Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

which at present stands as a barrier between them, this social pur. pose has, it seems, been particularly opposed by Sir Jón H-k-s, -whore printed Reafins against the wilhed for opening, are made the basis of these burlesque verses.

“ Personal fatire, like other corroGves, may, as a correspondent, on this subject, remarks, have its use : and it can never be more properly applied than in the way of recrimination and felf defence. The Authors of this ironical composition (for, it seems, more than one pen has been employed on this occafion) are candid enough to accompany is with the original performances which gave rise to in, in order that the Public may judge of the one as well as the other : and it is not to be wondered at, that ro rude and ungentlemanlike an attack as the original appears to be, upon a number of families in a neigh. bourhood, hould produce a reply of this fort; for whoever cakes upon him to print and disperse inve&ives against others, becomes a Drawcanfir ; and throws down the gauntlet for any that will, to take up. If he is foiled in the consequence, he has nothing to complaia of but his own folly. Those who have a relish for farcadical humour and pointed satire, we may venture to say, will meet with as much entertainment as the nature of such a subject would admit of."Art. 22. Minutes of the Proceedings at a Court-Martial, assem.

bled to inquire into the Cause of the Loss of bis Majesty's lare Ship Ardent. Taken by George Jackson, Elg: Judge Advocate of bis Majesty's Fleet. Published by Order of the Right Honourable the Lords Commisioners of the Admiralty. 410. 2 s. 6 d. Cadell. 1780.

Military discipline, baving for its object the good of the service, overlooks all personal considerations in the attainment of this great end. Among the rigors of the Prullian discipline, we are told that a soldier was caned for sneezing, which seems to be an effort of na. cure little dependent on the will; yet an old Prolian officer remarked, that the men did not cough so often as they used to do formerly.

From the circumstances frated, Caprain Boteles will, in all probability, be consoled with milder verdicts, in private judgment, than that which was pronounced by the Court before whom he was arraigned. Art. 23. Thoughts on the dangerous Tendency of employing Foreigners. Addressed to the People of England. 8vo.

I s. 6 d. Faulder.

Whatever may be thought, of this pamphlet as a literary compofition, the Author appears to be an honeil, well-meaning patriot ; though he fays nothing about petitions or associations. Art. 24. Memoirs of the Town and County of Leicefter. Contain

ing the Antiquities of each, and the historical and biographical Relations at large. To which is added, a brief supplementary Account of the present State of Leicestershire. By John Throib;.. 12mo. 6 Vol. 12 s. sewed. Leicester, printed for the Author. Sold by Crowder in London.

We fhall not detain our Readers long with an account of this poblication. The history of a county may be rendered an intructive. entertaining, and useful performance; but it is requisite for this parpole shat the Editor Mould have taste, judgment, and aa acquaint

ance.

ance with history and antiquities; besides wbich, he must be inqui. fative, laborious and accurate; a'od it will be farther necessary that he should be able to support that expence bosh of time and money which a faithful and ingenious narration of this kind will certainly demand. From looking into these volumes it appears to us that Mr. Throlby has greatly failed as to the most agreesble and beneficial execution of a work of this nature. He expresses himself with diffidence concerning his performance, and assures the Public of the pains he has employed about it. We are unwilling wholly to condemn it, though we canpot speak in its commendation. Ii seems to us, that his plan is unpleasing and perplexing. He might have been guided much better by consulting publications of this fort concerning o her counties. Perhaps, however, he may have fuggested some hints or obfervations that may be serviceable whenever ano her History of Leicestershire thall be undertaken. Art. 25. Remarks and Conjectures on the Voyage of the Ships

Refolution and Discovery, in Search of a northerly Passage froin Kamschatka to England, after the Death of Capt. James Cook : with Reasons to imagine that those Ships have wintered in Siberia, Nova Zembla, or Lapland. 'To which is added, an Eulogium, or Tribuce of Gratitude to the Memory of that celebrated Navigator. Intended as a Prelude or introduction to a future Publication on the Subject of the North-east Pafrige. . 8vo: is. Bew. 1780. .

Letters arrived a few days ago at the India-house, containing cere , tain information that this Author is mittaken in every conjectere which he has made concerning the place where these ships wintered i. for that instead of wintering in Siberia, Nova Zembla, or Lapland, as he had conjectured, they were returning home by the way of China and the Cape of Good Hope, as might reasonably have been expectcd, without this certain informacion. Art. 26. The Crisis. Now or never. Addressed to the People

of England. Concluding with a poetical Invocation to the Genius of England.- By a Gloucestershire Freeholder. "400. Rivingen.

This Gloucestershire freeholder, though a very indifferent writer, expresies himself like an honeit and well-meaning man.

