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THE DIPLOMACY OF THE WAR OF 1914

V. I

THE BEGINNINGS OF THE WAR

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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

705007
ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

1915

COPYRIGHT, 1915, BY ELLERY C. STOWELL

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Published June 1915

PREFACE

In this brief account of the causes of the War of 1914, it has been possible to touch upon only the more important points. After the war is over, the results of patient research may make clear the truth of accusations and counter-accusations. I have, however, made an effort to present the questions from a really impartial and neutral point of view, even though the result may not find approval from the partisans of either side. After all, man as a rational being is most deeply concerned in the rational efforts of mankind to avoid the ills the political body is heir to, and in the end will turn from the din of battle to that preliminary conflict of brains and policies as portrayed in the dispatches of the diplomats.

The importance of the official documents issued by the belligerent Governments has been questioned, and it is well to remember that they are specially prepared for publication, and further, that the diplomats, when reporting to their Governments, do not lose from sight the advantage of having their dispatches in a form suitable for publication at short notice. The most secret and delicate negotiations may occasionally be effected through the intermediary of a special and confidential messenger or by means of the telephone. Nevertheless, the basis and permanent structure of the British diplomacy is doubtless to be found in the papers laid before the Houses of Parliament and in the discussions and explorations given in Parliament. If any doubt as to the value of these public documents has existed, it must have been dispelled by the recent publication of the Austrian Red Book, which confirms in a most remarkable manner almost every important statement of the British White Paper.

1 Some of the official publications relating to negotiations preceding the war give evidence of having been prepared with great haste. No. 141

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