joint rules adopted by the two Houses at the last session, be and the same are hereby adopted during the present session.

Ordered. That the Secretary inform the House of Representatives of the resolution last aforesaid, and ask their concurrence therein.

A message from the House of Representatives by Mr. Flood their Clerk pro tem. MR. SPEAKER:

The House of Representatives have concurred in the adoption of the resolution from the Senate, having for its object the appointment of a joint select committee, to wait on the Governor, &c. and have appointed Messrs. Moore of St. Clair, Ewing and Hardin, the committee on their part.

And he withdrew.

Mr. Gatewood, asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill for

“An act further supplemental to an act to cstablish and maintain a system of Internal Improvements;

Which was read, and
Ordered to a second reading.

Mr. Mitchell asked and obtained icave to introduce a bill for

6 An act concerning public roads;"
Which was read, and
Ordered to a second reading.
On motion of Mr. Gatewood,

The rule of the Senate was dispenscd with, and the following resolution adopted, viz:

Resolved, That a committec of five be appointed to enquire

into the expediency of changing the terms of holding the courts in the third judicial circuit.

Ordered, That Messrs. Gatewood, Lane, Hacker, Parrish, and Whiteside be that committee.

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Flood, Clerk pro tem. MR. SPEAKER:

The House of Representatives have concurred with the Senate in the adoption of the resolution, having for its object the adoption of the joint rules adopted by the two Houses at the last session during the present session.

And he withdrew.
Mr. Herndon offered for adoption the following resolution:

Resolved, That the rule requiring resolutions to lay one day upon the table before consideration, be and the same is hereby rescinded.

Which lies one day on the table.

On motion,
The Senate adjourned until 2 o'clock, P. M.

2 O'CLOCK, P. M.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Bond, from the joint select committee, appointed to wait upon

the Governor and inform him that the two Houses have met and organized, and are ready to receive any communication that he may wish to make to them, reported that they had performed that duty, and received for answer that he will deliver a written message to each House on to-morrow at 9 o'clock, A. M.

Richard B. Servant, the Senator from the county of Randolph appeared and took his seat.

Mr. Browning offered for adoption the following resolution, to wit:

Resolved by the Senate, (the House of Representatives concurring herein) That no legislative business shall be acted upon during the present session of the General Assembly, except such as may be specially submitted by the Executive,

Which lies one day on the table.

On motion,
The Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock

TUESDAY, July 11th, 1837.

}

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

A message from the Governor by Mr. Field, Secretary of State. MR. SPEAKER:

I am directed by the Governor to lay before the Senate a communication in writing.

And he withdrew.
Whereupon:

Mr. Speaker laid before the Senate the following communication and accompanying documents, viz:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Vandalia, July 11, 1837. To the Senate and House of Representatives :

GENTLEMEN :In my message at the opening of the last session it was my happiness to congratulate you on the prosperity then so eminently enjoyed by every portion of our beloved country; and from my inmost heart did I rejoice to see the industrious citizen every where reap the rich rewards of his labor. And although even then, I was not without strong apprehensions of an early reverse, I am confident no human forecast could have anticipated, so sudden a calamity as has been brought upon the country by the action of the Federal Government upon its currency. At the time the President of the United States assumed the responsibility of ordering the public moneys to be removed from their legal deposite in the Bank of the United States, for the purpose, as he avowed, of preventing the re-charter of that institution by Congress, there never was a sounder currency, or a more hcalthy state of things in any government in the world. To effect this great object, namely, that of destroying the United States Bank, rival institutions were to be created: and it will be remembered that immediately after the removal of the deposites the Government party commenced establishing State Banks, whilst State Legislatures, deluded by the fallacious promise of advantages to be derived from the deposites to be made in these institutions, which were to be fiscal agents of Government, readily fell into the measure. As might have been expected, hundreds of new banks instantly sprung up, their enormous issues of irredeemable paper afforded the inducement of universal extravagant speculation, and gave us what all must now regard a depraved and worthless currency:

Before the public were aware of the ruin which this wild scheme portended, the Executive and a portion of its party seeing their crror it would seem, endeavored to escape its consequences by amusing the people with the absurd and impracticable project of an exclusive hard money currency., I say absurd--for as well might the Executive of the United States expect to compel the citizens of the grea: valley to abandon the use of steam boats and resume the flat hottom and barge in the navigation of its thousand streams and rivers as to force them to give up a sound paper currency, at all times convertible into specie, with all its adaptedness to the purposes of the commerce and business of the country. Before such a scheme

be prosecuted to the results they promised, the intelligence, commerce, liberties and boundaries of all of these Uni-. ted States must be obliterated, and the people yield to the stubborn will and rule of a despot. These Experiments, as they have been styled by their authors, may and I believe have had their political effect; but they have also had their effect upon the country acknowledged to be full of resources, distinguished for its intelligence, its enterprise, and wonderful prosperity, in reducing it to an almost universal bankruptcy; in prostrating alike its business, its energies, and confidence.

It was in view of the motive which dictated the measure, and in anticipation of some of these results, that I opposed at first, the establishment of the State Bank of Illinois; as I did also last winter, both the increase of its capital and that of the Bank at Shawneetown.

But it is easier sometimes, to trace the causes of evils, than to find out a remedy for them. The enquiry, however, is important and useful, as the discovery of the cause, not unfre

can

« AnteriorContinuar »