His patchwork plan of reformation is a rriennial parliameni, and change of ministers. A change of ininitiers. to those who may be immediately interested in the change, is no doubt desirable; but che people at. la ge will surely wish fur fomeshing more subitansial-annual parlia. ments, and an equal reprefenia'ion. Art. 27. An Abstract of the Trial of George Stratton, Henry

Brooke, Charles Foyer, and George Mackay, Ejquires; for depofing the Right Honourable Lord Pigot, Jate Governor of Fort St. George, in the East Indies. 8vo. I s. 6 d. Murray." '1780.

This abstract, we are informed, is printed from the notes of a gen.) reman of Lincoln's Inn; and is interded for public information, o's the defendants decline publiling the notes of their shon-hand! writers. Whatever the defendanis may propose to themselves by ovirting such a pablication, they are no doubi extemely well fatifa' fied with the event of the trial. The general circumt:ances of the

unhappy

I s. 6 d.

[ocr errors]

I s.

elegant pen : the style alone, as the Editor obferves, is sufficient to prove its authenticity. Art. 17. Two Letters from D. Hartley, E9; M. P. addressed

to the Committee of ihe County of York. 8vo. 6d. Almon. 1780.

In the first of these letters, Mr. Hartley points out, what every one saw before, the disorders of the State, proceeding from ministerial influence, by means of places, pensions, beneficial contraes, &c.' and he recommends, as the only specific cure for a diseale lo alarmingly dangerous to the body politic, a Free and INDEPENDENT PAR LIAMENT.' Mr. H. is certainly right in his prescription; but where is the apothecary who can make it up?

In his second letter, he earneitly recommends conciliatory meafures with regard to America. Here, too, Mr. H. is no less obviously in the right; and we believe he can hardly meet with an Englishman who will dissent from his opinion ; but here also we are afraid the difficulty lies in getting the prescription made up. Art. 18. Copies of the Proceedings of the General Meetings of the

Courty of Wilts; and likewise Copies of the Proceedings and Core respondence of the Committee appointed at the General Meeting of the County, held 26th January, 1780. Published by Order of the Committee. 8vo.

Baldwin, The letters of the Lords Shelburne and Radnor, and the Como MONERS Fox, Burke, Barré, 9. Pitt, and Dunning, will render this pamphlet acceptable to the Public in general. The other petitioning counties would do well to follow the example of Wiltshire, in printing their correspondence ; which will, at leall, be attended with this advantage,- it will point out to the people of this country, those noble and worthy persons who were friends to a deign which might have produced the happiest consequences to the British nation, in respect of that most important article, Public OECONOMY!

MEDICAL. Art. 19. An Enquiry into the Origin of the Gout; wherein its

various Symptoms and Appearances are traced to their Cause; and. a fafe and certain Mode of remedying it proposed. By John Scott, M. D. 8vo. 35. sewed. Becket, 1780.

That the Gout till continues the opprobrium medicorum, is certainly not owing to a want of attention to it in the faculty, since scarce a month palles which does not bring with it some new treatise on this disease.' Of the number of these which have passed before us in their quiet course to the pacific ocean of oblivion, we have not met with any, whose progress will probably be more unnoticed than the present. Its dodrines are fo refined and subtilized, and its precepts are so crite and general, that it hardly offers a single temptation to readers, either learned or unlearned, to give it a perusal. We are sorry to be obliged to assert, that scarcely any ching ever came before us in the shape of a scientific treatise, so utterly void of precise and accurate ideas from one end to the other. Here is a great deal about nervous fluid, æthereal (pirit, electric principle and phlogiston ; with their ebullitions, impetuses, periodical tides, deflagrations, &c. by ringing the changes on which terms, every phnomcmon of the gout is accounted for without the least difficulty or hesitation. Though there is no hint in this publication of the author's posleffing a noftrum, yet we cannot but fuípe&t thac it is preparatory to the appearance of one s fince in the chapter where one would expect him to come to the point, and declare - his safe and effectual remedy,' there is nothing but inexplicable enigma. The great matter, he tells us, is to reconduct the side of animat spirits in its proper channel, through the intestinal canal.' But no purge, nor any thing ltámulative, is proper for this purpose ;'s and what is, he leaves us to discover by our own fagacity. He is a little more explicit under the head of regimen; though, indeed, we are not greatly informed, when he tells us, that diet is bef • which prodoces after every meal a general glow through all the abdominal viscera, together with a serene hilarity of mind. The gentleman has certainly a lively fancy, and would probably succeed in poetry; witness the following pretty passage, The periodical tide,'No, on second thoughts, the ladies will frown at us:--we therefore recommend the curious reader to the book.

