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256

508

478

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PAGE
Tears, Idle Tears..
589 Ulysses..

583
Tell Me Where Is Fancy Bred.
81 Under the Greenwood Tree.

81
“That time of year thou mayest in me Universal Prayer, The.

279
behold”
74 Upon Julia's Clothes.

119
Thief, The.
I 27 Upon the Loss of his Mistresses.

'117
Three Years She Grew.
396 Village, The.

385
Tiger, The.

385 Virtue..
Time (“O Time! who knowest a lenient Visit to a Silk-Merchant, A (Citizen of the
hand to lay”)..
387 World).

289
Time (“Unfathomable Sea! whose waves are Vision of Mirza, The (Spectator)
years”).
477 Walking with God...

360
Time and Tide.
669 Westminster Abbey (Spectator).

251
Time I've Lost in Wooing, The.

“When I behold that beauty's wonderment” 71
“Tired with all these, for restful death I cry 74 When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be. 507
To (“Music, when soft voices die”). 476 “When I have seen by Time's fell hand
To (“One word is too often pro-

defaced”.

73
faned”).

When Icicles Hang by the Wall.

80
To Age.

568 “When, in disgrace with fortune and men's
To All You Ladies now at Land.

127
eyes".

73
To Althea, from Prison.
116 “When in the chronicle of wasted time",

75
To a Mountain Daisy.

369
When the Lamp Is Shattered.

488
To a Mouse.

369 When Thou Must Home. ..
To a Sky-Lark (“Ethereal minstrel, pilgrim “When to the sessions of sweet silent
of the sky”).
415 thought”.

73
To a Skylark ("Hail to thee, blithe spirit”). 475 When We Two Parted.

446
To Autumn..
494 Where Lies the Land.

684
To Cyriack Skinner.
153 Where the Bee Sucks, There Suck I.

83
To Daffodils..
119 Who Is Silvia?..

81
To Keep a True Lent..
119 Why So Pale and Wan, Fond Lover?.

116
To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars.
116 Wife of Usher's Well, The..

34
To Make Charles a Great King.
191 Willie Brewed a Peck o' Maut.

379
To Mary.
364 Windsor Forest.

260
To My Ninth Decade.
568 Wish, The..

I 26
To Night..
477 With a Guitar, to Jane.

489
To Robert Browning.

566 “With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st
To the Cuckoo...
410 the skies”.

70
To the Electors of Bristol .
322 Wordsworth.

772
To the Lord General Cromwell.
152 Work without Hope.

436
To the Memory of my Beloved, Master World, The..

123
William Shakespeare.
87 World Is Too Much with Us, The.

416
To the River Tweed..

388
World's Wanderers, The...

477
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time. 118 Written at Tynemouth after a Tempestuous
To Toussaint l'Ouverture...

417 Voyage...
To Walt Whitman in America.

787 Ye Mariners of England.
To Youth..

Yew Trees..
Triumph of Charis, The.

87 You Ask Me Why, Though Ill at Ease. 579
True-Born Englishman, The.

214
Youth and Age.

435

388
508
408

568

Printed in the United States of America

THE following pages contain advertisements of a few of

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