HUSBANDRY. Art. 20. Pratiical Husbandry; or, the Art of Farming, with

a Certainty of Gain : as practised by judicious Farmers in the Country, The Result of Experience and long Observation. By Dr. John Truller of Cobham, Surry. In this work is contained all the Knowledge necessary in the plain Business of Farming, unincumbered with Theory, Speculation, or experimental Enquiry also, a Number of Eltimates of the Expences and Profits of diffe. rent Crops in the common Way, taken from Minutes kept; and a variety of useful Remarks' not to be met with in any Books of Agriculcure. Together with Directions for measuring Timber. 8vo. 3 s. 6 d. rewed. Baldwin. 1780.

The art of farming with a certainty of gain! How unfortunate was Mr. Marshall not to have seen this book before he wrote his chapter on the hazard of farming. No one, not even excepting the eminent Mr. Curl, was ever more happy in the choice of his titlepages than Dr. Joho Trufler. As, indeed, it is in general the only part of his various publications in which he has an exclusive proper:y, it would be unpardonable not to beltow fome pains to make it as finished and captivating as posible. The present work is a meagre compilation from Young and Mortimer. "So far from containing, as this Reverend Plagiary asserts, a variety of useful remarks not to be met with in any books of agriculture, we will venture to say, there is scarcely a plough-driver in the kingdom but knows as much of farming as can poslibly be learned from this catch penny performance.

MISCELLANEOUS. Art. 21. Rhyme and Reafon : or, a fresh Stating of the Argu

menis againit an Opening through the Wall of Queen's Square, Westminiter. By a Knight. With the original Arguments at the Bottom of the Page, for be Information of the Inquisitive, &c. 4to. 1 s. 6d. Faulder, &c. 1780.

A defire having been expressed, and a scheme formed, to promote a neighbourly intercourse among the inhabitants of Queen's Square, Parkstreet, &c. by opening a conveniens passage through the wall

which

li 4

which at present stands as a barrier between them, this social pure pose has, it seems, been particularly opposed by Sir J-n H-kos, -whose pripted Reasons againt the wilhed for opening, are made the balls of these burlesque verses.

“ Personal tatire, like other corsoaves, may, as a correspondent, on this subject, remarks, have its use: and it can never be more properly applied than in the way of recrinination and self defence. The Authors of this ironital composition (for, it seems, more than one pen has been employed on this occafion) are candid enough to accompany it with the original performances which gave rise to in in order that the Public may judge of the one as well as the other : and it is not to be wondered at, that so rude and ungentlemanlike an attack as the original appears to be, upon a number of families in a neigh. bourhood, should produce a reply of this fort ; for whoever cakes upon him to print and disperse invectives against others, becomes a Drawcanfir ; and throws down the gauntlet for any that will, to take up. If he is foiled in the consequence, he has nothing to complain of but his own folly. Those who have a relish for sarcastical humour and pointed satire, we may venture to say, will meet with as much entertainment as the nature of such a subject would admit of.. Art. 22. Minutes of the Proceedings at a Court-Martial, assem

bled to inquire into the Cause of the Loss of his Majesty's late Ship Ardent. Taken by George Jackson, Esg: Judge Advocate of his Majesty's Fleet. Published by Order of the Right Honourable the Lords Commisioners of the Admiralty. 410.. 25. 6 d. Cadell.

78c. Military discipline, having for its object the good of the service, overlooks all personal considerations in the attainment of this great end. Among the rigors of the Prullian discipline, we are told that a soldier was caned for sneezing, which seems to be an effort of nacure little dependent on the will; yet an old Prufian officer remarked, that the men did not cough so often as they used to do formerly.

From the circumftances stated, Captain Boreler will, in all proba-. bility, be consoled wiib milder verdicts, in private jadgment, than that which was pronounced by the Court before whom he was arraigned. Art. 23. Thoughts on the dangerous Tendency of employing For

reigners. Addressed to the People of England. 8vo. 1S. 6 d. Faulder.

Whatever may be thought of this pamphler as a literary compofition, the Author appears to be an boneil, well-meaning patriot ; though he says nothing about petitions or associations. Art. 24. Memoirs of the Town and County of Leicefter. Contain

ing the Antiquities of each, and the historical and biographical Relations at large: To which is added, a brief supplementary Account of the present State of Leicesterthire. By John Throby.. ,12mo. 6 Vol. 12 s. fewed. Leicester, printed for the Author. Sold by Crowder in London.

We hall not detain our Readers long with an account of this publication. The history of a county may be rendered an inftructive. entertaining, and useful performance; but it is requisite for this purpole ihat the Editor Mould have talte, judgmens, and sa acquaint

ace.

« AnteriorContinuar »